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blankseplocked I would like to move to Denmark or any other Nordic country
 
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Rialtor
Amarr
Yarrrateers
Posted - 2007.10.25 17:23:00 - [61]
 

Originally by: Ademaro Imre

Linkage

I don't believe the drug companies control the FDA, its the other way around, the FDA hampers the drug companies delaying approval. Even with that said, everyone has access to the best medicine as soon as its available. And that may be why the cost of medicine seems high. I have never seen a comparison of what socialized healthcare doctors are allowed to approve. HMO's and insurance companies may not approve the brandnames, but they will approve the generic brands. And that is another issues with the FDA, many generic brands must be produced in the USA to guranttee safety.

The US healthcare is under extreme pressure which is being ignored by politicians so one side can buy votes, and the other side can pay off friends by doing nothing about illegal immigration. 30% of the crime in the US is done by illegal aliens, and some 77 hospitals went bankrupt and had to be bailed, and 100 are ready to do it again providing free healthcare to people that can't pay - entirely illegal aliens, as the entire southwest US morphs into Mexico as 12% percent of their population drains the resources of the US. 40% of health care to US citizens are subsidized by the US government anyway. Because health care is not mandatory, many healthy people like me only carry catastrophic health care, because no one can be denied insurance when they do want some. If I get diagnosed with cancer. I can buy insurance tomorrow as if I had full insurance my entire life.

Anyway - I still think his opinion is idiotic. I don't think any country is a "paradise" compared to the US. Take where I live. The last time a crime was committed in my township was when I set off illegal fireworks and some neighbors were concerned about what sounded like a warzone. Before that, someone in a car 6 months ago plowed over someone's mailbox. My township got rid of the police officers actually, and combined services with another township, which gives me an extra 10 minutes to clean up my pyrotechnics.




What drives US Health care costs up is the government mandates/intervention. Insurance companies aren't free to compete on the open market. For example I can't buy HC insurance from Maryland if I live in a NY. There's no sane reason to not allow that. You're just destroying competition.

The Government dictates very specific plans and layouts for insurance companies to follow, instead of just letting the market work things out. The end result is a company with close ties to government, which drives prices up. This can easily end up with corrupt institutions.

When Government tries to dictate Healthcare it applies blanket rules across a varied group of people. The US is a very expansive territory, that can't be covered with blanket legislation. The market is more free to adjust with client demands. Also the private sector can offer a more divirse assortment of insurance to a wider range of people based on age, sex, location, etc. IMO, the market is the best option.

I would also like to hold my own right not to own healthcare for myself. As I did not have healthcare by choice until recently. So in my mind, the goals of private healthcare are more to my liking. While currently the US healthcare system is broken, I don't think the ideal answer is a government solution for the US.

Arcticblue2
Gallente
Nordic Freelancers inc
Posted - 2007.10.25 17:49:00 - [62]
 

Originally by: Rialtor
Wall of text


I'm not going to say that Norways healthcare system is the best, or better than US.
In all fairness it probably is better in US than in Norway, however I do feel that whenever I have been needing their service I have got the help I needed too.

We do however have some problems like ques to get proper threatment (ofcourse lifethreathning help goes before other), wich again mean that people are sometimes unnessesary long out on sickleave here (wich btw is like 90% of your normal payment (paid by the government).
If you go more than one year on sickleave you get an offer to reeducate yourself (education with payment) to something you can do, sometimes it is the type of work or place that make you sick.

Still I feel that sure it is not good that people have to wait for proper threatment but people in general does get taken good care of here.

Insidi Us
Amarr
Lyptica
Posted - 2007.10.25 17:50:00 - [63]
 

Dang, now I'm really torn between Denmark and Sweden. I'll learn whatever country's language I move to, because I think it's arrogant to make people speak English just because they "should" in the international sense.

Rialtor
Amarr
Yarrrateers
Posted - 2007.10.25 18:09:00 - [64]
 

Edited by: Rialtor on 25/10/2007 18:14:37
Originally by: Arcticblue2
Originally by: Rialtor
Wall of text


I'm not going to say that Norways healthcare system is the best, or better than US.
In all fairness it probably is better in US than in Norway, however I do feel that whenever I have been needing their service I have got the help I needed too.

We do however have some problems like ques to get proper threatment (ofcourse lifethreathning help goes before other), wich again mean that people are sometimes unnessesary long out on sickleave here (wich btw is like 90% of your normal payment (paid by the government).
If you go more than one year on sickleave you get an offer to reeducate yourself (education with payment) to something you can do, sometimes it is the type of work or place that make you sick.

Still I feel that sure it is not good that people have to wait for proper threatment but people in general does get taken good care of here.



Just saying Universal Healthcare at a federal level in the US is not such a good idea. If some form of universal Healthcare system was to be provided it needs a state based approach.
It would be just like if the EU decided to blanket HC across all it's members. It would totally ignore the individual needs of each particular country. That would be the analogy to doing HC at a federal level in the US.
Norway is rather small and your HC system works for you. 1 because your country can adapt rather rapidly to the needs of a few. If you tried to enforce Norway's HC institution on the entire EU, you'd have problems. Things such as this should operate on a more local level. When you expand the HC system to that many people it becomes harder and harder to provide any changes to the system in a timely and effective manner.

On the other hand things like national defense should operate on a federal level. Just for the sake of efficiency and to elminate redundancy.

But Policing of Citizens should be provided at a local level.

The point I'm making is that you have to look at each institution individually, gather it's specifications and determine which level to manage it.

Edit: Just some food for thought. Take 2-4 people and decide where to go for lunch. No big deal, you can probably make concessions easily to one another. Now try the same thing with 10 people, you may find a common place to each, but the time it would take to make the decision would be costly. Such phenomenons exists on a political level as well. Try to pass a law in a state, like an indoor smoking ban. You could pull that off on a local level without "too" much fuss as they did in NY. However, you try to do that same change to 100s of millions of people and you have a huge issue on your hands. Being that it was no small issue in NY alone.

Insidi Us
Amarr
Lyptica
Posted - 2007.10.25 21:14:00 - [65]
 

I took a Health and Society class last semester, and the US health care system was its main focus, but there were comparative sections. The consensus of the class was that the US would eventually move to a "safety net" type of coverage controlled by the individual state, much like Canada does by province. There are just too many differences to make it a federal system, and my mention of it in my first post was misleading.

California is leading the way with a state-run safety net system where employers either provide health insurance to its employees or pay a portion of their profits into a state fund that will go to pay for everyone else. Parts of it are debatable, but the overall system seems to have a good chance of working out.

By safety net I mean a minimum level of coverage. England's health system is a safety net, because they provide universal coverage, but some of the richer citizens are fed up with queues and caps on what can be done (like only a million MRIs a year, no more) so they are buying private insurance to get better care. So better coverage is available if you're willing to pay for it, but I don't think you'll have cases of children dying because they went to the wrong hospital (where they were turned away for not being covered by the right HMO).

About Sicko, the Michael Moore movie, it had some good and bad points. The example in France of the engineer and his wife (also an engineer or an assistant of some type) is not the typical story of that country. Like the UK, inner city/lower income residents (including immigrants) get poorer coverage. If Moore would have profiled a family like the ones in "La Haine" there might have been a different outcome. But overall it was a thought-provoking while mainstream-minded movie.

Ademaro Imre
Caldari
Posted - 2007.10.25 22:09:00 - [66]
 

The US does have a safety net, "Medicaid," not to be confused with Medicare that is for the elderly and social security recipients. What you are describing is far more reaching than a safety net.

Of course there is always a debate as to what to do do with the gray area just above the requirements for Medicaid. A large part of health care and income in US is socialized. If one were to combine social security administration, medicare, medicaid (in part financed and operated by states), the welfare agencies and other entities, it would be astonishing just how vast a one provider system is. That one provider, the US government, acts through all sorts of agencies.

Rialtor
Amarr
Yarrrateers
Posted - 2007.10.26 05:28:00 - [67]
 

Originally by: Insidi Us
By safety net I mean a minimum level of coverage. England's health system is a safety net, because they provide universal coverage, but some of the richer citizens are fed up with queues and caps on what can be done (like only a million MRIs a year, no more) so they are buying private insurance to get better care. So better coverage is available if you're willing to pay for it, but I don't think you'll have cases of children dying because they went to the wrong hospital (where they were turned away for not being covered by the right HMO).


There's a fallacy that free healthcare exists. The term free healthcare is just a naming convention. Nothing is free, it's obviously paid for by all its citizens in the way of duties/taxes. The fact that they're paying for more healthcare kind of means they're paying double, while it is kind of transparent, it's pretty much the case. They nd up being double covered, maybe I'm wrong and there's a way to opt out, but I doubt it.

I truly believe that an open free market for healthcare and insurance will eventually lead to lower rates for that population. It's odd that insurance rates go up and up as technology advances. It's one of the few if not the only industry where this is the case.

Jolly OzzyJones
Caldari
Asur Heavy Industries
Posted - 2007.10.26 05:46:00 - [68]
 

Being a dane myself, I wouldnt wanna trade with anyone Very Happy

Originally by: hattifnatt
Learning danish = Fail because they suck at pronouncing their own language

So true lol!

Originally by: Frygok

Denmark, is the second born, but the first boy. The radical of the children, trying to push the boundaries and break the rules, to much dismay of big sister. Is a smoker, drinker, is a bit meh regarding the future and just want to relax and have a good time, and can't understand other peoples need to comment on the lack of discipline. Parents wonder what on earth went wrong compared to the big sister.


There it is!

Also. Lol at all the scandinavians trying do the "we're better than you!" "No we are the best" "No WE are uber!!!11" Very Happy

But if you say you speak a little German, I would reckon that Denmark would be your best choice Razz As the languages (minus grammar) is very much alike.

Insidi Us
Amarr
Lyptica
Posted - 2007.10.26 06:02:00 - [69]
 

Originally by: Rialtor

There's a fallacy that free healthcare exists. The term free healthcare is just a naming convention. Nothing is free, it's obviously paid for by all its citizens in the way of duties/taxes. The fact that they're paying for more healthcare kind of means they're paying double, while it is kind of transparent, it's pretty much the case. They nd up being double covered, maybe I'm wrong and there's a way to opt out, but I doubt it.


Nope, they are "paying twice" which is why it's only for the rich or upper-middle class.

Originally by: Rialtor

I truly believe that an open free market for healthcare and insurance will eventually lead to lower rates for that population. It's odd that insurance rates go up and up as technology advances. It's one of the few if not the only industry where this is the case.


Aside from robotics, not a whole lot of medical technology gets invented to make things more efficient, they are made to fill a gap. Other things get invented to cure ailments that didn't exist 100 years ago, like ADD, CFS, or anorexia (or Restless Leg Syndrome). They weren't "medicalized" behaviors back then. Plus now treatment is way more often for chronic diseases like cancer, and as people are able to live longer they are entitled to the medical care no one was old enough to need 50 years ago.

That's why many people try and focus on prevention, which is classist. You can tell people to exercise more and eat healthy foods, but that takes time and more money. There's a reason why so many lower-class families eat fast food: It's cheap, it's filling, and it tastes good. Lower-income workers also do jobs that place them in hazardous situations, like black lung-infected coal miners or arthritic factory workers.

Anyways, that's a crash course on your last point on rising insurance rates.

BTW, Medicaid is not a safety net in the way I used it. I can't qualify for Medicaid because I make too much money, but I can't get private insurance because I have a pre-existing condition that used to be covered while I was on my Dad's plan. Once I turned the maximum age I was cut off, and I've been trying every few months for about two years now to get covered in case of catastrophe without luck. The number of uninsured US citizens is rising, and is about 20% right now. They don't have a safety net.

Den enjen
Red Dwarf Mining Corporation
space weaponry and trade
Posted - 2007.10.26 06:11:00 - [70]
 

uhm....

Can i have your stuff?

Le Cardinal
Spricer
Raiden.
Posted - 2007.10.26 10:22:00 - [71]
 

Originally by: Arcticblue2
Originally by: Rialtor
Wall of text



If you go more than one year on sickleave you get an offer to reeducate yourself (education with payment) to something you can do, sometimes it is the type of work or place that make you sick.




That is extremely simplified. A process of getting reeducation and financial support for it can take several years.

If your sickleave is caused by physical or psychological problems u might end up with "yrkesrettet attføring". Dunno the english word for that and too lazy to search for it. You get financial help for a certain period of time and closer attendance from qualified personell within employment office. Their job is to help u find a job that can suit u. Smile


Arcticblue2
Gallente
Nordic Freelancers inc
Posted - 2007.10.26 14:34:00 - [72]
 

Originally by: Le Cardinal
Originally by: Arcticblue2
Originally by: Rialtor
Wall of text



If you go more than one year on sickleave you get an offer to reeducate yourself (education with payment) to something you can do, sometimes it is the type of work or place that make you sick.




That is extremely simplified. A process of getting reeducation and financial support for it can take several years.

If your sickleave is caused by physical or psychological problems u might end up with "yrkesrettet attføring". Dunno the english word for that and too lazy to search for it. You get financial help for a certain period of time and closer attendance from qualified personell within employment office. Their job is to help u find a job that can suit u. Smile




Yeah I went on sickleave for about 1 year before I went back to school and later over to work, where they at first paid like 75% (government that is) of my paycheck, next year they paid 50% and third 25% and after 3 years the workplace had to choose if they wanted me there or not.

Still .. felt pretty "safe" and taken care of by the government ... that is ofcourse I also felt abit lost at times, they sometimes do not tell you what you are entitled to of benefits and you sort of got to either find out yourself or ask ****load of questions.

DasDizzy
Beyond Divinity Inc
Posted - 2007.10.26 15:56:00 - [73]
 

if choosing one of the scandinavian contries choose denmark, its the cheapest and the best of em

Rialtor
Amarr
Yarrrateers
Posted - 2007.10.26 17:26:00 - [74]
 

Edited by: Rialtor on 26/10/2007 17:50:18
Edited by: Rialtor on 26/10/2007 17:48:20
Originally by: Insidi Us
There's a reason why so many lower-class families eat fast food: It's cheap, it's filling, and it tastes good. Lower-income workers also do jobs that place them in hazardous situations, like black lung-infected coal miners or arthritic factory workers.


I don't know what world you live on :), but fast food isn't cheap :). It's cheaper than a middle/upper class restaurants, but it's hardly cheap compared to raw ingredients you get from the super market.

If you buy 1 meal per member, if you have a 5 person family, it's roughly about $6 average per meal. So that's $30 dollars. With $30 dollars you can probably buy enough ingredients to last 2-3 meals.

Eating healthier does not cost more money than McDonalds. Fruits and veggies are cheap, Poultry and Fish are not un-affordable by lower class families. Prevention is the way to go as all groups can do it. However all groups cannot afford medicine, if they one day make the "all-you-can-eat" pill I'm sure the lower class couldn't afford it.

But it should be a personal responsibility issue. However if Healthcare is socialized then it gives all funders (everyone) a right to complain about your lifestyle. Because the end result is all the funders having to pay for the irresponsibility of that person that does not practice prevention. That's why I'm fundamentally resistant to socialized medicine, the mere philosophy of it. It gives others a perfectly understandable position to interfere in other people's lives and request them to live in a certain fashion. While this is ok for some things (like following the law for example) I don't think people should be obligated to live a healthy life. If you want to eat like a monster, and smoke a cigarette, get smashed and pass out, imo that should be up to you. Under a socialized system, it's not really just up to you, everyone has a stake in your lifestyle at that point, because int he end you're going to drive up costs. That's the principle in which I hate socialized systems. At least if you had to pay for it yourself, the end result would be you trying to minimize your costs, and if you don't the costs are your own doing. In the end you have a choice live healthy or pay more.

Insidi Us
Amarr
Lyptica
Posted - 2007.10.26 18:50:00 - [75]
 

By cheap I don't just mean money, I mean time. It's hard to explain because the fact that you are posting here means you aren't a member of the underclass or working poor, and since I doubt you study sociology you're like many Americans who have almost no class awareness. I mean, one out of five children in this country are born into poverty. If you really think about it, that's a freaking depressing statistic, but it was news to me when I first learned it. There are 10,000 (!) foster children in San Diego alone. What hope do they have? No, not everyone can "make it" if they just work hard and apply themselves. That's called the Horatio Alger myth. Class mobility in America is no greater than in any other developed country, and some studies say its worse. People have these ideas about what makes our country great, but almost every statistic puts us equal or worse to other 1st world countries. We are not unique, or a shining beacon of humanity.

Anyways, put yourself into the shoes of a single mother with two kids. You have to work two jobs to pay the bills, or accept welfare which now requires you to work a dead-end job like dish washing or bathroom cleaning, so you don't have the time to go to college. Your money goes to child care, your health care is probably covered by Medicaid, but between your two 8 hour shifts you have to prepare three meals and get some sleep so you aren't fired from your jobs where there's a line of other poor people waiting to fill any openings. You're stressed to hell and back, so you might substitute fast food for dinner every night, make your kids a weak breakfast and use the school lunch program (which uses crap food ingredients) to feed them the rest of the time. What's easier: taking an hour a week to buy fresh groceries and prepare a good meal every night (takes me at least a half hour to feed myself, a bachelor, with just spaghetti), or grabbing 2 happy meals and a combo meal for yourself on the way home from work?

Besides, the US stands with South Africa as being the only two developed countries without a safety net health program. If almost every other country can provide universal coverage without feeling like their lives are being interfered with constantly by their neighbors or government (not saying it doesn't happen, it's just the same as it is here really) then it doesn't seem to be the worst thing in the world to have here. And make no mistake, we'll have it eventually. The 20% uninsured will grow in number, and they can vote.

Rialtor
Amarr
Yarrrateers
Posted - 2007.10.26 20:36:00 - [76]
 

Edited by: Rialtor on 26/10/2007 21:16:46
Originally by: Insidi Us
...


Well, nothing about the post mentioned it being time effective, which is a different issue. But I think it's faster to make your kids a sandwich than it is to wait in line at McDies. It's faster, cheaper, and healthier overall the much better solution for a poor household. A lot of the time spent in McDies could be spent making "spaghetti." As well as providing a better meal for your 2 precious children. And they are worth every single second you spend at work, and the 30 minutes you spend cooking them food.

No one said parenthood and/or being poor was easy, and I commend the poor person that struggles to raise her kids by herself and provide for them. I actually donate to such charities that try to health the poverty situation in America. But if you give Fast food to your kids every night you're not a good parent. At that point your kids are more important than your own mental state, and you should struggle to make sure they get the best possible upbringing that you can provide. Those kids are your responsibility. And if that means taking a few hours to make a dozen sandwiches for your kids throughout the week then so be it.

At the same time you're teaching your kids a valuable lesson. Probably the most important lesson that a parent can teach their child. The value of hard work and taking care of one's responsibility with self dignity and respect.

And it's not that long that a single parent has to struggle that hard. Kids aren't invalids at some point you can teach them how to help you and make all your lies easier. There's nothing that brings more pride to a family unit than to struggle together and become self-reliant.

The 20% number will grow if nothing is done to make the free market insurance company work. One of the main factors in the price of healtcare is in fact too much government interference with the free market solution. If the free market can provide things such as computers and cellphones at such a low price that just about anyone in America seeking one can afford it, then the free market can probably provide affordable Healthcare. They would also offer more forms of healthcare with more variety and tailored to specific types of people than the federal government could hope to achieve.

Also medical trials on newer faster, more efficient techniques happen all the time. New treatment options are always researched, and newer technologies only help to aid in the process.

For example, computers, medical software, cheaper highspeed access have helped a great deal to streamline the process, while giving industry professionals instant access to a huge array of information which may have taken more time a few years ago. So I don't see why you would say technology is somehow not making vast improvements in medical fields as it has done in any other field. If you're saying medical tools like scalpels aren't changing much, so what, there's other sections to the medical industry than syringes.

However, in the face of streamlining and new advances prices have risen, not fallen.

Danton Marcellus
Nebula Rasa Holdings
Posted - 2007.10.26 21:13:00 - [77]
 

I'd not move here, winter or rather moist darkness is 10 months of the year with 2 months of summer, maybe.

The only reason to move here is the women and I'd seriously suggest you move somewhere with a decent climate and import.

Rikeka
Eye of God
Posted - 2007.10.26 21:40:00 - [78]
 

I live in Argentina. Anyone care to trade for a few months? Laughing

Cipher7
Posted - 2007.10.26 22:11:00 - [79]
 

"poverty" means nothing in America as the standard of living is so high.

I see people in the supermarket all the time paying for groceries with food stamps. They're not buying simple staples like grain or rice, they're buying Hot Pockets and microwave dinners and paying with their WIC card.

When people are "poor" in America it means they can't afford an Xbox.

The ones who live on the street are usually mentally ill. I would be in favor of sheltering them in jails but that would trample on their human rights so they sleep in subways.

We do have homeless shelters for people to go and sleep.

We have medicaid for people to get medical care.

We have food stamps for the poor to go buy food.

What more can we possibly do to help the poor?

Wendat Huron
Stellar Solutions
Posted - 2007.10.26 23:10:00 - [80]
 

Originally by: Cipher7
"poverty" means nothing in America as the standard of living is so high.

I see people in the supermarket all the time paying for groceries with food stamps. They're not buying simple staples like grain or rice, they're buying Hot Pockets and microwave dinners and paying with their WIC card.

When people are "poor" in America it means they can't afford an Xbox.

The ones who live on the street are usually mentally ill. I would be in favor of sheltering them in jails but that would trample on their human rights so they sleep in subways.

We do have homeless shelters for people to go and sleep.

We have medicaid for people to get medical care.

We have food stamps for the poor to go buy food.

What more can we possibly do to help the poor?


Socialized healthcare?

Rialtor
Amarr
Yarrrateers
Posted - 2007.10.26 23:30:00 - [81]
 

Originally by: Wendat Huron
Originally by: Cipher7
"poverty" means nothing in America as the standard of living is so high.

I see people in the supermarket all the time paying for groceries with food stamps. They're not buying simple staples like grain or rice, they're buying Hot Pockets and microwave dinners and paying with their WIC card.

When people are "poor" in America it means they can't afford an Xbox.

The ones who live on the street are usually mentally ill. I would be in favor of sheltering them in jails but that would trample on their human rights so they sleep in subways.

We do have homeless shelters for people to go and sleep.

We have medicaid for people to get medical care.

We have food stamps for the poor to go buy food.

What more can we possibly do to help the poor?


Socialized healthcare?


I'll never understand why people think healthcare is such a huge deal for the majority of people.
I've been to a doctor less than 10 times in my life.
I've received all my shots from free clinics (which I agree should exist as disease prevention is paramount), but that's a far cry away from socialized healthcare.
I was diagnosed with TB (dormant), just underwent that same free clinic's supervision. The care was great, not very long wait periods at all -- Free pills. So forgive my lack of emotion when I hear that people are un-insured in this country. I've been uninsured (by choice) for the last 6-7 years and it hasn't effected anything (except for having more money in my savings account) as I wouldn't have gone to the doctor anyway.
And I'm not even completely "healthy", but I self-diagnosed my problems, and there's no cure anyway so no real benefit to going.

Dental insurance was quite nice for kids, they get to have braces and things like that, but that's usually superficial.

The only form of healthcare that's really a must have is accidental insurance coverage, maybe some short-term disability.

If you're a father that would mean you have a decent job to which to provide for your kids, so getting insured isn't a big issue once you have a decent job.

But for the majority of young single people, insurance isn't all that needed. It's a luxury.

Cipher7
Posted - 2007.10.27 03:55:00 - [82]
 

Originally by: Wendat Huron

Socialized healthcare?


I think socialism is a great system in homogenous countries, where people share common ethnic ties.

In multicultural countries people generally abuse the system because theres no tribal or ethnic solidarity, people are less willing to pay for the care of those they view as "leeching" off the system.

Aesgrim
Big Shadows
Atlas Alliance
Posted - 2007.10.27 18:37:00 - [83]
 

I really like this topic :)

However, I`m quite curious what people abroad (of any of the Nordic nations) think about us.
Enough of this chestbeating from swedes, danes and norwegians. (We know we live a good life over here.)
I want to have the opinions from the world outside of scandinavia.

What do you think about the people?
What do you think about the cities?
Traffic?
Nature?
And so on.


Ademaro Imre
Caldari
Posted - 2007.10.28 03:11:00 - [84]
 

Originally by: Insidi Us

BTW, Medicaid is not a safety net in the way I used it. I can't qualify for Medicaid because I make too much money, but I can't get private insurance because I have a pre-existing condition that used to be covered while I was on my Dad's plan. Once I turned the maximum age I was cut off, and I've been trying every few months for about two years now to get covered in case of catastrophe without luck. The number of uninsured US citizens is rising, and is about 20% right now. They don't have a safety net.


Get a lawyer. Its a federal law that insurance companies can not impose more than a 12 month waiting period, and no waiting period if you had prior coverage, or no breaks of more than 63 days.

I just bought health insurance. $82/month $3,500 deductible while the insurance company pays 90% of just about everything until my 10% adds up to $3,500 with my max out of pocket bill of $1200. Its just $20/week for me. My car insurance costs more than that! (and if I have a wreck that is my fault , I have a $500 deductible per accident and they just raise the rates on me to make the money back in three years!)

You can get catastrophic health care coverage for about $20-30 a month also. I would say all states have insurance plans for those that can not get insurance. In fact, I buy worker's compensation insurance coverage for my business from the state - its cheaper too. Totally different thing really, but states do offer things like that.

Ademaro Imre
Caldari
Posted - 2007.10.28 03:19:00 - [85]
 

Edited by: Ademaro Imre on 28/10/2007 03:23:31
Edited by: Ademaro Imre on 28/10/2007 03:21:47
Originally by: Cipher7


When people are "poor" in America it means they can't afford an Xbox.


You mean an an Xbox, accessories, cable internet, 3 controllers and 60 games.

This is what its like to be poor in the USA.

and - click the chart, 73% of the poor, or poor families own a car. If that seems high, 42% own their home. The "poor" numbers are counted BEFORE welfare and any other assistance. Not after.

In particular, click the chart on living space per capita that compares the US poor with high incomes families of other industrialized nations. Not to start a debate on incomes of nations, but the count of "poverty" numbers in the US is typically absurd.




Erik Pathfinder
Caldari
M. Corp
-Mostly Harmless-
Posted - 2007.10.28 03:51:00 - [86]
 

Edited by: Erik Pathfinder on 28/10/2007 03:51:08
@ Insidi Us,

I'm a Dane, living in San Diego.

If you would like someone to practice your Danish with, send me an in-game mail.

I would be happy to correspond with you (e-mail or otherwise). Smile

Sean Dillon
Caldari
Surreal corp
Posted - 2007.10.28 10:20:00 - [87]
 

Last time I was in Denmark I was a little kid and visited Legoland, that was very fun. I think the park is closed these days.

The day after I took the boat to Oslo and spend a holiday in the fjords of norway, also a very beautifull region.

If you like the cold weather and lots of rain every year, and an almost always white cristmass you should go live in norway or denmarkWink

Le Cardinal
Spricer
Raiden.
Posted - 2007.10.29 11:23:00 - [88]
 

Originally by: Sean Dillon
Last time I was in Denmark I was a little kid and visited Legoland, that was very fun. I think the park is closed these days.

The day after I took the boat to Oslo and spend a holiday in the fjords of norway, also a very beautifull region.

If you like the cold weather and lots of rain every year, and an almost always white cristmass you should go live in norway or denmarkWink


Im from Norway and i live on the wast coast. No white christmas here Sad

You have to go in the midlands or up north. Used to be much snow when i was a kid, but the climate has changed.

Jack Thurner
Caldari
Terran Legacy
Posted - 2007.10.29 11:43:00 - [89]
 

Originally by: Ademaro Imre
Edited by: Ademaro Imre on 28/10/2007 03:23:31
Edited by: Ademaro Imre on 28/10/2007 03:21:47
Originally by: Cipher7


When people are "poor" in America it means they can't afford an Xbox.


You mean an an Xbox, accessories, cable internet, 3 controllers and 60 games.

This is what its like to be poor in the USA.

and - click the chart, 73% of the poor, or poor families own a car. If that seems high, 42% own their home. The "poor" numbers are counted BEFORE welfare and any other assistance. Not after.

In particular, click the chart on living space per capita that compares the US poor with high incomes families of other industrialized nations. Not to start a debate on incomes of nations, but the count of "poverty" numbers in the US is typically absurd.





They forgot to meantion all the trailer parks :P (thus it's not that expensive to own your own "house")

Please visit your user settings to re-enable images.

Der Komissar
Posted - 2007.10.29 12:42:00 - [90]
 

I suggest Sweden's Malmö. It has very rich culture.



LaughingLaughing


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