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Zharhov
Posted - 2010.10.02 22:24:00 - [1]
 

(This may be a bad time to post this, seeing as how everyone is still riled up over the patch, but I’m going to go ahead anyway. Prepare for what may become a TLDR.)

First off, I’m going to address any confusion that may come up by stating right away that I am 17, and therefore I am obviously less knowledgeable on this subject than many of you more experienced capsuleers out there. Therefore, I come before you in my time of need, humbly seeking your expertise. I love gaming, which is why I play EVE. This love of gaming has in turn given rise to a strong interest in computers. For many years I have been forced to use a “family” PC, sharing my only means of hobby with my abhorrent siblings and technologically impaired parents. But now, the time has come for me to throw off the shackles of destitute, and commit to what is sure to be one of the most important choices I will ever have to make – It is time for me to buy my own computer!

Ok, well maybe it won’t be the most important choice I’ll have to make, but it is sure to be an expensive one. Anyways, as you can probably tell by the title of this post, I’m looking for some helpful advice as I proceed to purchase my first (official) computer. Now that I have a job, I possess a steady income as a means to save up for a computer (of course I’ll be putting some money aside for important things like college, gas, and PLEX as well). I guess my two options would be to either buy a computer or build one. The benefit of buying a computer is obvious – I would have instant gratification and the insurance of a warranty if anything should go wrong. Building my own computer would be a great learning experience, and would probably be cheaper. However, I am afraid that if I build my own computer I will screw up and be out of luck. I have read up on building computers on the internet and I do own a few books on the subject, yet actually implementing the knowledge learned is an entirely different matter than simply reading about it.

So this is where I need help. Should I build my own computer, or just buy one? My budget is currently around 2000 USD; however I am willing to go over if the need arises. If buying one would be the best option, who should I buy from? So far I have looked at Alienware, Falcon Northwest, CyberPower, and Apple, as well as a few others. The 27” Core i7 iMac is sexy as hell, and the fact that they use EVE to showcase its gaming capabilities is very appealing (damn Apple and their marketing prowess!). Of course, Macs aren’t exactly known for their gaming abilities, and the machine’s graphics are less than impressive. I’ve always dreamed of owning an Alienware, and they are very nice looking platforms. However, ever since Alienware was bought out by Dell they have become slightly less appealing to me than they used to be. I’ve heard very good things about some of the independent enthusiast brands out there, and I was wondering if anyone who has had experience with them would recommend that I look into any specific brand or build.

If building my own computer would be the best option, I would appreciate some suggestions as to where I should buy parts. I was also wondering if anyone could recommend any “fits”. The idea of buying specific parts is a daunting prospect, and if I had a “shopping list” it would be much less intimidating. Maybe once I have experience building my own computers it will be easier for me to judge which components I should buy, but for now some suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Now that you have heard my humble plea, go ahead and laugh at my incompetence and inexperience all you want. However, if you feel willing to provide some helpful insight, by all means go ahead – it would be greatly appreciated :)

(In before Mac VS PC Trollageddon – please keep it civil...)

Professor Tarantula
Hedion University
Posted - 2010.10.02 22:31:00 - [2]
 

Originally by: Zharhov
Should I build my own computer, or just buy one? My budget is currently around 2000 USD


That's all the resident techies really need to know.

Zharhov
Posted - 2010.10.02 22:35:00 - [3]
 

Originally by: Professor Tarantula
That's all the resident techies really need to know.


TLDR Version : Should I build my own computer, or just buy one? My budget is currently around 2000 USD.

HeIIfire11
Posted - 2010.10.02 22:46:00 - [4]
 

Edited by: HeIIfire11 on 02/10/2010 22:54:08
Edited by: HeIIfire11 on 02/10/2010 22:48:35


I built my own.But..If you have 2000 usd at hand,go buy one.Alienware sounds good to be honest.
Building one is something I would do If you have someone to help you,and knows what they are doing.A lot can go wrong.

Leave the mac alone..its for advanced users and not supported by alot of games without going through a mission.

optional-
Oh yeah..save yourself some stress and go 32 bit os and not 64.This is my opinion.I still run xp and never have problems.If you want to run dx 10 you will need to get vista or windows 7.Also xp doesnt support more than 3 gigs ram.Again my opinion,you dont really need more because xp doent hog it like vista or 7 does.

Abdiel Kavash
Caldari
Paladin Order
Fidelas Constans
Posted - 2010.10.02 22:49:00 - [5]
 

I would really, really advise getting (at least) two monitors. Half the fun in EVE is looking at spreadsheets, guides, forums, webpages while playing (or playing flash games while mining). And if you stick around, you will eventually want a second account.

bassie12bf1
Posted - 2010.10.02 23:37:00 - [6]
 

Originally by: HeIIfire11
Edited by: HeIIfire11 on 02/10/2010 22:54:08
Edited by: HeIIfire11 on 02/10/2010 22:48:35


I built my own.But..If you have 2000 usd at hand,go buy one.Alienware sounds good to be honest.
Building one is something I would do If you have someone to help you,and knows what they are doing.A lot can go wrong.

Leave the mac alone..its for advanced users and not supported by alot of games without going through a mission.

optional-
Oh yeah..save yourself some stress and go 32 bit os and not 64.This is my opinion.I still run xp and never have problems.If you want to run dx 10 you will need to get vista or windows 7.Also xp doesnt support more than 3 gigs ram.Again my opinion,you dont really need more because xp doent hog it like vista or 7 does.

Unless you got an old PC no reason to stay with XP.

Win 7 64-Bit runs without trouble on any decent PC.

Teufelblatt
Posted - 2010.10.03 00:04:00 - [7]
 

Edited by: Teufelblatt on 03/10/2010 00:04:41
http://www.5min.com/Video/How-to-Build-Your-Own-PC-6867

Watch that video. Putting your own computer is not hard, and takes about 30 minutes to 2 hours(not including installing the operating system and any other software you might want/have)

Price things on the internet(or local store) and see if you can build something that's going to be better or cheaper than what you can buy prebuilt. If there isn't, there's not much in building it yourself except experience. And most components have a warranty too, but you can't just send the whole thing in to be fixed you have to find out which part is bad and then send that in.(It's usually not too hard to find out which part is bad or having problems.)

As far as mac vs pc goes. Mac is a slightly better operating system and windows has game support. It really comes down to personal preference and what you want to do with your computer. If you don't plan to play anything other than EVE you can't really go wrong either way.

Astald Ohtar
AtlantiA French Corp
Yulai Federation
Posted - 2010.10.03 00:38:00 - [8]
 

Building your own computer require a lot of knowledge , its not like you are gonna build it with your own hands,i think most stores have a guy that can do that for small fee , some like to do it by themselves , avoid it if you are not experienced , because you can fry your brand new CPU .

The the most important is choosing parts, well you need start by reading a lot of magazines, and pick up the most important piece of hardware - The Mother board, why is it important ? because everything fits in it , it like the t3 ship hull in eve =). It has to be able to run any new stuff for the next 2-3 years so you can upgrade your PC later .

DO the same thing for all the other parts , avoid over expensive stuff , not worth it since they will be obsolete after a couple years , better save money and upgrade later, hence the good choice of the motherboard.

Cant give you advice about what to read , im not used to read the reviews in English , may be tom's hardware? well something alike that gives an idea about the market.

But if you are lazy, just buy an alien-ware =p

Stick Cult
Posted - 2010.10.03 01:43:00 - [9]
 

Edited by: Stick Cult on 03/10/2010 01:44:31
Building your own PC is really easy. You plug a few things into a few other things, clip this into that, and that's basically it. If you've ever put new RAM in your computer and/or replaced the video card or something, which is easy to begin with, you can easily build one. Of course, it's easier if you have a friend who knows what they're doing, just in case.

Building vs. Buying: Building will be cheaper and more reliable. Buying will be faster, but in my experience lower quality. If you're worried about a warranty, almost anything you buy will still have a warranty, you'll just have to go to different companies for different pieces, and can't just send it in.

What to buy.. You need: Ram (DDR3 with your budget, probably 6 or 8 gigs), Motherboard (make sure it matches your RAM and CPU), CPU (Intel i7 maybe?), Video Card, Power Supply, Case, Hard Drive (1 terabyte is cheap and should be plenty), DVD (Blu-Ray?) Drive, Mouse, Keyboard, Monitor, Operating System (Get Windows 7). You might want: Extra fans (my case came with some, not sure about others), A better heatsink for your CPU (A basic one will come with the CPU), umm some other stuff...

I'm terrible at buying things to a price, so I'm not going to list anything specific.. Razz

Buy things from Newegg

also, obligatory lol u noob

edit: if you're look at the top of the line, buy the next one down. It won't be that much worse, and will be much cheaper.

Azrukhal
Posted - 2010.10.03 01:51:00 - [10]
 

Definitely build your own. It's easy, fun, and satisfying! Very Happy

Ascendic
Macabre Votum
Morsus Mihi
Posted - 2010.10.03 03:32:00 - [11]
 

If you are considering Apple products, I am not even going to bother.

There is no hope for you.

Stick Cult
Posted - 2010.10.03 03:45:00 - [12]
 

Originally by: Ascendic
If you are considering Apple products, I am not even going to bother.

There is no hope for you.

Apple computers are great, but you're not not for gaming, simply because of the OS constraints.

Ascendic
Macabre Votum
Morsus Mihi
Posted - 2010.10.03 03:50:00 - [13]
 

Edited by: Ascendic on 03/10/2010 03:51:51
Originally by: Stick Cult
Originally by: Ascendic
If you are considering Apple products, I am not even going to bother.

There is no hope for you.

Apple computers are great, but you're not not for gaming, simply because of the OS constraints.


......you do realize they use the same parts PC's do with higher prices right?

It is not the computer that makes a shred of difference it is the OS and even the OS I hate personally but lets be honest here, the OS is the only thing driving it that makes any difference and even that is simple an over priced unix distro. Apple knows if they sold their OS separately their PC division would become bankrupt, hence why their PC's are locked up like fort knox.

Stick Cult
Posted - 2010.10.03 04:07:00 - [14]
 

Originally by: Ascendic
Edited by: Ascendic on 03/10/2010 03:51:51
Originally by: Stick Cult
Originally by: Ascendic
If you are considering Apple products, I am not even going to bother.

There is no hope for you.

Apple computers are great, but you're not not for gaming, simply because of the OS constraints.


......you do realize they use the same parts PC's do with higher prices right?

It is not the computer that makes a shred of difference it is the OS and even the OS I hate personally but lets be honest here, the OS is the only thing driving it that makes any difference and even that is simple an over priced unix distro. Apple knows if they sold their OS separately their PC division would become bankrupt, hence why their PC's are locked up like fort knox.

Yes I realize it's the same components. My view on it is Pre-Built PC's (Dell, etc) < Mac < Custom-Built. In the case of laptops, you can't custom build them, so Macs are better, unless you are really set on getting a gaming laptop (for some strange reason).

I had a Dell laptop, the power supply (the cord, not an internal part) broke within 6 months, and for some reason wasn't under the warranty, so there's another $100 for a new one. Another few months, and some part of the motherboard or cooling or something broke, which required probably 6 or 8 hours talking to support over a weekend (3 days) to even get them to send me a box so I can get the thing fixed.

Got a Macbook Pro 2 years ago. Yes, it cost 3 times as much as the Dell (going from a mid-range Dell to a high-end Mac). They are expensive. But in 2 years, I've only recently had to replace the battery, which is acceptable after a few years of use. Worked flawlessly the rest of the time.

Of course I also have a gaming PC I built myself, which is simply awesome. Paid much less than I would've for a comparable Dell/Alienware or HP or whatever, and worked great.

I don't really have a preference on Windows over Mac OS, but I know my way around how a PC works better, just because I've used them for years and years, and only a Mac for 2.

Ascendic
Macabre Votum
Morsus Mihi
Posted - 2010.10.03 04:15:00 - [15]
 

It is all experience. All electronics fail. Some more so than others. In the end bad experiences will make people change brands but in all honesty until manufacturers start using good quality and good brand name parts instead of generic and oem they will always break no matter what brand you choose. I have had an IBM P3 450 that still works from 10 years ago. I know people who have had brand names that I consider garbage and never had problems, and others who have quality computers that have had problems. **** happens. But paying a higher price for the same quality is ridiculous. Apple does not user better quality parts. You merely got lucky.

Even good quality parts fail some times. That is the nature of electronics. If all components were built with extremely high quality and reliability PC's would no longer be PC's because no one would be able to afford one. Apple was alright when they have the G processors. Now it is the same crap that Dell and HP and all the other companies push out just rebranded and marked up higher.

Kizahhan
Posted - 2010.10.03 04:40:00 - [16]
 

Cyberpower is ok, sometimes its cheaper to buy for them, then get stuff from newegg and build it.

Falcon Northwest.. are they still around?

Alienware ... way over priced but look cool

apple... never used one

Newegg has some pre-built gaming computers from cyberpower and Ibuypower check them out.



alittlebirdy
Posted - 2010.10.03 05:38:00 - [17]
 

Really only you know if you can build a PC or not, really not super hard, make sure everything works with eachother, ground yourself, don't force parts, and follow the directions (hell my MOBO came with a little 1 2 3 4 flip out book on the CPU socket on how to install the CPU).

Biulding gives you more room to expand and get better quality parts (remember most inportant part of the PC is the PSU) once you start getting into gamining pre-built will be a rip.

You never say when you want to biuld/buy this PC so, next month drops the AMD 6xxx cards, should drop amd / nvidia prices. Q1 of 2011 comes socket 1155 for intel, sandy bridge, wait if you so choose, current 1156 board will not work.

2grand is also way past what you would need, for eve, I have a stock 470, it pulls maybe 35% load with eve... (capped at 60fps)

If you aint gona biuld i ainit gona lay out anything, so quicky i7 w/ 8gigs of ram at least, socket 1156, 470 or 2x 460's. If you are gona build (buy) now I'll make up a better biuld.

Mr Kidd
Posted - 2010.10.03 12:35:00 - [18]
 

My friend this is one of those situations where if you have to ask you probably should buy a computer. Not build it. Competitively, pre-build computers are well worth the slight increase in pricing. Performance, well, you generally will get more performance from a system you build yourself as you are hopefully knowledgeable of the capabilities of the hardware you're purchasing spending more on some components while spending less on others based on specifications and need.

You can build a competent system for under $1,200....even under $1,000. Do not buy bleeding edge. You are paying way more for the bleeding than any edge you may have over slightly more mature hardware. In most cases, mature vs bleeding edge means 5 - 10 FPS. Bells and whistles cost money. If you're a frugal person you'll look for a good and practical case, not a fancy "ooh I paid way too much" case with all the lights and gizmos. Fancy cases do not add to performance but they do jack up the expense. You're only looking for good cooling which means places for plenty of case fans, preferably for 120mm fans (quieter). Don't skimp on the quality of the power supply but don't buy more wattage than you need. Give a little room for addition of components later but not too much. A poor quality PSU will hurt you in the long run.

As for the actual guts of the computer....way too many choices out there. That is something you really need to look for yourself, determine which hardware you want and then you can come back and ask more questions.

Monitors, prolly want 2 as others have stated. Although I don't have experience with OLED monitors I would suspect they might run a little cooler than LCD. Might want to look into that. OLED is the future for monitors anyway.

Don't forget a good Desk and Chair. Which with $2,000 in pocket you can probably squeeze in as well.

Jaqel Broadside
Posted - 2010.10.03 13:11:00 - [19]
 

Building your computer is great fun and very rewarding as long as you prepare, are patient and plan.

If you do want to build talk with others who have already built, even better go help someone who is building a system.

Get equipped with a grounding wrist band, a good set of screw drivers, thermal compund, cleaning fluid and a good set of tools. A head torch helps too.

Consider buying a 1080P TV instead of a monitor, monitors are expensive and a good 1080P TV is just as good and can be used as a TV 8)

Try to buy equipment that you can re-use on the next build, my 1st build case was too small - which led to me butchering the graphics card cables. Buy the biggest one you can afford with good cable storage and good thermal conductivity. Buy right here and you will save on the next build. Same with the power supply. Plan that motherboards and graphics cards are going to get bigger, get a power supply larger than you need.

Buy a good set of large fans and run them at lower speeds,, this will maek for a much quieter system. Buy some spare Fans because there is nothing worse than trying to find spares for an old system when you could be up and running today.

The most important items are a good graphics card and memory. The CPU and motherboard are less important unless you want bragging rights. Do not go for the best you can get,, the dramtic scaling of CPUs tells you everything,, I bought a 765 AMD chip and it more than matches my needs,, however I think I should have bought a better graphics card,,, you live and learn.

Get the keyboard and mouse that matches you needs,, be aware these wear out so IMHO dont go over the top.

IMHO dont bother with HDMI connections,, they are expensive and from my 1080P provide a worse picture.

Yunassy
Posted - 2010.10.03 15:43:00 - [20]
 

It seems you don't have any experience building a computer, that's alright you will have to learn,the best way in your situation would be buying that flashy new comp and try to find a second hand or old comp which you can fiddle with, without having the risk you might toast your new components. Others said it as well, building your own comp demands a lot of reading,time and patience. Myself I have build my comps over the years and it gets easier evrytime and mostly outperforms the retail comps plus it's cheaper if you know where to look.There are enough sites on the net who can give you the basics of comp building and your local store is also a good starting point.Good luck and fly safe ;)

Taedrin
Gallente
Kushan Industrial
Posted - 2010.10.03 16:15:00 - [21]
 

Originally by: Mr Kidd
My friend this is one of those situations where if you have to ask you probably should buy a computer. Not build it. Competitively, pre-build computers are well worth the slight increase in pricing. Performance, well, you generally will get more performance from a system you build yourself as you are hopefully knowledgeable of the capabilities of the hardware you're purchasing spending more on some components while spending less on others based on specifications and need.

You can build a competent system for under $1,200....even under $1,000. Do not buy bleeding edge. You are paying way more for the bleeding than any edge you may have over slightly more mature hardware. In most cases, mature vs bleeding edge means 5 - 10 FPS. Bells and whistles cost money. If you're a frugal person you'll look for a good and practical case, not a fancy "ooh I paid way too much" case with all the lights and gizmos. Fancy cases do not add to performance but they do jack up the expense. You're only looking for good cooling which means places for plenty of case fans, preferably for 120mm fans (quieter). Don't skimp on the quality of the power supply but don't buy more wattage than you need. Give a little room for addition of components later but not too much. A poor quality PSU will hurt you in the long run.

As for the actual guts of the computer....way too many choices out there. That is something you really need to look for yourself, determine which hardware you want and then you can come back and ask more questions.

Monitors, prolly want 2 as others have stated. Although I don't have experience with OLED monitors I would suspect they might run a little cooler than LCD. Might want to look into that. OLED is the future for monitors anyway.

Don't forget a good Desk and Chair. Which with $2,000 in pocket you can probably squeeze in as well.


I disagree. Learning how to build a computer is a great way to learn about computers, how to repair them, etc etc... If you can build a computer, then you will have learned how to replace various computer parts, which can save you HUNDREDS of dollars in the long run. Not to mention that you will learn about all of the various technologies and the differences between them through research.

As for OLED monitors...

That is still bleeding edge technology. You will be spending thousands on an OLED monitor when you can spend a couple hundred dollars on an LCD.

CCP Navigator


C C P
C C P Alliance
Posted - 2010.10.03 17:24:00 - [22]
 

Moved from General Discussion to Out of Pod Experience.

illford baker
STK Scientific
IT Alliance
Posted - 2010.10.03 18:54:00 - [23]
 

well, if you are going to build your own it has to be windows or linux, you cannot legally, or easily build your own mac (one of its faults). i would suggest you build your own PC, they last longer as you just upgrade each part as they get out of date, overclock it for better performance, and fix it faster and cheaper because you know whats going on (no more geek squad).

Yesh
Unjustified Ancients of MuMu
Posted - 2010.10.03 19:09:00 - [24]
 

Originally by: Zharhov




Dude, your face .... head and shoulders

Something Random
Gallente
The Barrow Boys
Posted - 2010.10.03 19:19:00 - [25]
 

Edited by: Something Random on 03/10/2010 19:32:44
To be able to build your own PC all you need actually do is bury your head in a few technical editorials in a good computer magazine - why? so you learn the current technologies, the 'whats important' of the computer biz. You must know about the chips - the motherboards - the various flavours of pin arrangement on processors and the differences in RAM technologies. To be honest good online or printed magazine materials will give you this knowledge quite quickly.

Once you have that and have decided on the Processor, RAM, Video Card, Motherboard, Power Supply and all your flavours of Media devices - the actual building of the computer is quite easy, almost every plug has only one way of fitting - if it has many then it doesnt matter where it goes usually.

The normal course of proceedings is as such :
Get your case open.
Isolate yourself from static charges
Fit your power supply - its heavy and bashing delicate electronics with it is not clever.
Screw in your motherboard.
Put your Media devices in - actually they can even go in before the mobo but theres less chance you will bash anything with them anyway.
Install your Ram (tip here can be to plug your PSU in at this point briefly for easy earthing from static, just touch the psu casing) - be careful
Install your processor - be careful, tricky points here can be getting the heatsink on, follow the instructions !!! yes, read the instructions !!!
Now wire it up to the point you are - mobo wiring first, media wiring second.
Add you GFX - wire it up, never forget it usually needs a power source.

DOUBLE CHECK EVERYTHING.

Enjoy the fact you just got everything you wished for in a PC.

Alternatively you can read some pre-made solutions for the closest that will match your wishes and wait for delivery. You never get everything you wanted though.

Oh - leave the overclocking out till your more experienced - surefire way to kill a new computer if you dont REALLY know what your doing. To get to know what your doing read online resources - you will have to learn a little electronics and electrical engineering to consider yourself safe to go ahead (its specific - not like you need a degree course).

(EDIT) Quickly noting that motherboard plugging in is also made easier by every socket/interface being colour coded - for instance RAM banks that will work in dual channel, SATA 600/300, USB 3.0/USB 2.0 etc etc. The manual will reveal all - yes, i said READ THE MANUAL again Laughing

Zharhov
Posted - 2010.10.03 19:53:00 - [26]
 

Wow, thanks for all the feedback everyone. The general consensus seems to be that I should build my own computer, and I believe that is what I am going to do. I guess I should start by reading more on the topic. If anyone would like to suggest any good magazines or online editorials, or any other helpful resources that would be great. Thanks again for all the help, it is much appreciated.

SFX Bladerunner
Minmatar
Aperture Science inc.
Posted - 2010.10.03 20:44:00 - [27]
 

Edited by: SFX Bladerunner on 03/10/2010 20:46:00
Originally by: Zharhov
Originally by: Professor Tarantula
That's all the resident techies really need to know.


TLDR Version : Should I build my own computer, or just buy one? My budget is currently around 2000 USD.



Most people that have a big budget to spend on their PC make the mistake of thinking they might as well get a pre-configured (alienware/dell/whatever) PC because they believe at this amount of cash the added money gains from seeking the parts yourself to drive down costs is less relevant.

They are wrong.

The only reason you are allowed to buy a pre-configured PC (in my book) is when you are either buying a laptop or you don't care about getting good value/money and are a LAZY son of a *****.


I recon for that money you should get something like:

- Core i7 quad core
- good mobo with lots of connectivity (I personally like ASUS boards)
- 8-16gb DDR3 memory (2x4GB, 3x4GB, 4x4GB, 2x8GB)
- single GTX480/GTX460 SLI/GTX 480 SLI (or equivalent AMD solutions if that's your thing)
- SATA SSD of about 50-120gb
- 4x 2TB (green 5400 RPM versions) HDDS connected on a PCI raid card in RAID5
- X-Fi/whatever audio card (if you don't like on-board audio)

Monitor(s), mouse, keyboard and case are all up to own preference naturally, although I personally recommend dual 24" 1920x1200 monitors.


Something like that should fit into your budget nicely, adjust tiers to liking to even out the cost and performances.
(if you prefer processing power over memory speed/size pick a better (moar GHZ) cpu from the i7 line and pick slower/less memory)





illford baker
STK Scientific
IT Alliance
Posted - 2010.10.03 20:50:00 - [28]
 

Edited by: illford baker on 03/10/2010 20:58:06
Originally by: Zharhov
Wow, thanks for all the feedback everyone. The general consensus seems to be that I should build my own computer, and I believe that is what I am going to do. I guess I should start by reading more on the topic. If anyone would like to suggest any good magazines or online editorials, or any other helpful resources that would be great. Thanks again for all the help, it is much appreciated.

http://www.maximumpc.com/article/features/how_build_ultimate_gaming_pc_step_step
newegg.com is a good shop for excellent priced computer parts, you might find a better deal somewhere, but newegg usually has the best price.

Mr Kidd
Posted - 2010.10.03 21:20:00 - [29]
 

Edited by: Mr Kidd on 03/10/2010 21:48:03
Edited by: Mr Kidd on 03/10/2010 21:42:54
Originally by: Taedrin

I disagree. Learning how to build a computer is a great way to learn about computers
As for OLED monitors...
That is still bleeding edge technology. You will be spending thousands on an OLED monitor when you can spend a couple hundred dollars on an LCD.


I didn't tell him not to. I only suggested he might consider pre-built. It all depends on his current knowledge level, willingness to learn and ability to learn, certainly.

As for OLED, meh, what do I know? I bought a 21" Viewsonic P810 CRT on Craigslist for $15 because my $200 LCD irritates my eyes. All I do know is: OLED is where it's going ;)

Quote:
Wow, thanks for all the feedback everyone. The general consensus seems to be that I should build my own computer, and I believe that is what I am going to do. I guess I should start by reading more on the topic. If anyone would like to suggest any good magazines or online editorials, or any other helpful resources that would be great. Thanks again for all the help, it is much appreciated.


A quick start to learning about what CPUs/memory fit what motherboards is to go to sites selling combo's (of which you might want to buy). From there you can get a general feel for the type of cpu's, memories and motherboards their interfaces, etc, etc, etc. Then you can google the things talked about within the "specifications" sections of those ads and learn what they are. Since I tend to extend my computer purchases to about every 5 years during which I upgrade components to get more performance (i.e. memory, cpu, gpu, hard drive), I'm a little behind the times when I finally hit the upgrade wall and must rebuild from the ground up. And this is exactly what I do to get up to speed about the newer technologies. However you learn about it just take your time and don't rush into a purchase because you want it NOW. The first step is to choose what brand CPU you want, Intel/AMD. This will dictate which motherboards you purchase which dictates what memory you purchase. Chosing Intel or AMD is predicated on, in my case, preference or more wisely current benchmarking. I've used AMD for over a decade and have been happy enough to continue doing so without much question. However, you may feel differently. Just know not to buy bleeding edge. There is a definitely performance/cost ratio where you get the most bang for your buck. Try to identify it. I've found it is generally at about the 1 year range after a particular type of hardware's release, maybe a little older like 18mos. You might find it otherwise. Things not to skimp on: CPU, Memory, Motherboard, GPU, PSU, Hard drive. The rest, well, you can skimp.

Motherboards, brand names counts. This is an area where people generally have brand loyalty. So, I will only say that I use Asus and leave it at that.

As far as memory is concerned more is not necessarily better. Your usage determines your need. Brand names count. If you don't overclock then their mid-grade chips will suffice. If I were building a computer today to run Eve in order to run multiple clients I would at a minimum get 4GB, preferably 6GB or 8GB. One Eve client can utilize just over 1GB of RAM or more.

GPU's usually at the $100 - $150 range are more than adequate, for Eve. You can certainly spend more and perhaps you should. Your usage will determine the need. Nvidia and ATI are the major players and the only two I would buy though I stick to Nvidia.

PSU, quality counts. Wattage is not to be confused with quality. Wattage is determined by need. There are wattage calculators on the net to help you determine your need.

Harddrive - 7200 RPM is what you want. I only buy Segate or Western Digital. Over the years I've found them to be more reliable. Other's may disagree.

Hope this helps!

SFX Bladerunner
Minmatar
Aperture Science inc.
Posted - 2010.10.03 21:21:00 - [30]
 

Edited by: SFX Bladerunner on 03/10/2010 21:25:52
Originally by: Zharhov
helpful resources


SEPARATELY SOLD PC HARDWARE COMPONENT LIST:
- Power Supply Unit (PSU)
- (Case) Fan(s)/Ventilator(s)
- Computer Case (Housing): sometimes comes with pre-installed PSU and/or fan(s)
- Motherboard/Mainboard: sometimes/often comes with integrated chipsets like most notably a Network Card (NIC), Graphics Adapter (GFX, videocard) and (HD) On-Board Audio (Audio Card)
- Processor (Central Processing Unit (CPU))
- Memory Stick(s) (Memory, DDR2/3 etc)
- Video Card (Graphics Adapter, GFX card, Graphical Processing Unit (GPU))
- Hard Disk Drive (HDD, SSD)
- Optical Disc Drive(s): DVD(-RW)/Blue-ray(-RW) Disc Drives/Players
- (Display) Monitor(s): sometimes come with built-in speakers
- Keyboard
- Mouse
- Speaker System/Speakers
(- Headphones)
(- Headset: combines headphones and microphone)
(- Webcam (Cam): often has built-in microphone)
(- PCI(-E) RAID Controller Card: to plug HDD's into to build a RAID array)
(- CPU/GPU Heatsink&Fan System: Sometimes the stock CPU/GPU air-cooling solution just doesn't cut it)
(- Front Panel (Fan) Controller/Interface: Something to read information from your system and/or control your (case) fans with)
((- Watercooling System: Collection of parts needed to build a watercooling solution for your CPU and/or GPU))
((- Casemods/Casemodding Parts: Everything from fan filters and side-panel display windows to neon connection cables and neon tubes))

Those are all the parts needed to build your own PC from bare use PC to extreme enthusiast Gamer/Pimping PC.

If you like this list and it's general layout and think you would like to learn more from me feel free to reply here or drop me an evemail and I'll give you more information like Part specific features and advantages/disadvantages of current on-market products with in-depth analysis of price/performance ratios, usability, projected life-span expectancies and inter-part compatibility.

If that sounded exciting and informative to you, do drop me a line.
If that sounded like garble**** and you fell-asleep mid-through don't bother and google some basic tutorials (I like talking and explaining computers but only in my own method)Laughing


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