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Mr Ravenblade
RLSH Holdings
Caped Vigilantes
Posted - 2010.02.16 23:08:00 - [1]
 

Edited by: Mr Ravenblade on 16/02/2010 23:17:20
As a newer player who can not yet fly the "big ships" like the titan or capitals, how can I best make a real difference, create change, or otherwise have an effect in eve?

The marketing to become a capsuleer always chooses to talk about how one person can make a difference, do extraordinary things, take on the world, etc.. but I really do not see a lot of that being *allowed* by the social elements because they see new players as worthless due to this lack of skills. The further budgetary constraints created by the sheer cost of many of the "good ships" and the skill books that enable them further complicates this issue.

So how am I supposed to do big things in eve, make an impact, etc, without working in a ore belt for 3 years to get the isk and the skills to fly capitals?

Edit:
No this is not a troll, I honestly want to know what I can DO to be not only the most useful, but also make a real impact like the game marketing says is possible.

The AEther
Caldari
Agony Unleashed
Agony Empire
Posted - 2010.02.16 23:19:00 - [2]
 

Join a good corp and help build it. You don't need to have xx millions of skill points on your character to help with such things as recruitment or scheduling & running different corp events like frigate tournaments or mining ops, no need to own capital ship to find and scramble targets in a frigate for you pvp corpmates, no need to have played the game for years to have out-of-box ideas. Then there are people who post blogs about their adventures for others to read, create signatures and artwork for the game. I remember a guy in one of the alliances I've been in who rarely logged into the game and was always broke and loaning ISK from CEO, but he created an awesome website for the ally and a few really nice 3rd party applications for EVE.

Contrary to popular newbie opinion that no corp will have you until you have played a couple of months, many corporations in recruitment channel and recruitment forum do not have any skill points limits and will take you in if you make positive impression during the interview.

Estel Arador
Posted - 2010.02.16 23:19:00 - [3]
 

You assume that you must fly a big thing to have an impact.

But you don't have to fly a Titan, you could also have an impact just by flying an interdictor and tackling Titan, or in thousands of other ways.

You seem to be very unimaginative in what you consider to be 'a real difference, create change, or otherwise have an effect'. I like to think I have an impact on many EVE players directly and indirectly by the sheer amount of jumpclones which have been created via my free service (5500+ players used it). That didn't require years of training or billions of isk, all it required was a good idea and a decent implementation.

Serge Bastana
Gallente
GWA Corp
Posted - 2010.02.16 23:23:00 - [4]
 

Simple answer is get involved, opportunities will present themselves as you progress. You may not be the center of a grand drama like sometimes happens in EVE but you may be involved in some great tales that you can tell.

Equus
Nemesis Nation
Posted - 2010.02.16 23:23:00 - [5]
 

First thing I would recommend is figure out what you want to do first, you already state you don't want to mine so would you prefer to mission or do you think you want to get into PvP? It's totally up to you, picka goal and work towards it, there are many ways to be useful once you have a goal, it also makes it easier to help you out when you explain exactly where you want to make an impact Razz

Tulisin Dragonflame
Posted - 2010.02.17 01:25:00 - [6]
 

Originally by: Mr Ravenblade
Edited by: Mr Ravenblade on 16/02/2010 23:17:20
As a newer player who can not yet fly the "big ships" like the titan or capitals, how can I best make a real difference, create change, or otherwise have an effect in eve?

The marketing to become a capsuleer always chooses to talk about how one person can make a difference, do extraordinary things, take on the world, etc.. but I really do not see a lot of that being *allowed* by the social elements because they see new players as worthless due to this lack of skills. The further budgetary constraints created by the sheer cost of many of the "good ships" and the skill books that enable them further complicates this issue.

So how am I supposed to do big things in eve, make an impact, etc, without working in a ore belt for 3 years to get the isk and the skills to fly capitals?

Edit:
No this is not a troll, I honestly want to know what I can DO to be not only the most useful, but also make a real impact like the game marketing says is possible.


CCP actually likes to emphasize the butterfly effect a single player can have on a highly interconnected world. It isn't about you gunning down a hundred ships by yourself, but rather influencing the big picture in your own small way.

Lets say a month-old player fits up a rifter. He goes out to lowsec and finds a cruiser speeding along towards its destination. In a hurry, the cruiser just attempt to pass through the system, but the rifter tackles it and tries to kill it. The cruiser turns on Newbie McRifter and kills him (not saying that'll always happen, but it does in this case).

That cruiser was rushing to the aid of a nearby friendly freighter full of PoS fuel. Due to the delay, he didn't make it in time to support his gang, and a cascade of fail befalls the freighter's defense, causing it to die.

The freighter was on the way to a station that was about to run out of fuel.

The station was about to finish building a super capital ship.

The super capital ship was about to be deployed into a large fleet to defend an entire region from an enemy alliance.

But for the newbie rifter, the region was lost.

An improbable scenario, to be sure, but a demonstration of how one "takes on the world" in their own way. Every action you make has impacts that make ripples across the universe.

Galius Zed
Posted - 2010.02.17 01:28:00 - [7]
 

Also suggest thinking about forming your own corp.

And don't think big corp either. Almost every single large corp started off small and some of the smallest corps can have the most fun.


Good luck vOv


Mr Ravenblade
RLSH Holdings
Caped Vigilantes
Posted - 2010.02.17 01:51:00 - [8]
 

Originally by: The AEther
Join a good corp and help build it.


The main issue with that goal is the distinct lack of trust in eve, and the fact that new players are often seen as simply spies or worse. I guess many people would consider this a feature of eve rather than a problem, but looking at game mechanics it would seem that trust and co-operation are rewarded far more than the alternative.

Originally by: The AEther

Contrary to popular newbie opinion that no corp will have you until you have played a couple of months, many corporations in recruitment channel and recruitment forum do not have any skill points limits and will take you in if you make positive impression during the interview.



I was told in my newbie corp chat that if a corp is desperate for new members, they can not really be considered to be "good" corps. Is this not the case? No, This is not a flame as I really want to know how a corp is best judged. I would love to be able to join a 'good' corp and help it grow, but I honestly am not aware of how best game mechanics plays a part in how that judgment is made. I'm also still so new to the game that I am not aware of all the politics that seem to also be a part of eve, outside of the fact that from reading the forums (Since I can not find a tutorial on it in game) they seem to be a major part of keeping an employment history in good standing. I honestly don't want to join the "wrong" corp or accidentally "choose the wrong side" by joining the wrong sort of corp with a bad rep.
Originally by: Estel Arador
You assume that you must fly a big thing to have an impact. But you don't have to fly a Titan, you could also have an impact just by flying an interdictor


That is what I see in the marketing and all over the forums; Its always capitals or at least skill intensive t2 ships. Even you just mentioned a ship that is t2 in nature. I have yet to see anything about the guy in the noobship turning the tide of an epic battle and saving the day. Is that even possible?

Originally by: Estel Arador

You seem to be very unimaginative


Heheheh, if only you knew. Unimaginative? Never :D.

I would however admit to being ignorant of eve, and the limitations imposed on its players. I guess I am still trying to get a sense of what is possible. And that is why I am asking these questions, to expand my knowledge a bit.

Its often better to learn from others mistakes than it is to have the expense or liability of making them yourself, after all :)

Originally by: Estel Arador

I like to think I have an impact on many EVE players directly and indirectly by the sheer amount of jumpclones which have been created via my free service (5500+ players used it). That didn't require years of training or billions of isk, all it required was a good idea and a decent implementation.


Well said, and good food for thought so thank you.

Originally by: Serge Bastana
Simple answer is get involved, opportunities will present themselves as you progress. You may not be the center of a grand drama like sometimes happens in EVE but you may be involved in some great tales that you can tell.


So what if being like the mega-alliance leaders is my goal? How best can I learn to do that sort of thing?

Originally by: Equus
First thing I would recommend is figure out what you want to do first, .... It's totally up to you, picka goal and work towards it,


I want to lead a eve-wide known alliance. I want to provide safe mining ops for the carebear who wants to mine, a good fight for people itching for a throwdown, and good space for people in the corp to use to escape the stress of life a little and just have fun. I want to surround myself with smart people of integrity that I actually enjoy spending my time with. I want to be fair, to help, to defend. I want to do the things ccp markets as possible on only a single game universe. I want to know that every second I spend logged in is worth the time away from family, duty, etc. I want to have fun.

Mara Abraham
Minmatar
The Tuskers
Posted - 2010.02.17 02:00:00 - [9]
 

Greetings Mr Ravenblade:

When I joined my first player run corp close to a month ago, I could only fly T1 ships with some T2 modules (I still cannot fly a battle ship).

When I found myself asking to join missions, I found out it was ok to be in a frigate or destroyer (later on a battle cruiser) as they ran level 4 missions as long as I paid attention to the fleet commander (FC) (which in frigs and destroyer's meant warping out and coming back if I got aggro), was fine.

When we were war dec'd, I offered to fly anything; and even though I never participated in pvp was asked to tackle. I followed their fitting instructions along with the FC instructions; and made my first kill (a 60,000,000ish isk purifier lost because I jumped on point). Later on when I lost my rifter, I was given a rifter and a vigil for tackling (both are still around).

Just be willing to volunteer and have fun knowing its just a game.

Thank you.

Serge Bastana
Gallente
GWA Corp
Posted - 2010.02.17 02:09:00 - [10]
 

Edited by: Serge Bastana on 17/02/2010 02:10:50
You're making it sound a bit like a job in some ways, keep your big goals in mind but be ready to accept that the leaders of the big alliances took a long while to get where they are now, years more likely. Perhaps try starting with smaller goals that you can achieve over weeks and months, then as you become more familiar with the game, make more contacts, find a corp you can work with, then start working on longer term goals.

If you set yourself the goal of leading an alliance and that's it, then you may feel frustrated in the months to come as this isn't going to happen overnight. If you give yourself something you can aim for in the next few weeks, then something in the next few months, it may begin to take shape. You never really know where this game will lead you, some unexpected event may give you opportunities you didn't plan for but are ready to take advantage of because you have a more fluid plan that allows you to take the opportunity.

And in the end, it's just a game, the idea is to have fun. EVE is a diversion, something to amuse us and enjoy, and as the saying goes, the best laid plans of mice and men....

Taross
Caldari
Laurentson INC
Posted - 2010.02.17 02:18:00 - [11]
 

Really sounds like what you wanna do is found your own corp. If so, go for it. But maybe not JUST YET...

I founded my own corp late last year, and it's doing alright. Part of what I did is easily repeatable: put a good recruitment thread in the appropriate section of the forum, make sure you keep it current, and bump it religiously the one time a day you're allowed...

But you'll miss an important part of what I had going for me... A network... For the dedicated megalomaniac, in this game as well as in real life, it's not WHAT you know, it's WHO you know... Half the members of my corp come from a group of people I used to hang out with earlier in highsec. My directors are guys I flew with in a previous corp. The 0.0 access I can offer is because a former corpmate of one of my directors now runs an alliance... our corp jumpfreighter was built cheaply by old friends of ANOTHER director...

Best way to work towards the power to change the galaxy is working on your network. You might be able to do some of that in NPC corp chat. There's all kinds of public chats you could join. Joining a large corp for new players, like EVE University, for a bit, might help as well... Hell, even forum posting...

Chainsaw Plankton
IDLE GUNS
IDLE EMPIRE
Posted - 2010.02.17 04:09:00 - [12]
 

Originally by: Mr Ravenblade
they see new players as worthless due to this lack of skills.

why do people keep saying this crap

oh right I know, lets tell new players they suck so they quit and we can have the game to ourselves MAHUAHUHUHUHAUUHAUHAUHUHAUHUA!

hell last thing you wanna do as a nub is get caught in one of them lagcrapouts

ah well if you really wanna lag out you can get in a dictor pretty fast, or a hac, hell just go have some fun in a t1 ship

ah well that's just one plankton's opinion

Zartanic
Posted - 2010.02.17 04:39:00 - [13]
 

Edited by: Zartanic on 17/02/2010 04:43:59



Forget everything said in new player chat or NPC corp chat, it's full of failed players who like the sound of their own voices and spout rubbish as a hobby.

Then, join a corp. If you don't like it, join another. In your early life corp hopping to find one you want is not as bad in EVE as other games. Having said that give all corps you join a chance, it will take time for them to get to know and trust you and it will take time for you to discover what you like to do.

Finally, muck in and learn. In EVE there is ALWAYS a solution to a problem. So never moan if something bad happens, just learn from it and see it as an opportunity to find out more about the game. You can't be a boss until you have learned how to clean the windows.

Finally forget 'levelling up' and 'bigger is better' as it's simply not the way EVE works. You would never consider using a Tech 2 ship for PVP until you have practised and practise in the Tech 1 variant (and named mods can be as good as Tech 2, sometimes better, with very little training) which gives you plenty of time to train the Tech 2.


It's good you have an aim in the game, its crucial really, but while you get to your goal please just have fun.

The AEther
Caldari
Agony Unleashed
Agony Empire
Posted - 2010.02.17 08:28:00 - [14]
 

Originally by: Mr Ravenblade
Originally by: The AEther
Join a good corp and help build it.
The main issue with that goal is the distinct lack of trust in eve, and the fact that new players are often seen as simply spies or worse.

Trust can be earned. Doing things like recruitment and scheduling some mining ops or frigate tournaments does not require any corp roles. You can start on this your very first weeks as member. Continued involvement will eventually prove your dedication. In most corps this will eventually lead to your promotion within corp or at least leadership will start seeing you as a very valuable member and not just another noob they recruited. You can never trust anyone 100% in this game, but typically if a corp member is contributing a lot of time and effort to corp goals they thus earn more trust.

Originally by: The AEther
I was told in my newbie corp chat that if a corp is desperate for new members, they can not really be considered to be "good" corps. Is this not the case?

No. I've been in some fun smallish newbie corps that recruited everyone, even people fresh off trial. And some elitist corps with some pretty stuck-up members and leadership that had some sort of personality issues & would yell at people on voice comms. So no, this is not the case.

Originally by: The AEther
No, This is not a flame as I really want to know how a corp is best judged. I would love to be able to join a 'good' corp and help it grow, but I honestly am not aware of how best game mechanics plays a part in how that judgment is made. I'm also still so new to the game that I am not aware of all the politics that seem to also be a part of eve, outside of the fact that from reading the forums (Since I can not find a tutorial on it in game) they seem to be a major part of keeping an employment history in good standing. I honestly don't want to join the "wrong" corp or accidentally "choose the wrong side" by joining the wrong sort of corp with a bad rep.

Your primary concern in choosing a corp should be 1) good alignement of corp goals with your own in-game goals and 2) a good social match so that interacting with people in corp wold actually be enjoyable for you.

It is difficult to end up on the "wrong side". Some players are prejudiced against pirate corps. Pirate corps never conceal that they are pirate corps. They always advertise this fact publically to attract players interested in piracy. So you cannot be accidentally pulled to the "wrong side" here. Besides that don't do things like corp theft, smacktalk others in local, post emorage threats on forums, join and leave multiple corps within a couple of days, and buy/sell characters on forums, etc. This is common sense stuff, however, and does not require thorough expereince with the game to understand how it can raise red flags to recruiters.

It is easy however to pick corporation that is not a good match for you socially or that will end up just wasting your time. There are no ways to avoid this 100%. Make sure you interview the recruiters you talk to. When I did recruitment it is amazing how many people don't ask questions back at you. But recruiters are basically advertisement agents for the corporation so they will extend and color the truth. Also if you get along well with the recruiter this is of no guarantee that you will get along well with rest of corp. Only way to find good corp is join in and give it a few weeks trial time, see how things go. If they don't go to well leave and go join another. It may be that your very 1st corp will be exactly what you are looking for. Most players however have to go through several before finding a good match. Point is to realize that you will make mistakes picking corporations but to keep on trying if you fail with your first choice. And you will occasionally fail with corp choices even 3+ years into EVE.

Toshiro GreyHawk
Posted - 2010.02.17 09:14:00 - [15]
 



Item #1 on your to do list:

1) Stop thinking about making an impact.

Concentrate on learning the game and playing it to the best of your ability. If you learn the game and play it well - then maybe you'll have an impact - and maybe you'll just be like thousands of others out there doing the best they can.

Either way, having an impact will happen or it won't. Thinking about it instead of learning to play the game won't help.




Chance has more to do with having a major impact on the game than intent. If you get into a corporation and become influential in it and the corporation becomes influential in an alliance - and you rise to the top - then one day you can get ****ed off at the people you are supposed to be taking care of - betray them - and destroy the alliance. That's been done though so you won't be the first if you do manage to pull it off.


Tarhim
Caldari
Posted - 2010.02.17 10:47:00 - [16]
 

Originally by: Mr Ravenblade

I was told in my newbie corp chat that if a corp is desperate for new members, they can not really be considered to be "good" corps. Is this not the case? No, This is not a flame as I really want to know how a corp is best judged.



"Goodness" of corp is defined by doing stuff together and enjoying it. You can make corp which has the goal to be hilariously bad pirates, for example, and you wan't have l33t kills then but you still can have immense amounts of fun.

Quote:

I honestly don't want to join the "wrong" corp or accidentally "choose the wrong side" by joining the wrong sort of corp with a bad rep.



Its your rep. Having some corps in your history that are suspicious to one that recruits you might be a hindrance, but is not something that will haunt you till the end of time. You'll just have to earn the trust or pick a different corp. Such is life.

Quote:

That is what I see in the marketing and all over the forums; Its always capitals or at least skill intensive t2 ships.



Rifter, Drake, Iteron mk V or Apocalypse are all t1 ships.

Quote:

I want to lead a eve-wide known alliance.



You realize that it will take years and there is no guarantee of success, right?

Yakumo Smith
Gallente
Body Count Inc.
Pandemic Legion
Posted - 2010.02.17 12:47:00 - [17]
 

You are making a difference already.

Your post and the replies will sway others into leaving or staying in the game. You didn't need any fancy ships or T2 skills to do that.

Yes some of the examples are a little on the extreme side, but i'll throw some at you too in the hope you'll understand. These ones involve having nothing more than some isk.

I buy the last T2 warp scrambler in a station. I then log off. 10 minutes later, a group of carebears in the same system are planning their first run to low-sec in cruisers, one of the guys can fit a T2 scram, but would have to fly 6 jumps to get it, so rather than making everyone wait, fits a t1 version available where he is instead.

The cruiser gang heads to low-sec and runs across a vagabond, due to some sloppy piloting, the vaga gets scrammed and his MWD shuts off. The pilot desperately trys to burn away and manages to get out of range of the scam, MWD comes back on at the pilot then decimates the remaining cruiser gang. The carebears run back to empire and continue to make isk always remembering how their best wasn't good enough Vs a solo pilot and that they couldn't compete.

The flip side of this, is if I didn't buy the T2 scram, the cruiser pilot fits it, during the same engagement with the vaga, the extra range on the t2 scram held the vaga for long enough to allow one of the other cruisers to get in range and put another scram and web on it. The vaga pilot took down some of the cruisers, but eventually died himself. The carebears realising that this pvp lark was actually fun and that the vaga pilot lost way more than they did decide to hang around the area and eventually turn into a pirate corp in the area.

Another time from personal experience. I used to fly with a guy called Mr X (to save his blushes), he was well known at the time for being skint and having next to no isk. While running a plex in 0.0, he got lucky and got a good drop and stuck it up on contract.

A rich carebear in empire bought the item on a Tuesday. This allowed Mr X to fly a Zealot in the next roam we went on. During the roam we encountered a similar sized gang, but we managed to hold the field and my ship managed to survive with 40% structure intact.

Flip side, the rich carebear bought the item on Wednesday. During the Tuesday roam, Mr X was in an inty as he couldn't afford a HAC, thanks to this, he managed to get a point on a ratting golum and we got a nice faction fitted kill mail. However on the way home, we ran into a gang of a similar size. Lacking the DPS of the Zealot, they held the field and everyone managed to get out except me. I missed the next nights roam as I needed to do some logistics to get more ships to the 0.0 outpost. What impact would that have had??

1 player can make a difference, you lack at the moment the skill to work out the impact you are having just by doing mundain things. This will come with player experience (not SP) and the quickest way to get this is to just get out there and do stuff.

Cyaxares II
Posted - 2010.02.17 13:27:00 - [18]
 

You might make a big difference even if this is not obvious to you.

Famous "every ship counts" GS ad: Linkage

Estel Arador
Posted - 2010.02.17 14:00:00 - [19]
 

Originally by: Mr Ravenblade
Originally by: Estel Arador
You assume that you must fly a big thing to have an impact. But you don't have to fly a Titan, you could also have an impact just by flying an interdictor


That is what I see in the marketing and all over the forums; Its always capitals or at least skill intensive t2 ships. Even you just mentioned a ship that is t2 in nature. I have yet to see anything about the guy in the noobship turning the tide of an epic battle and saving the day. Is that even possible?

You're being unreasonable. Why should just any noobship be able to turn the tide in an epic battle? Everyone would be flying noobships then! (Of course, a noobship could contribute, for instance by scouting ahead).

You object to my Interdictor vs Titan example. Just because an Interdictor is T2 in nature does not mean it's a wrong example. An Interdictor takes a couple of months of skilltraining and perhaps 40 million isk to buy and fit. A Titan takes well over a year to master and perhaps 100 billion (with a B) to buy and fit. Instead of a Titan one could get 385 months of gametime, that's equivalent to $6700 (USD). Does 2 months of training and 40 million isk ($2.70 equivalent) to tackle that $6700 ship still seem like a bad example to you?

Hallan De'estus
Posted - 2010.02.17 15:56:00 - [20]
 

Hello Ravenblade:

1) The differences we make will, most often, be invisible to us. As in R/L, we can't always see the future.

2) Like the Cylons Arrow You need a plan.

3) Near term you make noticeable differences in the right corp. I'm an example: 55 y.o. playing first online game ever, initially out of curiosity. Wanna talk about an utterly clueless noob? Look no further. Laughing

4) Joined a small corp with good collective knowledge of EVE, studied what they were doing, and tailored my efforts to support them.

5) My initail activities were far from glamourous, but I had a plan: my corp got a reliable, trustworthy student of the game. They got to operate more efficiently.

6) I now do much more, far more efficiently, and have widening responsibilities... and I'm having FUN.

7) Make a difference? Two nights ago a MUCH more senior, highly-skilled player returned to Eve and joined our corp. I provided an on-site tutorial of corp w/h ops: something not even in the game when this new player went on hiatus.

8) Our corp now has a motivated, highly-skilled member doing something new and fun for him. We benefit, he benefits.

9) Part of the fun is to see where it will all lead. Hope this is helpful.

Tau Cabalander
Posted - 2010.02.17 16:16:00 - [21]
 

So I trained up a bunch of skills, and pilot a Scorpion ECM battleship. I positively love the role of ECM ships but...

I suddenly got in the mood to get blown-up in a frigate!

I trained all the turret skills to level 2 (level 3 would be the basic certificate level) except gunnery which I trained to level 4 (prerequisite). I also cross-trained from Caldari to Amarr and Gallente and Minmatar so I can pilot them all (level 3). Took about 3-4 days to train I think.

I then proceeded to have an impact by throwing myself into the fray! Okay, the impact was more of a crater but still fun.

This aside from my goal to obtain every T1 BPO available, and dominate the markets with my manufacturing prowess, and bring smiles to the faces of distant miners as I haul away their under-priced harvest in my Charon freighter.

I also like to think I have an impact by answering questions on the forums Razz

SupaKudoRio
Posted - 2010.02.17 23:35:00 - [22]
 

I disrupted someone's mining operation once when I was new. I stole from their can and flipped it. One of them brought a frigate, a Punisher. My destroyer easily chewed that up. Then another showed up in an Apocalypse. I engaged him, and won.

This was with very, very little SP in combat skills, and using a purely T1 Coercer. I disrupted their mining operations for about an hour, and destroyed a couple of ships, doing a few millions in direct and indirect damage. A drop in the pond, sure, but it proves you don't need a T2 ship to beat people down. Razz I like to think I caused a 0.01 isk mineral price increase by doing that, but the truth is that not everything you do will ripple out as grandly as in the advertising.

Hakkar'al Gallente
Posted - 2010.02.18 15:40:00 - [23]
 

Originally by: The AEtherIt is easy however to pick corporation that is not a good match for you socially or that will end up just wasting your time. There are no ways to avoid this 100%. Make sure you interview the recruiters you talk to. When I did recruitment it is amazing how many people don't ask questions back at you. But recruiters are basically advertisement agents for the corporation so they will extend and color the truth. Also if you get along well with the recruiter this is of no guarantee that you will get along well with rest of corp. Only way to find good corp is join in and give it a few weeks trial time, see how things go. If they don't go to well leave and go join another. It may be that your very 1st corp will be exactly what you are looking for. Most players however have to go through several before finding a good match. Point is to realize that you will make mistakes picking corporations but to keep on trying if you fail with your first choice. And you will occasionally fail with corp choices even 3+ years into EVE.
[/quote



Very well put.
And if you want to make an impact in the game, in the way I think you want to - go look for corporations that claim they rent or hold space in 0.0.

Xrst
Posted - 2010.02.18 19:10:00 - [24]
 

Lets not forget, don't believe everything you read/see. Marketing is all about selling a product. Of course they aren't going to show you the "work" it took to get where they advertise, or how rare it may be (or may actually never happen).
I'm not saying the product is bad or all marketing is a lie. Just don't be so surprised when you see the reality is different than the commercial.

dtyk
Posted - 2010.02.18 19:33:00 - [25]
 

Originally by: Mr Ravenblade
Originally by: The AEther
Join a good corp and help build it.


The main issue with that goal is the distinct lack of trust in eve, and the fact that new players are often seen as simply spies or worse. I guess many people would consider this a feature of eve rather than a problem, but looking at game mechanics it would seem that trust and co-operation are rewarded far more than the alternative.




Quote:

That is what I see in the marketing and all over the forums; Its always capitals or at least skill intensive t2 ships. Even you just mentioned a ship that is t2 in nature. I have yet to see anything about the guy in the noobship turning the tide of an epic battle and saving the day. Is that even possible?



That's because big explosions impress many people:P But really, there's a few things: By the time you've learned the game mechanics well enough to actually benefit from using a t2 ship, you will be able to fly at least some. The skills needed to fly an interceptor (the best ship in game for fast tackling, which IS ALWAYS NEEDED BY ANY FLEET), takes under 2 months to train. In that time, you can achieve very nearly the same effect with a days or so worth of training.

You need an interdictor or a heavy interdictor to tackle a titan or a supercarrier, but there's a lot of other ways a small ship can make a difference in a large fleet fight. For example, the rifter (cost: 0.5 to 5 mil) can kill the hostile interdictor (aproximately 40-50 million) that's stopping the friendly titan (around 100 bil, give or take a dozen billion). Titan losses are something that make seperate threads in the forums happen. Saving one is a big deal. And a rifter can kill the enemy rifter trying to kill your mates interdictor. Or take down the cov ops trying to probe down the place where the titan's hiding at, because the titan's too clumsy to keep warping all the time. Or the rifter can tackle a freighter. Or solo kill an industrial with billions (literally. Some people take unnecessary risks).

Or a punisher fitted with a ECM Burst can screw up the remote repair system of a hostile battleship fleet, allowing your friends with more firepower to take them down while they attempt to lock eachother again.

Or a t1 ECM ship can jam an enemy falcon, saving your logistic ships from being jammed, and thus saving the fleet from being left without reps. Or the same ship can jam the enemy logistics, stopping them from repping their friends so your friends can kill them.

None of these make a huge impact on the game as whole, but they can change the outcome of a fight.

A new player doesn't do that much DPS against a well-tanked ship meant for combat (industrials and miners, though,are a different thing), but there's a lot of support roles that are very doable in a t1 ship and are either necessary, like tackling, or very useful, like EWAR.

And there's a lot of t2 ships that don't take a year to train for. The cov ops ships and interceptors are not advertised that much, but they're both designed for roles vital to a pvp fleet, and both of them take more time to learn to use than to get the SP necessary. Of course it will take time, and you should anyway start in t1 ships because of the price, but they don't take ages.



Quote:
I want to lead a eve-wide known alliance.

You know, there's only a handful of people that have ever, since EVE was released, succeeded in doing this, no matter how much isk they have and how long they have played? But if that's what you really want, join a corp that has similar interests gameplay wise as you do, be active, contribute to the corp, and you'll rise to leadership level. This will take years of time or incredible luck. Ask some random person you encounter how many alliance leaders they can name at the moment. Very few will be able to name more than 3 or 4. Out of a tens of thousands players, a handful are known as alliance leaders.

My Postman
Posted - 2010.02.19 10:41:00 - [26]
 

Originally by: Tau Cabalander
So I trained up a bunch of skills, and pilot a Scorpion ECM battleship. I positively love the role of ECM ships but...

I suddenly got in the mood to get blown-up in a frigate!

I trained all the turret skills to level 2 (level 3 would be the basic certificate level) except gunnery which I trained to level 4 (prerequisite). I also cross-trained from Caldari to Amarr and Gallente and Minmatar so I can pilot them all (level 3). Took about 3-4 days to train I think.

I then proceeded to have an impact by throwing myself into the fray! Okay, the impact was more of a crater but still fun.

This aside from my goal to obtain every T1 BPO available, and dominate the markets with my manufacturing prowess, and bring smiles to the faces of distant miners as I haul away their under-priced harvest in my Charon freighter.

I also like to think I have an impact by answering questions on the forums Razz



Confirming Tau´s Hulk fitting tips saved my hulk more than once from suiciding! Kudos for that!

Greygal
Gallente
Sephray Industries
Serenitas Solutus
Posted - 2010.02.19 11:43:00 - [27]
 

Edited by: Greygal on 19/02/2010 11:44:00
There's a ton of great advice already above - all I can add is emphasizing the importance of making friends and suggestions on how to meet people. Some ways for new players to do this are:

- Join RvB (Red vs Blue). In RvB, you learn to pvp with cheapfit t1 ships, the joys of continuous warfare, have a ton of fun plus get to know a lot of people. Red vs Blue

- Join Eve University. In Eve University you will learn just about anything you can imagine, make friends and gain some knowledge about the politics that you seem to be interested in. Both of these look good on your employment history (at least to many) and, from the friendships and connections you make, you will be able to better judge what it is you are looking for in the people you play with and the corp(s) you join. Eve University / Ivy League

- You may also want to consider taking Agony Unleashed's PvP Beginner's Course and see just how devastating a bunch of newbs in frigates can be *grins* Classes are offered over a weekend, usually about every 2 weeks, and fill up very fast. Agony Unleashed

Also watch the Events & Gatherings forum for fun ingame events (such as Ships of Eve's Damnation Tournament last month!), continue reading and posting in the forums, join various ingame chat rooms, and never be afraid to talk to strangers :)

Welcome to Eve :)

Greygal

Sanctus Maleficus
Lambent Enterprises
Enforcers of Serenity
Posted - 2010.02.19 20:58:00 - [28]
 

Mr Ravenblde, do keep in mind that there are many corps out there who are very interested in recruiting newer pilots, as long as they're mature people. Shameless self-promotion -- such as my corp, Lambent Enterprises. Many of our members we recruited in their first month of playing, and they're still with us!

One guy, because of his dedication to helping us find wormholes, helped increase the profits of quite a few people, simply by spending more time hunting for good systems, for us, for example. This in turn lead to a surplus of corp funds, and has helped us grow as a whole!

Tau Cabalander
Posted - 2010.02.19 21:45:00 - [29]
 

Originally by: My Postman
Originally by: Tau Cabalander
I also like to think I have an impact by answering questions on the forums Razz

Confirming Tau´s Hulk fitting tips saved my hulk more than once from suiciding! Kudos for that!

Very HappyVery HappyVery HappyVery HappyVery HappyVery HappyVery HappyVery HappyVery HappyVery HappyVery HappyVery HappyVery HappyVery HappyVery Happy

Thanks!

Iria Ahrens
Amarr
Ministry of War
Posted - 2010.02.19 23:24:00 - [30]
 

Edited by: Iria Ahrens on 19/02/2010 23:31:05

Originally by: Mr Ravenblade

I was told in my newbie corp chat that if a corp is desperate for new members, they can not really be considered to be "good" corps. Is this not the case?


No, it's not the case, that newbie was an idiot. If a corp is desperate for new members, then it could be several different reasons. Including lack of good advertising, or a remote location. Or just competition. There are a LOT of corps out there. Or the corp most active playing time could be in the dead of night when most players are asleep or working.

Quote:
That is what I see in the marketing and all over the forums; Its always capitals or at least skill intensive t2 ships. Even you just mentioned a ship that is t2 in nature. I have yet to see anything about the guy in the noobship turning the tide of an epic battle and saving the day. Is that even possible?


Click on the link in my sig. It's a recent effort by two experienced players. They both went out and created some serious havoc with 2 day old characters. The important thing to remember is that the PLAYERS had loads of pvp experience, but if it were all about the t2 then even with experience they would be ineffective in t1 frigates with only 2 days to train, but this was far from the case.

The biggest stumbling block towards effectiveness in eve is experience. As long as you're not a bigger rock player then you can play now and have an impact very quickly. Unfortunately, if you are a bigger rock type player, then you'll spend years being annoyed at other people with rocks bigger than yours.

There are several approaches to playing eve:
1. Use the Bigger rock
2. Use paper against the rock
3. Use lots of small rocks against big rocks.
4. Sell rocks, sell paper.
5. Tell other people to throw rocks
6. Spy on other people's rocks
7. Steal other people's rocks.
8. Throw a rock and blame another.
9. Write articles about people throwing rocks.
10. Make movies and tutorials on how to throw rocks better.
11. Write forum articles complaining about the size of other people's rocks.
12. Diplomatically end rock throwing partyies.
13. Train newbies to throw rocks in your corp.
14. Collect rocks.
15. Haul rocks.
16. Dig up rocks.
17. Explore new rocks.

etc. etc. I really could go on, but these are the easy off-the-top-of-my-head examples.


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