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Red Flagsman
Posted - 2009.12.29 12:25:00 - [1]
 

I love wolfram alpha.

Given that my frigate can decelerate from full warp velocity (6 AU/s) in about 15 seconds, my ship is experiencing 6.078e9 g's of acceleration. 6,078,000,000 times the force of Earth's gravity. Astronauts on the way to orbit get about what, 3 g's? or one-three millionth the acceleration a minutes old EVE player can get?

LittleTerror
Day Unhappy Security Inc.
Posted - 2009.12.29 12:28:00 - [2]
 

Ship is not moving the warp bubble is and all that crap...

Red Flagsman
Posted - 2009.12.29 12:40:00 - [3]
 

Alright yes, the Alcumbiere drive and what have you.

Regardless, when my firetail hits 1500 m/s in 6 seconds flat, that's 26 g's. So thank goodness for eggs full of snot.

Lork Niffle
Gallente
External Hard Drive
Posted - 2009.12.29 12:42:00 - [4]
 

Anything to do with warp does not experience G force since it is warping (would you believe it) the space in front of you effectively covering it without moving, it could be considered effectively teleporting you forward.

Joe Skellington
Minmatar
Matari Legion Holding
Matari Legion
Posted - 2009.12.29 13:45:00 - [5]
 

Edited by: Joe Skellington on 29/12/2009 13:51:33
G-Force:
The unit of measure used is the g- the acceleration due to gravity.
1. The g-force acting on a stationary object resting on the Earth's surface is 1 g (upwards) and results from the resisting reaction of the Earth's surface bearing upwards equal to an acceleration of 1 g, and is equal and opposite to standard gravity, defined as 9.80665 metres per second squared, or equivalently 9.80665 newtons of force per kilogram of mass.
2. The g-force acting on an object in any weightless environment such as free-fall in a vacuum is 0 g.


There is no gravity in space, so I think your argument is invalid.

Ci Seepy
Amarr
Posted - 2009.12.29 13:52:00 - [6]
 

Originally by: Joe Skellington
There is no gravity in space, so I think your argument is invalid.


I think you need to learn what gravity is, please see here. Laughing

Joe Skellington
Minmatar
Matari Legion Holding
Matari Legion
Posted - 2009.12.29 13:53:00 - [7]
 

Edited by: Joe Skellington on 29/12/2009 13:54:14
Originally by: Ci Seepy
Originally by: Joe Skellington
There is no gravity in space, so I think your argument is invalid.


I think you need to learn what gravity is, please see here. Laughing


He's talking about g-force and effects on a ship, not a gravity well and planets.

G-Force

Red Flagsman
Posted - 2009.12.29 13:56:00 - [8]
 

Originally by: Joe Skellington
Edited by: Joe Skellington on 29/12/2009 13:51:33
G-Force:
The unit of measure used is the g- the acceleration due to gravity.
1. The g-force acting on a stationary object resting on the Earth's surface is 1 g (upwards) and results from the resisting reaction of the Earth's surface bearing upwards equal to an acceleration of 1 g, and is equal and opposite to standard gravity, defined as 9.80665 metres per second squared, or equivalently 9.80665 newtons of force per kilogram of mass.
2. The g-force acting on an object in any weightless environment such as free-fall in a vacuum is 0 g.


There is no gravity in space, so I think your argument is invalid.


Young one, you bring tears to my eyes.

Gravity is an acceleration. Hence, "Acceleration due to gravity". Pressing the accelerator on your car is an acceleration. It can be measured (as gravity) in units of M/s*s (Meters per seconds squared).

A rate of acceleration can be compared to 1g, the rate at which you would accelerate in freefall on earth.

I really hope you were trolling.

Hera Ominae
Posted - 2009.12.29 14:03:00 - [9]
 

Originally by: Red Flagsman
I love wolfram alpha.

Given that my frigate can decelerate from full warp velocity (6 AU/s) in about 15 seconds, my ship is experiencing 6.078e9 g's of acceleration. 6,078,000,000 times the force of Earth's gravity. Astronauts on the way to orbit get about what, 3 g's? or one-three millionth the acceleration a minutes old EVE player can get?
Well, this is SCI-FI game... Does it ring a bell?

RaTTuS
BIG
Gentlemen's Agreement
Posted - 2009.12.29 14:06:00 - [10]
 

max you can do in normal life is 10G
and you need a g-suit for that
and will probably suffer blackeyes etc
eve is not real ;-P

Par'Gellen
Gallente
Neon Cranium
Posted - 2009.12.29 14:18:00 - [11]
 

Originally by: RaTTuS
eve is not real
LIES!

Richest Mofo
Posted - 2009.12.29 14:32:00 - [12]
 

your clone is suspended in liquid, which is incompressible. Not sure what that means, but it sounds good.

Thirzarr
Posted - 2009.12.29 14:41:00 - [13]
 

Originally by: Red Flagsman
So thank goodness for eggs full of snot.


It's not snot! It's goo! MISSION GOO!

WarlockX
Amarr
Free Trade Corp
Posted - 2009.12.29 14:52:00 - [14]
 

Originally by: Red Flagsman
Alright yes, the Alcumbiere drive and what have you.

Regardless, when my firetail hits 1500 m/s in 6 seconds flat, that's 26 g's. So thank goodness for eggs full of snot.


26g for a sci fi ship is barely moving Wink

RaTTuS
BIG
Gentlemen's Agreement
Posted - 2009.12.29 14:54:00 - [15]
 

Originally by: Par'Gellen
Originally by: RaTTuS
eve is not real
LIES!

Damn you got me thereWink
ugh

Letri Bimmet
Gallente
Estrale Frontiers
Posted - 2009.12.29 15:06:00 - [16]
 

Your pod is filled with snot and protects you (ewww)

but what about the rest of the crew?...I don't think it would be very usefull if your crew were exploded/compressed/crushed/and other body extremes every time you move your boat about.

And it'll be quite a cleaning bill every time you hit station.

Khemul Zula
Amarr
Keisen Trade League
Posted - 2009.12.29 15:15:00 - [17]
 

Originally by: Letri Bimmet
but what about the rest of the crew?...I don't think it would be very usefull if your crew were exploded/compressed/crushed/and other body extremes every time you move your boat about.

And it'll be quite a cleaning bill every time you hit station.
Crews are easily replacable.

First task of the new crew, clean up the old crew. No cleaning bill. Twisted Evil

Mia Restolo
Posted - 2009.12.29 16:35:00 - [18]
 

Originally by: RaTTuS
max you can do in normal life is 10G
and you need a g-suit for that
and will probably suffer blackeyes etc
eve is not real ;-P


For functioning under heavy Gs like a fighter pilot 10-12 is probably the max but shouldn't cause any injury unless they black out and crash.

The highest survived G-force that can be reliably calculated was 179.8 when David Purley slammed into a wall qualifying for the British Grand Prix.

The highest voluntary G-force test subject was John Paul Stapp who strapped himself into a rocket sled for the experiments dozens of times. The highest run being to 46.2 G. It did result in massive bruising and two detached retinas.Shocked

Agent Known
Posted - 2009.12.29 16:57:00 - [19]
 

Originally by: Mia Restolo
Originally by: RaTTuS
max you can do in normal life is 10G
and you need a g-suit for that
and will probably suffer blackeyes etc
eve is not real ;-P


For functioning under heavy Gs like a fighter pilot 10-12 is probably the max but shouldn't cause any injury unless they black out and crash.

The highest survived G-force that can be reliably calculated was 179.8 when David Purley slammed into a wall qualifying for the British Grand Prix.

The highest voluntary G-force test subject was John Paul Stapp who strapped himself into a rocket sled for the experiments dozens of times. The highest run being to 46.2 G. It did result in massive bruising and two detached retinas.Shocked


Let's just hope it wasn't three retinas...

Drakarin
Gallente
Absentia Libertas Solus
Posted - 2009.12.30 05:26:00 - [20]
 

Originally by: Red Flagsman
Originally by: Joe Skellington
Edited by: Joe Skellington on 29/12/2009 13:51:33
G-Force:
The unit of measure used is the g- the acceleration due to gravity.
1. The g-force acting on a stationary object resting on the Earth's surface is 1 g (upwards) and results from the resisting reaction of the Earth's surface bearing upwards equal to an acceleration of 1 g, and is equal and opposite to standard gravity, defined as 9.80665 metres per second squared, or equivalently 9.80665 newtons of force per kilogram of mass.
2. The g-force acting on an object in any weightless environment such as free-fall in a vacuum is 0 g.


There is no gravity in space, so I think your argument is invalid.


Young one, you bring tears to my eyes.

Gravity is an acceleration. Hence, "Acceleration due to gravity". Pressing the accelerator on your car is an acceleration. It can be measured (as gravity) in units of M/s*s (Meters per seconds squared).

A rate of acceleration can be compared to 1g, the rate at which you would accelerate in freefall on earth.

I really hope you were trolling.


Acceleration, and gravity, are two separate energies.

Gravity is the effect of an object curving space-time, given Einstein's theory correct.

There is little to no gravity in the void between planets in a solar system.

randomname4me
Posted - 2009.12.30 05:53:00 - [21]
 

crap I would be 1,124,430,000,000 over weight... for 15 seconds.

Damion Stranek
Posted - 2009.12.30 06:30:00 - [22]
 

Edited by: Damion Stranek on 30/12/2009 06:32:45
Originally by: Drakarin
Originally by: Red Flagsman
Originally by: Joe Skellington
Edited by: Joe Skellington on 29/12/2009 13:51:33
G-Force:
The unit of measure used is the g- the acceleration due to gravity.
1. The g-force acting on a stationary object resting on the Earth's surface is 1 g (upwards) and results from the resisting reaction of the Earth's surface bearing upwards equal to an acceleration of 1 g, and is equal and opposite to standard gravity, defined as 9.80665 metres per second squared, or equivalently 9.80665 newtons of force per kilogram of mass.
2. The g-force acting on an object in any weightless environment such as free-fall in a vacuum is 0 g.


There is no gravity in space, so I think your argument is invalid.


Young one, you bring tears to my eyes.

Gravity is an acceleration. Hence, "Acceleration due to gravity". Pressing the accelerator on your car is an acceleration. It can be measured (as gravity) in units of M/s*s (Meters per seconds squared).

A rate of acceleration can be compared to 1g, the rate at which you would accelerate in freefall on earth.

I really hope you were trolling.


Acceleration, and gravity, are two separate energies.

Gravity is the effect of an object curving space-time, given Einstein's theory correct.

There is little to no gravity in the void between planets in a solar system.


Acceleration and gravity are not "energies". Gravity is one of four fundamental forces (according to our current model). Applied forces cause accelerations, it doesn't matter where the force comes from, the acceleration produced will be identical. So when we talk about acceleration due to gravity, we are referring to the quantity "9.8 meters per second per second". Gravity still exists in space but the magnitude of the force is greatly reduced, for reasons you could learn in a freshman level physics course. In fact, you can calculate your ships acceleration produced by an afterburner in the game by viewing the afterburner's attributes. The forces produced are 1,500,000N, 15,000,000, and 150,000,000 by the 1MN, 10MN and 100MN afterburners. This is somewhat odd as the MN is the unit "meganewton" which ought to be 1,000,000 N, 10,000,000 N, and 100,000,000 N respectively.

All of this said, it is almost assured that the ships have some sort of inertial dampeners to reduce the acceleration experienced by the crew during sub-warp flight.

Drakarin
Gallente
Absentia Libertas Solus
Posted - 2009.12.30 06:40:00 - [23]
 

Originally by: Damion Stranek
Edited by: Damion Stranek on 30/12/2009 06:32:20
Edited by: Damion Stranek on 30/12/2009 06:31:09
Originally by: Drakarin
Originally by: Red Flagsman
Originally by: Joe Skellington
Edited by: Joe Skellington on 29/12/2009 13:51:33
G-Force:
The unit of measure used is the g- the acceleration due to gravity.
1. The g-force acting on a stationary object resting on the Earth's surface is 1 g (upwards) and results from the resisting reaction of the Earth's surface bearing upwards equal to an acceleration of 1 g, and is equal and opposite to standard gravity, defined as 9.80665 metres per second squared, or equivalently 9.80665 newtons of force per kilogram of mass.
2. The g-force acting on an object in any weightless environment such as free-fall in a vacuum is 0 g.


There is no gravity in space, so I think your argument is invalid.


Young one, you bring tears to my eyes.

Gravity is an acceleration. Hence, "Acceleration due to gravity". Pressing the accelerator on your car is an acceleration. It can be measured (as gravity) in units of M/s*s (Meters per seconds squared).

A rate of acceleration can be compared to 1g, the rate at which you would accelerate in freefall on earth.

I really hope you were trolling.


Acceleration, and gravity, are two separate energies.

Gravity is the effect of an object curving space-time, given Einstein's theory correct.

There is little to no gravity in the void between planets in a solar system.


Acceleration and gravity are not "energies". Gravity is one of four fundamental forces (according to our current model). Applied forces cause accelerations, it doesn't matter where the force comes from, the acceleration produced will be identical. So when we talk about acceleration due to gravity, we are referring to the quantity "9.8 meters per second per second". Gravity still exists in space but the magnitude of the force is greatly reduced, for reasons you could learn in a freshman level physics course. In fact, you can calculate your ships acceleration produced by an afterburner in the game by viewing the afterburner's attributes. The forces produced are 1,500,000N, 15,000,000, and 150,000,000 by the 1MN, 10MN and 100MN afterburners. This is somewhat odd as the MN is the unit "meganewton" which ought to be 1,000,000 N, 10,000,000 N, and 100,000,000 N respectively.

All of this said, it is almost assured that the ships have some sort of inertial dampeners to reduce the acceleration experienced by the crew during sub-warp flight.



Fundamental force, yes. Energy is the product of effect. Nothing could happen without it. Gravity most certainly qualifies at least as negative energy.

But you're right, acceleration does apply force, even in an empty vacuum, which feels to a human being identical to gravity. So yeah, if EvE ships are equipped with a crew, inertial dampeners would be mandatory, or every ship would have human pancakes splattered against the walls.


Spaceman Jack
Posted - 2009.12.30 18:38:00 - [24]
 

Originally by: LittleTerror
Ship is not moving the warp bubble is and all that crap...


WIN

Benedict Carol
Posted - 2009.12.30 18:42:00 - [25]
 

So.... the inertial dampeners are working great.

If you were looking for a MMO with space tech that makes sense, you're in the wrong spot. Warp drive shouldn't make your "rocket engines" go brighter (unless they're heat exhausts and don't propel anything), nor should there be sound in space (jump gates making sound ftl).




Hythloday
Posted - 2009.12.30 18:51:00 - [26]
 

Edited by: Hythloday on 30/12/2009 18:53:19
Eve-O forums: Where people can have a discussion about physics, while completely disregarding the fact that spaceships in Eve traverse through a luminous space aether rather than a vacuum.

Eve's luminous space aether causes resistance, and so velocity and time become absolute rather than relative, contrary to Newton and Einstein's laws and theories about our universe. So unlike in our universe, constant thrust is required to maintain velocity.

I would say that seeing as how Eve is set in a universe that isn't bound by Newtonian physics (and relativity), theres no point in thinking about how many newtons of force you would experience as your ship accelerates.

LittleTerror
Day Unhappy Security Inc.
Posted - 2009.12.30 19:25:00 - [27]
 

Edited by: LittleTerror on 30/12/2009 19:25:27
If everything in physics is correct, if you can control gravity and create your own area of gravitational effect like planets and other bodies do. Except using very little mass to do it, you could create your own area of time and space or bent space and then move that around on the fabric of the universe and experience no Gforce.

You would not be accelerating the space around would be and that does not have mass? So we also get over the problem of mass ever increasing as it reaches light speed needing unlimited energy.

Also to the op stating how does he not experience G's when his ship accelerates to 1500 m/s in 6 seconds, that is simple its called a micro WARPdrive.

LittleTerror
Day Unhappy Security Inc.
Posted - 2009.12.30 19:33:00 - [28]
 

I'd also like to point out that the warp bubbles used to pull you out of warp are quite spot on, they warp the space around them causing your warp bubble to collapse and fail.

KingMenelaus
Posted - 2009.12.30 19:46:00 - [29]
 

Originally by: LittleTerror
Edited by: LittleTerror on 30/12/2009 19:25:27
If everything in physics is correct, if you can control gravity and create your own area of gravitational effect like planets and other bodies do. Except using very little mass to do it, you could create your own area of time and space or bent space and then move that around on the fabric of the universe and experience no Gforce.

You would not be accelerating the space around would be and that does not have mass? So we also get over the problem of mass ever increasing as it reaches light speed needing unlimited energy.

Also to the op stating how does he not experience G's when his ship accelerates to 1500 m/s in 6 seconds, that is simple its called a micro WARPdrive.


If this is correct may i ask you a question?


would you like some toast :)

Drakarin
Gallente
Absentia Libertas Solus
Posted - 2009.12.30 21:26:00 - [30]
 

Originally by: Hythloday
Edited by: Hythloday on 30/12/2009 18:53:19
Eve-O forums: Where people can have a discussion about physics, while completely disregarding the fact that spaceships in Eve traverse through a luminous space aether rather than a vacuum.

Eve's luminous space aether causes resistance, and so velocity and time become absolute rather than relative, contrary to Newton and Einstein's laws and theories about our universe. So unlike in our universe, constant thrust is required to maintain velocity.

I would say that seeing as how Eve is set in a universe that isn't bound by Newtonian physics (and relativity), theres no point in thinking about how many newtons of force you would experience as your ship accelerates.


Then how do planets orbit a star? They'd need constant thrust to do so. The idea fails right there...


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