open All Channels
seplocked EVE New Citizens Q&A
blankseplocked Older toons vs. Newer toons...
 
This thread is older than 90 days and has been locked due to inactivity.


 
Pages: [1] 2

Author Topic

Muzzer Fracker
Posted - 2009.12.12 19:13:00 - [1]
 

Edited by: Muzzer Fracker on 12/12/2009 19:43:43
I have a very simple question.

How does Eve compensate(if at all) for the fact that the balance of power in just about any game situation, is constantly being swayed in the favor of older toons over newer ones. The longer the game goes at this rate, the less chance any new toons to the game ever have of experiencing the game in the same way and to as full an extent as older toons.

I personally dont mind the euphemism of this fact that is that I can become a specialist in a given field and maybe become as good at one particular niche as an older toon, but simply lack the depth and breadth of skills, whether or not they have synergy with my chosen field. I do, however, have friends who simply cant understand why anyone would want to start a game that a new player can literally never catch up to an older player in...

The argument that a single toon one or two years younger than another toon could still outplay and outsmart the older toon to ensure a form of victory does not account for the fact that the older toon still has an inherent advantage, and that given equal skill and equal opportunity, the older toon is much more likely to succeed in a confrontational situation.

In many games, there simply isnt as huge a time commitment necessary for an extremely skilled but new player to become competetive with other extremely skilled players. But in Eve, it seems that the amount of time one has spent playing the game will always be as large a factor as skill in determining the outcome of an encounter, and possibly even a larger factor in some(dare I say, many) situations.

Please let me make this clear, this is NOT a troll post, I personally still get much enjoyment out of the game despite being lightyears behind the 2004-2005 toons, but that barrier is a major turn-off for many of my friends, and in my attempts to bring more of my friends into a game that I enjoy, I am failing to successfully counter their argument for this one...

edit: I am intentionally posting this from an alt so as not to bring unwatned attention to my young main...

Himnos Altar
Gallente
Daisy Cutter's
Posted - 2009.12.12 19:44:00 - [2]
 

I'm going to make a different point than other might.

yes, specialization, etc

yes, player skill in a given area, etc

in a 1v1 fight....

but honestly the thing that gives you the edge is the people you hang with in-game.

your corpies, your allies, and your non-corpie friends. if you go 5 months not learning anything because you refuse to group up, and here's a one month old character who is in an excellent corp who gives him good advice, my bets would be on the month old.

honestly, I don't see it as a problem though.

CRIMSON KNIGHTINGALE
Posted - 2009.12.12 20:06:00 - [3]
 

Edited by: CRIMSON KNIGHTINGALE on 12/12/2009 20:06:52
nvm

damn you op and your wall of text edit

Seurimas
Posted - 2009.12.12 20:10:00 - [4]
 

I believe the simple answers I've been given summarize to:

You can legally buy characters much bigger if you work at it for a month or two.
You can only fit so much equipment on a single ship, therefor you can work towards piloting a very specific rig well in the space of a month or two and do it as well as any "old toon".
Specialization.
Live with it.

Personally, I dislike the last two. Twisted Evil

Kahega Amielden
Minmatar Ship Construction Services
Ushra'Khan
Posted - 2009.12.12 21:15:00 - [5]
 

Edited by: Kahega Amielden on 12/12/2009 21:14:55


For one, each level of a given skill is 5x harder to train than the last. For example, any player more than a couple months old can have all gunnery support skills to IV. Characters even <1 month old can easily have all gunnery support skills to III.

Only very old characters will usually have them to V. However, a couple month-old character with the skills to IV will have nearly the same performance from these guns than the character who is years old.

Secondly, specialization. There's only so many skills that go into flying a given ship, and there's diminishing returns with time invested.


And lastly...fights in EVE aren't generally 1v1 fights with the same ships and the same skills. Of all the things that influence any given fight, SP is probably the least important.


Let me give you an example of these above concepts in action. Myself and a couple friends were flying around lowsec in frigate. One was in a Vengeance (t2 assault frig), one was in a Rifter, and one was in a Merlin (me). The rifter pilot was about 3 months, the Vengeance pilot was over a year old, and I was about 1.5 years old at this point.

We came in and tackled a Vexor in a belt. He was about 4-5 months old. SP wise, all but the rifter pilot vastly outclassed him. He was a droneboat fit with a web and a scram, which meant that he was death to small ships. He had a pretty nice active tank, and we were relatively light on DPS

What happened: I forget how the Rifter pilot died...but it could have been any number of ways since he was being webbed and scrammed and blasted with drones and blasters. The Vengeance pilot orbited too close and thus wasn't able to get most of his AB speed (pilot error) and thus got absolutely annihilated by the full DPS from a blaster + drone cruiser.

I was orbiting at around 15km in my Merlin shooting with my rails and missiles. He sent his drones after me, but I used my MWD to kite his drones and start popping them. He only lost one drone, though, since he recalled damaged drones to refill their shield in his drone bay before sending them out again. Eventually I made the stupid mistake of burning past him (not realizing he had a scram). My MWD shuts off and I die horribly seconds later.

Two 1+ year old players and one three-month old player died horribly to a 4-6 month old player due to

a) Us deciding to engage something we shouldn't have (wrong fits/ships considering what we were up against), and
b) Pilot error on our part, and
c) smart piloting on his part.


TLDR: SP isn't everything, or even a lot.


of course the above example is PVP, but the concepts can be applied to pretty much everything else in the game.


Shawna Gray
Gallente
Posted - 2009.12.12 23:18:00 - [6]
 

Originally by: Muzzer Fracker

In many games, there simply isnt as huge a time commitment necessary for an extremely skilled but new player to become competetive with other extremely skilled players. But in Eve, it seems that the amount of time one has spent playing the game will always be as large a factor as skill in determining the outcome of an encounter, and possibly even a larger factor in some(dare I say, many) situations.



EVE is probably one of the easiest games for a casual new player to become competitive with older chars.

You dont need to grind to level 80 or whatever. You train skills offline.
You dont need to spend months grinding to get "epics".
A few new chars can easily kill older chars, there no huge gap like that you have between a lvl 1 and a lvl 80 char in for instance wow.

The primary benefit of having a older char is the ability to fly more ships well.
As a new char you should specialise in one ship and then expand from there.

The biggest gap between older players and new ones is in gameknowledge, not in skillpoints.

Xiao rui
Posted - 2009.12.12 23:26:00 - [7]
 

Edited by: Xiao rui on 12/12/2009 23:27:27
.

Ladani
Posted - 2009.12.12 23:29:00 - [8]
 

Edited by: Ladani on 12/12/2009 23:29:57
Originally by: Muzzer Fracker
The argument that a single toon one or two years younger than another toon could still outplay and outsmart the older toon to ensure a form of victory does not account for the fact that the older toon still has an inherent advantage, and that given equal skill and equal opportunity, the older toon is much more likely to succeed in a confrontational situation.

When I was about 6 months into the game I made my first 1 billion ISK. When I was one year into the game I had enough ISK to purchase a toon with 60-70 million skill points. I used the initial few months in game to learn the basic game mechanics, expanded on that knowledge nearing a year, and simply made ISK faster than my toon could accumulate sp. Then I went to Character Bazaar and purchased all the characters I have ever wanted to play with that have been in training for years prior to when I started the game. This is completely safe to do and sanctioned by CCP. And if I could do it, I don't see why you can't do the same. If you can't think of the ways to make this kind of ISK, then you can purchase game time codes for real life cash, sell them for ISK, and then use the ISK to buy yourself more powerful toons.

Muzzer Fracker
Posted - 2009.12.12 23:32:00 - [9]
 

Thanks guys, from what I have seen, I totally agree with all these statements. I will show this thread to said friends I have been trying to recruit to the Eve cause, and let u all know how it goes. Thanks again for ur help :)

Junko Togawa
Caldari
Posted - 2009.12.12 23:47:00 - [10]
 

To butcher an old axiom, 'Youth and treachery will always overcome age and skill.' Or to put it another way...see that 60M SP char some rich WOWtard newb bought and fitted in a pwnmobile Marauder with officer mods cos he heard they were epic? Ooh! Pretteh boom-boom! He just got assraeped by a gang of 5 1M SP chars run by old vets in T1 hulls and cheapfit ships working as a team to shut down his pretty ship's targeting and web/scram while some gankmobiles neuted his tank and shredded his S/A/H. All cos he thought someone would honor one-vs-one duels sitting off a station...tsk-tsk-tsk...oh well, time to fap to teh killmail! *fapfapfapfap*

Twisted Evil


Merouk Baas
Gallente
Posted - 2009.12.13 00:46:00 - [11]
 

I'm an old player; I've been playing various characters since the game was released, and, well, it's a game. It has bugs, it has poor customer support, the devs sometimes make poor decisions, so as a result people come and go, stop playing, come back for a few months, stop playing again... You're new, and very interested in the game, but the truth is that this game isn't really that much better than any other game.

Think about this: do you see yourself playing this game continuously for the next 5 years? That's what you're comparing with, someone who's played for 5 years.

People come and go; I would guess that the majority of the playerbase is probably in the 5 million - 30 million skill points, i.e. 4 months old to 1 year old. And that's very much a goal you can reach, in that amount of time, and it's easier to gather ISK now.

Not everybody is 5 years old, just like not everybody is at max level in top tier or artifact raiding gear in other games.

Nikki Nightingale
Caldari
Posted - 2009.12.13 01:54:00 - [12]
 

I'm pretty new to all of this, but when I was just starting out I had a tremendous feeling of awe for the game. I read the forums, jumped around in space, thinking to myself "Wow, I know nothing! I dont know what to do. Dont know how to do it. Dont know what I can do."

And I loved it. It felt real. As if I was a youngster in the early 1800's who got a little ship and set out to explore the world, with what little resources I had. I'm at peace with the fact that there will always be a (very much) bigger fish. Really, it seems analogous to the real world. What an adventure.

Best regards,
NN

Navtiqes
GoonWaffe
SOLODRAKBANSOLODRAKBANSO
Posted - 2009.12.13 02:51:00 - [13]
 

tldr but EVE compensates with diminishing returns. Old means more versatile, more ways to kill you, but not necessarily much more than 10% better than you at any given specialization.

You'll never catch up, but you don't have to to compete anyway.

Elukka
Posted - 2009.12.13 10:06:00 - [14]
 

Edited by: Elukka on 13/12/2009 10:06:04
You can be a viable PVP'r in a frigate after a few days of playing. In other MMOs, while you might eventually catch up to the max level, there's absolutely no way you can do anything with a lvl 10 character against a lvl 80 character. Not even if there's a bunch of you, and you have a good leader. You can't do anything until you're up to a high level.

Dian'h Might
Minmatar
Cash and Cargo Liberators Incorporated
Posted - 2009.12.13 10:10:00 - [15]
 

For pvp, the only thing SP does for you (with the exceptions of a few skills) is allow you to fly and/or fit more variety of ships and modules (Another way of saying specialization I guess). PvP in eve isn't so much about evenly matched 1v1's, who has the most SP, or who can bring more ships or have better in-fight tactics. Winning is more about knowing where your ship+fitting excels, how to use it in those situations where it excels, and then putting it a situation in which it can excel.

Example:
Either of the two drone cruisers, regardless of SP (assuming you can at least sit in it and use all the modules/drones), will generally ruin a frig pilots day (sometimes several at once). Regardless of the SP of the person flying the frigate. A lower SP player jumping a vexor into a small gang (less tha 3 ?) of higher SP players flying frigates will probably win the fight. But that same low SP player would die horribly to the same pack of high SP frigates if they were flying some other cruiser (such as a thorax).

For something like scamming, new players also have potential advantages. As a new player, the memories of some of the game mechanics or oddities with exchanging goods or services that confused you are more fresh in your mind. With a bit of clever thinking you can take advantage of that against older players who think they thoroughly understand how those mechanics work.

Shawna Gray
Gallente
Posted - 2009.12.13 10:35:00 - [16]
 

Originally by: Dian'h Might

Example:
Either of the two drone cruisers, regardless of SP (assuming you can at least sit in it and use all the modules/drones), will generally ruin a frig pilots day (sometimes several at once). Regardless of the SP of the person flying the frigate. A lower SP player jumping a vexor into a small gang (less tha 3 ?) of higher SP players flying frigates will probably win the fight. But that same low SP player would die horribly to the same pack of high SP frigates if they were flying some other cruiser (such as a thorax).



The real difference between a new player and a old one is that the new player is unlikely to know typical fits for ships, what targets to go for, how to counter typical ships/setups etc. So in the end its the older player that decides when to fight, and thats usually when he has the advantage.

Takseen
Posted - 2009.12.13 11:53:00 - [17]
 

I'm fairly new at the game, and know next to nothing about PvP. But I suspect that there's a limit to how good even the oldest toon can get at a particular form of pvp. For example for Frigate PvP, once you've got level V in your ship of choice, your fitting and rigging skills, T2 weapon specialisation etc, you just run out of stuff to train. After a certain point extra skill points just let you be better at lots of different things.
It might take you a year or more to max out a given speciality, but you'll gain 80% of the benefits in maybe 3 months, and the last 9 months is just training up tiny tiny bonuses like the extra 2% damage from Small Autocannon Specialisation V or whatever. And if you want to play a generalist, you just skip that stuff and move on.

Elena Laskova
Posted - 2009.12.13 12:03:00 - [18]
 

L5 in most skills is barely worth having, so on the surface it looks like high-SP characters don't have an overwhelming advantage.

Unfortunately there is a "blackmail" element to the skill system which provides a large advantage to older characters.

For a lot of skills (including prerequisite skills for important modules and ships) you must have an inefficient L5 skill before you can get L1 in something necessary.

You can *play* EvE with just a few SP. If you restrict what you do, you can play reasonably effectively with a few million(non-Learning) SP. But for full access to the game you need 10's of millions of SP.

Takseen
Posted - 2009.12.13 12:11:00 - [19]
 

I suspect that's why CCP dropped a lot of the Level V prerequisites in Dominion, to make it easier for new players to catch up in those areas.

Nitemare111
GoonWaffe
Goonswarm Federation
Posted - 2009.12.13 15:30:00 - [20]
 

Would've been nice if they'd dropped them before I spent weeks training some of them.

To the OP: A week old player, in a Rifter, with a scram and a web, can hold down a multi billion isk Dreadnought flown by a player with 60+ million SP for the rest of his corp to kill. That's how valuable and useful any player can be. SP isn't the be all and end all, unlike most MMOs. Using what skills you have in a smart way, and learning from your mistakes (and deaths), is the secret.

Yeah, the guy with 60+ million SP is going to have way more skills, and those at higher level, but he's not a god. Enjoy the fact that you just helped kill his billion isk toy with a ship that costs less than his ammo.

Marko Riva
Posted - 2009.12.13 20:20:00 - [21]
 

Edited by: Marko Riva on 13/12/2009 20:20:59
Apart from all that; being subscribed to a game longer doesn't somehow make one smarter, if someone's stupid he's going to stay stupid. If someone's lazy and cba to read and learn the game mechanics he'll stay dumb. You'd be surprised how many people there's out there that played for years and still have no ffing clue on the game and lack any sort of strategy or tactics, simply because their 2 braincells just can't cope with it.

In other words; if you're capable of not being stupid and you're willing to learn, invest some effort into KNOWING stuff instead of guessing, then you'll get far. Regardless of ingame age or SP count.

Kessiaan
Minmatar
Vagrants Inc
Posted - 2009.12.13 20:27:00 - [22]
 

Originally by: Nitemare111
Would've been nice if they'd dropped them before I spent weeks training some of them.


To be fair, all the stuff they dropped to Lv. 4 are skills you'll want to train to lv. 5 pretty quickly anyway.

To the OP:

Take everything you think you know about MMOs and throw it away. It seems to me that the reason so many people fail out of the gate is they come here expecting EvE to be like every other MMO where (roughly) time invested = your power level and it just doesn't work that way. In EvE it is possible to lose, and that changes the dynamic drastically.

As it specifically relates to skill points, they hit diminishing returns very quickly and if you've been playing more than a couple months will generally be the least important aspect of any given encounter.

Beyond the basic skills that do take a couple of months to get trained up, I've found the following is generally true...

- The more SPs are a person has, the fewer are in use at any given time. Older players have greater versatility, but any given role can be maxed (SP-wise) fairly quickly
- The larger the gang is, the less important the SPs of its individual members become. Skill points, specifically tightly-focused skill points, are hugely important solo but in gangs a lot less so. And in the big 0.0 fleets it doesn't matter at all, so long as you can fly the fit your FC has told you to fly.
- Also, in larger gangs there's much more room for strategy and tactics, which also will win (or lose) a lot more battles than your raw SP totals.
- Actual experience and player skill counts for much more than character skills.

TLDR: Skill points count for 2, maybe 3 months if you train intelligently for a combat role. After that they decline in importance very quickly from a pure combat standpoint, serving more as a check on what you can and can not fly and what roles you can perform.

Psiri
Posted - 2009.12.14 00:44:00 - [23]
 

Edited by: Psiri on 14/12/2009 00:45:24
Depends on what you want to do,

To truly compete in trading, you generally only need 2-3 months training. However, it's more ingame knowledge and isk that you need rather than actual skillpoints. Note that you can be a successful trader from day one, or once you have the isk that is, the SP is only needed to really compete in some areas.

Mining and missions will be profitable enough for you once you can do lvl IV's in a somewhat skilled for BS or mine in a Hulk, I'm not sure how long it'll take you to get there but I'm guessing at least 6 months (less for the Hulk)

PvP is doable from the 1st or 2nd week in a frigate, but it will take you well over 6 months to master one in terms of SP. As for cruisers, battlecruisers and battleships it really depends on the specific ship (some require more skillpoints due to type of tank, weapons, drones etc). I'd say that you can be as potent as most veteran PvP'ers in a specific Battlecruiser after a year, pherhaps even better off than most (so many people don't train their support skills as they should). In that year, assuming you've PvP'ed actively you should also be on a similar level of PvP knowhow.

Muzzer Fracker
Posted - 2009.12.14 04:31:00 - [24]
 

Edited by: Muzzer Fracker on 14/12/2009 04:33:11
Well, I have been training to fly an Eos, and couldnt help but notice the large gap between just "being able to pilot" one, and actually having all the relevant skills maxed out.
I do realise that a lowbie in a frigate can still be useful in PvP, but realistically a gang of lowbies in frigs is not going to do much against a gang of older toons that know what they're doing and have some ppl trained for ECM, ECCM and tackling (even if the gang of lowbie toons was played by veteran players).

I've been playing for about 6 months now and have been filling a logistics role while I wait to be able to fly an Eos, but I watch the older dps toons in my corp jump in bigger boats and be able to rep to about 90% of the effectiveness that I can just cause they can already fly bigger boats. The main differences being that they dont get the massive range bonus from ebing skilled for it, and that if we get attacked while repping something, I dont have half the tank they do from all their skills...

I guess for me, the most annoying thing is that I'm very limited in terms of ways I can earn income in a logistics boat. There aren't any missions (that I have seen at least) that require me to rep stuff up or run escort for something while providing remote tank. I realise I could still try to trade for money, but Im not skilled in any trade skills, and frankly, thats cause Im not really interested in that part of the game yet. I have a frig fitted out with some turrets as a last resort lvl 1 mission runner, but with under 100k sp in gunnery that's not very rewarding either.

But tbh, I realise that this is more of a question of how I approached my goals in-game, and my ignorance as to the possible means of income, rather than a problem of old vs. new. Nevertheless, at the rate Im going(that is to say, without completely overhauling my skill training regime to get dps or mining or trade skills for income), it will be a long time before I can happily say that I have the skills to make the most of an Eos, let alone be able to afford one with decent mods and rigs....

Mara Rinn
Posted - 2009.12.14 04:41:00 - [25]
 

Edited by: Mara Rinn on 14/12/2009 04:42:54
Originally by: Muzzer Fracker
I do realise that a lowbie in a frigate can still be useful in PvP, but realistically a gang of lowbies in frigs is not going to do much against a gang of older toons that know what they're doing and have some ppl trained for ECM, ECCM and tackling (even if the gang of lowbie toons was played by veteran players).


I have an alt that was trained to fly a frigate fitted with passive targeter, ship analyser and cargo scanner in about an hour after being created. Using the intel gathered by that anonymous alt, I can better pick which fights to get into or run away from.

If your new friends train up to fly covops frigates, they'll be able to assist in many instances without even getting into fights - traffic intel is extremely useful for PvP operations. Even better, training in covops frigates leads right into flying Recon ships such as the Arazu.

If you're trained to fly logistics now, just keep training the skills you'll need to fly a carrier. The path from Guardian to Archon could easily include flying a Dominix and building up your drone skills. Flying a T2 sentry domi with logistics modules, you'll me much more useful to any PvE gang. Use your logistics ship to rep friends in firefights - you can stay out of range of the battleship ACs and blasters.

As for generating income, check out the Beginner's Guide to Making ISK.

Sky Mart
Posted - 2009.12.14 04:51:00 - [26]
 

Not all missions are kill missions. There are courier and mining ones too. I made my first ISK with a badger II and hauling stuff between stations for a profit.

Use a program similar to EVEtradefinder http://www.eveonline.com/ingameboard.asp?a=topic&threadID=567365

Or team up with a DPS guy and do level 4 missions and rep him. I had to tag team the Worlds Collide mission for quite a while with me being the "healer" and my brother being the "tank".

If your in a 0.0 corp you can probably tag along with corp mates on complexes and rep them.

I'd suggest working up to a "Drake" equivalent ship as your training so that you can rat in 0.0 if your out there.

To really compete in 0.0 you going to need about 15million skill points in your base skills and ships... before that your mostly helpful in large fleet combat as a tackler. I started my 0.0 flying at about 8million skill points and usually had my butt handed to me. However, I gained great experience and by the time I was 15million skill points I actually had some idea of what I was supposed to be doing Twisted Evil

Use Evemon and plot your first ship..train for it and fly it well while you train for the next thing. You really have to decide what you want to do, to know what to train for though. I chose Missions as first priority so I could work on combat skills and make ISK till I was ready for 0.0

With the right group your never too young...I remember my brother almost taking out a CNR with a fleet of noobs. He ran scrams so the CNR couldn't attack and they kept bumping it off station so that he couldn't dock. When they got him below 1/2 health he started on local begging someone to bump him to Docking range for a nice fee. Someone took him up on it just before they got the kill. Could you imagine the kill mail CNR taken down by fleet of IBIS's Shocked

Cyprus Black
Caldari
Perkone
Posted - 2009.12.14 07:55:00 - [27]
 

Edited by: Cyprus Black on 14/12/2009 08:23:29
Not all EvE veterans have their SP in PvP oriented skills.

Regardless, if you're going up against an old player who's flying his most favorite tricked out PvP ship (the one he poured all his SP into), you're probably not going to win a 1v1. He's in his element.

However, if he's not or if you are with friends, you can easily shut him down and pod him.

There is no iWin button in EvE. No indestructible ship, no untouchable player, no unbeatable strategy, and rarely a "flavor of the month" ship that resists the nerf bat for long.

You need to break this notion that has been beaten into your skull from every other MMO. The one that says a level 1 newbie doesn't stand a chance against a level 80 pimped out veteran.

It's just not true in EvE. I can personally attest to the fact that a bunch of newbies in frigs are a considerable PvP force and not to be underestimated.

The only real advantage a veteran has over a newbie is game knowledge.

Real PvP strength isn't raw force. It's coming to the fight prepared, using your head, and outwitting your opponent and I'll share a personal example.

I once killed a battlecruiser with my little T1 rifter frigate. My skills in minmatar ships and weaponry are absolutely terrible.

The guy I killed was running missions in low sec. I scanned him down, tackled, webbed, killed his drones, and neuted him. Of course, my little autocannons (combined with terribad skills) weren't doing any damage to him. I think my best shot did eleven points of damage to his shields. But my DPS didn't matter.

He was warp scrambled so he couldn't warp away.
He was webbed so he wasn't going anywhere fast.
He had no cap left to repair himself because I was neuting him.
His guns were too large and slow to hit my tiny fast moving frigate.
He still had mission rats taking significant chunks out of his shields and armor.
His only defense against small targets were his crappy T1 drones which I destroyed.

In the end he refused to pay the ransom and was killed. I win, he loses. I didn't have the skills to destroy him, but I used my head and environment to my advantage and won. Here's the results:

Victim: (censored)
Corp: (censored)
Alliance: (censored)
Faction: NONE
Destroyed: Harbinger
System: Avair
Security: 0.4
Damage Taken: 55941

Involved parties:

Name: Defeater Alvatis / Unknown
Damage Done: 49090

Name: Cyprus Black (laid the final blow)
Security: 2.8
Corp: Perkone
Alliance: NONE
Faction: NONE
Ship: Rifter
Weapon: Small Energy Neutralizer I
Damage Done: 6851

Yarinor
Capital Construction Research
Pioneer Alliance
Posted - 2009.12.14 11:14:00 - [28]
 


Psiri
Posted - 2009.12.14 20:39:00 - [29]
 

Originally by: Muzzer Fracker
Well, I have been training to fly an Eos


Which is one of the most SP intensive ships you could pick, being a Fleet Command and a drone boat. =/

Liz Laser
The New Era
C0NVICTED
Posted - 2009.12.14 22:47:00 - [30]
 

Edited by: Liz Laser on 14/12/2009 22:49:19

Since Eve is a PvP MMORPG, the number of Skill Points you have aren't nearly as important as the friends you bring to a fight and choosing your battles.

I'm an ultra-casual industrialist, but I have a 94% efficiency on BattleClinic's Killboard. I recognized a weak alliance quickly enough not to risk big ships in their ops, I was later in a good alliance, and even later I was in a kickass alliance that I really had no business being in (got absorbed in a corporate merger) but enjoyed a great deal.

Who you are running around with is going to affect your success and enjoyment of the game far more than your skill points do.


Pages: [1] 2

This thread is older than 90 days and has been locked due to inactivity.


 


The new forums are live

Please adjust your bookmarks to https://forums.eveonline.com

These forums are archived and read-only