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Barakkus
Posted - 2009.10.12 22:18:00 - [1]
 

http://www.physorg.com/news174293159.html

Quote:
The world's most powerful particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), could be used to test the principles behind hyperdrive, a possible future form of spacecraft propulsion that could drive spacecraft at a good fraction of the speed of light.


Interesting idea, but will it go anywhere, and will it go anywhere in our lifetimes?

JordanParey
Suddenly Ninjas
Tear Extraction And Reclamation Service
Posted - 2009.10.13 00:01:00 - [2]
 

I'd like to preorder my Rifter-class vessel now, please.

MooKids
Caldari
The Graduates
Morsus Mihi
Posted - 2009.10.13 01:29:00 - [3]
 

Fraction of the speed of light isn't really that fast. It would be good for intrasystem travel, but would still be quite a long trip to reach the next system, requiring either cryogenics or generation ships.

Still, a good step.

Jin Nib
Resplendent Knives
Posted - 2009.10.13 01:39:00 - [4]
 

Im still waiting for the black hole.

Arvald
Caldari
Drunken Space Irish
Posted - 2009.10.13 02:27:00 - [5]
 

particle physics gives me a hadron

Intense Thinker
Minmatar
Posted - 2009.10.13 02:43:00 - [6]
 

Originally by: Arvald
particle physics gives me a hadron
Laughing

Neckbeard Griefmonger
Posted - 2009.10.13 03:44:00 - [7]
 

Well, my little '86 camery moves at a fraction of the speed of light too.

Haraldhardrade
Amarr
Pax Amarr
Posted - 2009.10.13 13:55:00 - [8]
 

Originally by: Barakkus

Interesting idea, but will it go anywhere, and will it go anywhere in our lifetimes?



It depends on how old you are, but most likaly yes. I'd read up on the singularity if you are unaware of Raymond Kurzweil. Basically, the rate of technological advances is speeding up and goes faster and faster. As in the last 100 year we have advanced more than we did in the previous 1000 year. And for the past 10 years we have advanced more than we have done in the past 100 years. And it will just continue to accelerate.


Xanos Blackpaw
Amarr
Inadeptus Mechanicus
Posted - 2009.10.13 14:41:00 - [9]
 

Originally by: Haraldhardrade
Originally by: Barakkus

Interesting idea, but will it go anywhere, and will it go anywhere in our lifetimes?



It depends on how old you are, but most likaly yes. I'd read up on the singularity if you are unaware of Raymond Kurzweil. Basically, the rate of technological advances is speeding up and goes faster and faster. As in the last 100 year we have advanced more than we did in the previous 1000 year. And for the past 10 years we have advanced more than we have done in the past 100 years. And it will just continue to accelerate.





in other words...in 1 year we have advanced further than during the 100 before that? and in 10 years we will have advanced about 10000 years in tech level?


sweet! i want my meachadrites and hovercar in chrome please. my robotic servant shall be in dark blue and i want my symbiote AI nanites to be named jarvis.

KingsGambit
Caldari Provisions
Posted - 2009.10.13 15:51:00 - [10]
 

I didn't realise FTL travel was such a big deal. I already invented it during a quiet spell but couldn't be bothered to make it public. Sadly, I've since thrown the designs away with old phone bills and bank statements. Maybe when I'm done with cold fusion I'll find the time to redo it.

Haraldhardrade
Amarr
Pax Amarr
Posted - 2009.10.13 16:03:00 - [11]
 

Edited by: Haraldhardrade on 13/10/2009 16:05:29
It's pretty damn amazing

The Law of Accelerating Returns
by Ray Kurzweil

An analysis of the history of technology shows that technological change is exponential, contrary to the common-sense "intuitive linear" view. So we won't experience 100 years of progress in the 21st century -- it will be more like 20,000 years of progress (at today's rate). The "returns," such as chip speed and cost-effectiveness, also increase exponentially. There's even exponential growth in the rate of exponential growth. Within a few decades, machine intelligence will surpass human intelligence, leading to The Singularity -- technological change so rapid and profound it represents a rupture in the fabric of human history. The implications include the merger of biological and nonbiological intelligence, immortal software-based humans, and ultra-high levels of intelligence that expand outward in the universe at the speed of light.

The first technological steps-sharp edges, fire, the wheel--took tens of thousands of years. For people living in this era, there was little noticeable technological change in even a thousand years. By 1000 A.D., progress was much faster and a paradigm shift required only a century or two. In the nineteenth century, we saw more technological change than in the nine centuries preceding it. Then in the first twenty years of the twentieth century, we saw more advancement than in all of the nineteenth century. Now, paradigm shifts occur in only a few years time. The World Wide Web did not exist in anything like its present form just a few years ago; it didn't exist at all a decade ago.


http://www.kurzweilai.net/articles/art0134.html?printable=1

Thorliaron
Brutor Tribe
Posted - 2009.10.13 19:23:00 - [12]
 

Originally by: Barakkus
http://www.physorg.com/news174293159.html

Quote:
The world's most powerful particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), could be used to test the principles behind hyperdrive, a possible future form of spacecraft propulsion that could drive spacecraft at a good fraction of the speed of light.


Interesting idea, but will it go anywhere, and will it go anywhere in our lifetimes?


i hope not, rather not have a area of europe zoom off into space, might be a bit messy

Sys Root
Posted - 2009.10.13 20:27:00 - [13]
 

So what happens when your spaceship hits a rock at a few million km/h? Even a tiny piece of space debris would omgwtfpwn your ship at those speeds, we need shields and/or some other means protection before we can propulse ships at "a good fraction of the speed of light"

Blane Xero
Amarr
The Firestorm Cartel
Posted - 2009.10.13 20:29:00 - [14]
 

Originally by: Sys Root
So what happens when your spaceship hits a rock at a few million km/h? Even a tiny piece of space debris would omgwtfpwn your ship at those speeds, we need shields and/or some other means protection before we can propulse ships at "a good fraction of the speed of light"
More likely the rock would be vaporised i would think.

ReaperOfSly
Gallente
Underworld Protection Agency
South Pole Dancers
Posted - 2009.10.13 21:30:00 - [15]
 

Quote:
In the hypervelocity propulsion drive a relativistic particle would repel a stationary mass at a speed greater than its own.


Bad article. Naughty. Wrong. It's not speed, it's momentum which is a whole different kettle of fish. Unless I'm interpreting the article incorrectly of course.

Barakkus
Posted - 2009.10.13 22:53:00 - [16]
 

I personally would just like to be able to take a trip across the solar system before I die, don't care too much about leaving it, I doubt it's very exciting, just the same old stuff :P

Rin Chan
Posted - 2009.10.14 23:40:00 - [17]
 

Anyone else get images of switzerland suddenly taking off and flying away in their head?

yani dumyat
Minmatar
Pixie Cats
Posted - 2009.10.15 13:00:00 - [18]
 

Originally by: Barakkus

will it go anywhere in our lifetimes?



Originally by: Haraldhardrade

The Law of Accelerating Returns by Ray Kurzweil



Ignoring for a moment the images of interplanetary Swiss people bearing gifts of toblerone for any aliens they might meet, the concept of the technological singularity puts a huge question on what you mean by lifetime.

The average lifespan of a human is being extended in an exponential fashion that is linked to the rate of change of technology so 'our lifetimes' may mean very different things for a 15 yr old and a 50yr old.

Barring major accident or disease the 50 yr old will most likely have 30 or more years of active life left at todays technological level, and once their body does start to majorly deteriorate there's likely to be little we can do to help other than give them as much dignity as we can.

The 15 year old on the other hand has an extra 35 years till they reach the age of 50 by which time there may well be treatments available that slow the process of ageing. By the time they reach the age of 80 they may have the physical age of a 60 year old and during that 30 year time period the increased rate of technological change has created even more advanced treatments that can stop or even reverse the effects of ageing which means the 15 year old could potentially live for hundreds or thousands of years.

So yeah there's probably someone alive today who'll see a hyperdrive space ship but i'd still hold off on that order for a rifter class vessel for now Razz

PS see the 2nd link in my sig for more info on how old age is being considered a treatable condition (aka transhumanity) and the technological singularity.

Barakkus
Posted - 2009.10.15 13:34:00 - [19]
 

I personally think we won't be able to make it so humans live past ~120 years old...think that's the hard limit to our species.

Being 33, I figure I got another 40 years ahead of me, hopefully it'll happen before I'm old and decrepit, but prolly not.

soldieroffortune 258
Gallente
Tribal Liberation Force
Posted - 2009.10.15 16:35:00 - [20]
 

Originally by: Neckbeard Griefmonger
Well, my little '86 camery moves at a fraction of the speed of light too.





Originally by:
stationary mass to a sizeable proportion of the speed of light.





WTB '86 4-Banger Import that can go a few thousand miles per second . . . Laughing

Eran Laude
Gallente
Federal Defence Union
Posted - 2009.10.15 16:41:00 - [21]
 

Cool :D

Hyperdrives would be **** for interstellar travel, but being able to hop between the planets would be a technological achievement close to a singularity.

BiggestT
Caldari
Amarrian Retribution
Posted - 2009.10.15 17:17:00 - [22]
 

Originally by: Haraldhardrade
Edited by: Haraldhardrade on 13/10/2009 16:05:29
There's even exponential growth in the rate of exponential growth. Within a few decades, machine intelligence will surpass human intelligence, leading to The Singularity


Stopped reading after that.


What a load of rubbish, "The singularity"

ugh, such a 'tarded deterministic non-scientific approach that anyone sucked in by it needs a slap in the downstairs.


Last I checked, idiots predicting the future and saying some PC-god will inject us in to cyberspace is not amazing at all.

yani dumyat
Minmatar
Pixie Cats
Posted - 2009.10.15 17:34:00 - [23]
 

Originally by: BiggestT


What a load of rubbish, "The singularity"



NASA would like to disagree with you

BiggestT
Caldari
Amarrian Retribution
Posted - 2009.10.15 17:45:00 - [24]
 

Originally by: yani dumyat
Originally by: BiggestT


What a load of rubbish, "The singularity"



NASA would like to disagree with you


How about you read your damn sources, the only link NASA and that school have with the singularity is the name Rolling Eyes

The EVE test server is called Singularity, does that mean its already happeneing???!!!!111




If Merin were here he'd have a field day Laughing

Foodpimp
Gallente
Heaven's Harvesters
LEGIO ASTARTES ARCANUM
Posted - 2009.10.15 18:11:00 - [25]
 

Originally by: Rin Chan
Anyone else get images of switzerland suddenly taking off and flying away in their head?


Dude...that's crazy...

It's not that Switzerland would take off into space, but rather.....the rest of the universe would move around it.

Dan O'Connor
Cerberus Network
Dignitas.
Posted - 2009.10.17 11:30:00 - [26]
 

Originally by: Barakkus
http://www.physorg.com/news174293159.html

Quote:
The world's most powerful particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), could be used to test the principles behind hyperdrive, a possible future form of spacecraft propulsion that could drive spacecraft at a good fraction of the speed of light.


Interesting idea, but will it go anywhere, and will it go anywhere in our lifetimes?



Okay so I'm not entirely an expert on these kinds of very special theories. So I need to be clear on something. The Theory Of Relativity states that the faster something with a mass goes, the heavier it gets, and ultimately would have infinite mass at full speed of light (which is why they can only get to 99.99% the speed in the Collider). So far so good.

This effect would probably come into play when used on larger scale objects, say, ships. They would have to compensate for the increasing amount of their own mass, no (even if not coming near the full speed of light) ?

Another issue I see on this is the Time Dilatation effect. Although getting pretty extreme and critical at velocities near the speed of light (according to the Special Theory Of Relativity), this would still play a role on this. Basically it means that for the pilots in a ship using this technique less time would have passed than for people outside, observing them.

I'm not an expert, and these are the issues I see. I might be wrong though.

MaxxOmega
Caldari
Temporal Mechanics
Posted - 2009.10.17 19:55:00 - [27]
 

Originally by: Dan O'Connor
The Theory Of Relativity states that the faster something with a mass goes, the heavier it gets
But the heavier I get, the slower I move. It's called the Theory Of Fat Slobism...

Dan O'Connor
Cerberus Network
Dignitas.
Posted - 2009.10.17 20:45:00 - [28]
 

Originally by: MaxxOmega
Originally by: Dan O'Connor
The Theory Of Relativity states that the faster something with a mass goes, the heavier it gets
But the heavier I get, the slower I move. It's called the Theory Of Fat Slobism...



Hmm... interesting factor indeed! Very HappyShocked

Adonis 4174
Posted - 2009.10.18 02:55:00 - [29]
 

I heard there were theories by scientists involved in the LHC that the first failure was due to a particle coming back through time from an experiment run in the future.

Northern Fall
Minmatar
British Legion
Posted - 2009.10.18 10:56:00 - [30]
 

Cool


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