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blankseplocked Red speres in the scan view, do they really mean what they pretend?
 
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Robert Caldera
Posted - 2009.04.11 14:49:00 - [1]
 

I've spent some time on scanning now and I really doubt the speres mean there is a ship "somewhere IN the spere", every time I wanted to scan on luck not covering the entire sphere (slightly lower coverage) there was never a scan result!
But each single time I tried that? The probability of having such bad luck isnt realistic I would say, the other solution for this mystery could be the fact CCP fools us with the new probing system,
telling us the red circles are possible locations of the probed ship but in fact the red areas are just a HAVE TO cover areas making probing more difficult.

What are your thoughts on this? Did I merely had too bad luck while probing?

Tippia
Caldari
Sunshine and Lollipops
Posted - 2009.04.11 14:52:00 - [2]
 

No, a sphere means there is a hit somewhere on the surface of the sphere.

You get a sphere when you get a hit from only one of your probes, and since that probe only measures the distance to the target, the best it can give you is that distance in every possible direction.

Sydian Rie
Minmatar
Black Aces
Against ALL Authorities
Posted - 2009.04.11 15:00:00 - [3]
 

Simple way to fix this is to launch 3 more probes after you get the sphere and cover the sphere with each probe on all 4 sides to get a red dot. It also skips the red ring.

Jana Clant
New Dawn Corp
New Eden Research.
Posted - 2009.04.11 15:01:00 - [4]
 

Correct procedure for dealing with spheres on the scanning system:

- Small spheres (smaller than 8 AU)
Set your probe size so they all envelop the sphere entirely but the probes are spread enough as far as possible. The full intersection area (where all the 4 probes have a signal) should have the red sphere completely inside it. Scanning after positioning them like this will give you a red point to track down, which is much more accurate.

- Large spheres (8 AU and larger)
Having all the probes intersect the sphere without stacking them on top of each other may be impossible here, so leave one of your probes on the center of the red sphere, with the other three on the edge of the main probe's sphere, forming a triangle. You'll get a circle if the target site gets intersected by two probes, or two points if it's intersected by three.

Xenoxide
Caldari
Deep Core Mining Inc.
Posted - 2009.04.11 15:05:00 - [5]
 

As said, when one probe gets a hit that gives you a sphere. It signifies the distance from the probe, so the hit is on the surface somewhere. Not inside it.

When two probes get a hit on the same object, you'll get a ring. This means the object is somewhere on the ring, not inside it.

When three get a hit you'll get two dots. This is because three probes can triangulate on a single 2D plane, so it doesn't know if the hit is above or below the plane.

With four probes getting the hit, you should get a single dot. The further the probes are away from the hit, the weaker the signal, so the reported position may not be correct. Move the probes closer so the signal gets stronger and the location gets more exact.

When the hit turns green, you can warp to it.

Robert Caldera
Posted - 2009.04.11 15:33:00 - [6]
 

oh ty

very good explanations.

ROXGenghis
Perkone
Posted - 2009.04.11 15:55:00 - [7]
 

Edited by: ROXGenghis on 11/04/2009 22:35:35
I believe there's some wrong info in this thread. The hit is on the surface of the sphere PLUS OR MINUS DEVIATION. So the hit is 50% likely to be inside the sphere, and 50% likely to be outside the sphere. This deviation can be rather large, so it's critical to train up your astrometric pinpointing to minimize it. You'll always have some deviation, though.

Same goes for red circles....the hit isn't on the circle, it's within a donut shape with the circle defining the shape of the donut.

I'm open to corrections on my interpretation.

Rakshasa Taisab
Caldari
Sane Industries Inc.
Posted - 2009.04.11 16:56:00 - [8]
 

Originally by: Tippia
No, a sphere means there is a hit somewhere on the surface of the sphere.

You get a sphere when you get a hit from only one of your probes, and since that probe only measures the distance to the target, the best it can give you is that distance in every possible direction.

And what a lot of people miss is that you also have to add the scan deviation, which means the real hit can be at a distance from the surface of the sphere. And not just inwards, but also outwards.

Taedrin
Gallente
Kushan Industrial
Posted - 2009.04.11 18:53:00 - [9]
 

Originally by: ROXGenghis
I believe there's some wrong info in this thread. The hit is on the surface of the sphere PLUS OR MINUS DEVIATION. So the hit is 50% likely to be inside the sphere, and 50% likely to be outside the sphere. This deviation can be rather large, so it's critical to train up your astrometric pinpointing to minimize it. You'll always have some deviation, though.

Same goes for red circles....the hit isn't on the circle, it's within a donut shape with the circle as the central axis of the donut.

I'm open to corrections on my interpretation.


Only correction I would make is that if the hit is close to the probes scan range, then the hit is more likely to be inside the sphere instead of outside. Example:
Your probe has a range of 5au, and you get a hit at 4au If your deviation is +-2au then that means the hit could be anywhere from 5-2 au away from the 4au sphere. This is because the hit can't POSSIBLY be anywhere from 5-6au since your probe can't reach that far. Therefore in this example there is a 33% chance that the hit is outside the sphere and a 66% chance that the hit is inside the sphere.


 

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