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blankseplocked pirate all your music! [not condoning piracy]
 
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Che22a
Minmatar
Social Outcast's
Posted - 2008.12.26 02:18:00 - [1]
 

Edited by: Che22a on 26/12/2008 02:21:28
"On Friday, the RIAA announced it was abandoning its legal strategy of suing individuals for copyright infringement, and said it had not sued anybody for months."
"Under the RIAA's new strategy, internet service providers will notify (.pdf) alleged copyright infringers detected by the RIAA that they need to cease their alleged infringement of the industry's music. Three-time offenders face losing internet access."
-source

Do you guys think that this will see a rise in music piracy now that one does not face such harsh penalties as jail time or fines? I do not think that any state or federal government will push for a BAN on internet activity on individuals who violate this new policy. Yay for private companies!You can just switch providers. ^_^

Ivana Drake
Caldari
Posted - 2008.12.26 03:23:00 - [2]
 

seeing that only the careless people got sued anyway (like that mother who used her credit card to subscribe to Kazaa Pro and then downloaded loads of copyrighted music thinking it was legal, only to then get sued for some ridiculous amount of money which she never actually paid) I don't think anything will change.

Really though, how would ISPs even detect this? How do they differentiate between the person torrenting a pirated movie and the person running completely legal P2P On-demand TV? (like Veoh, or 4OD)

Phantom Slave
Universal Pest Exterminators
Posted - 2008.12.26 04:39:00 - [3]
 

Originally by: Ivana Drake
seeing that only the careless people got sued anyway (like that mother who used her credit card to subscribe to Kazaa Pro and then downloaded loads of copyrighted music thinking it was legal, only to then get sued for some ridiculous amount of money which she never actually paid) I don't think anything will change.

Really though, how would ISPs even detect this? How do they differentiate between the person torrenting a pirated movie and the person running completely legal P2P On-demand TV? (like Veoh, or 4OD)


The only way to really keep track of them is to connect to the same torrents you're on, and see your IP as a user. Not hard, every torrent program I've used has the ability to see every IP you're connected to. Another option is to seed it themselves (the ISP or RIAA), and anybody on their own network that starts downloading, BAM you're caught.

It's not as hard as you would think.

Jake Silence
Posted - 2008.12.26 09:32:00 - [4]
 

Pirate all your music (in game).

Davina Braben
Posted - 2008.12.26 11:02:00 - [5]
 

This policy was a total non-deterrent anyway.

Too bad they didn't catch on quick enough for us all not to be cheering when the music industry goes **** up.

Keta Min
El Bastardos
Freedom of Elbas
Posted - 2008.12.26 13:41:00 - [6]
 

The industry's initial mistake was to call the copyright violation practice "piracy". It all went downhill for them from that point.

Arianhod
Red Dwarf Mining Corporation
space weaponry and trade
Posted - 2008.12.26 13:53:00 - [7]
 

Originally by: Keta Min
The industry's initial mistake was to call the copyright violation practice "piracy". It all went downhill for them from that point.
Aye, because piracy is synonymous with a romantic view of freedom...

Do what you want cos a Pirate is free - You Are a Pirate!

Ebodhisatva
The Templars Knights
Posted - 2008.12.26 15:32:00 - [8]
 

One small ISP in Louisiana asks the recording organization, "You want me to police your intellectual property? What's your billing address?"

http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-10127841-93.html


Jim McGregor
Posted - 2008.12.26 16:16:00 - [9]
 

Originally by: Che22a

Do you guys think that this will see a rise in music piracy now that one does not face such harsh penalties as jail time or fines?


Nobody cared before and nobody cares now. It has taken them like a decade to figure out that they cant stop piracy by putting random people in jail. They are not too bright, which is also the reason why they cant figure out alternatives to piracy that works (like Spotify for example, which actually has a good chance of pulling people away from downloaded music).


Vega Alioth
Caldari
Posted - 2008.12.26 17:01:00 - [10]
 

people will always pirate music - whether its recording mix tapes, downloading it from the internet or the new way that will be invented when torrent downloading is eradicated.

ceaon
Posted - 2008.12.26 19:06:00 - [11]
 

OP here you have a better link http://recordingindustryvspeople.blogspot.com/

Xen Gin
Silurian Operations
Posted - 2008.12.26 19:49:00 - [12]
 

Originally by: Phantom Slave
Another option is to seed it themselves (the ISP or RIAA), and anybody on their own network that starts downloading, BAM you're caught.


That would be illegal, entrapment/honey potting is against the law in the US/UK, and any evidence would be inadmissible, as well running the risk of being found guilty of entrapment.

They simply cannot offer you the real deal, because they would be breaking the law.

Gojyu
Ever Flow
Axiom Empire
Posted - 2008.12.26 23:10:00 - [13]
 

Edited by: Gojyu on 26/12/2008 23:11:33
Originally by: Xen Gin
Originally by: Phantom Slave
Another option is to seed it themselves (the ISP or RIAA), and anybody on their own network that starts downloading, BAM you're caught.


That would be illegal, entrapment/honey potting is against the law in the US/UK, and any evidence would be inadmissible, as well running the risk of being found guilty of entrapment.

They simply cannot offer you the real deal, because they would be breaking the law.


Entrapment only applies to law enforcement officials. Companies seeding their own files is a very common occurrence. The biggest case I can personally remember was valve leaking half-life 2 a couple of days before release.

Xen Gin
Silurian Operations
Posted - 2008.12.26 23:47:00 - [14]
 

Edited by: Xen Gin on 26/12/2008 23:48:23
Edited by: Xen Gin on 26/12/2008 23:47:10
Originally by: Gojyu
Edited by: Gojyu on 26/12/2008 23:11:33
Originally by: Xen Gin
Originally by: Phantom Slave
Another option is to seed it themselves (the ISP or RIAA), and anybody on their own network that starts downloading, BAM you're caught.


That would be illegal, entrapment/honey potting is against the law in the US/UK, and any evidence would be inadmissible, as well running the risk of being found guilty of entrapment.

They simply cannot offer you the real deal, because they would be breaking the law.


Entrapment only applies to law enforcement officials. Companies seeding their own files is a very common occurrence. The biggest case I can personally remember was valve leaking half-life 2 a couple of days before release.


Honey potting applies to all entities. If an IT or music industry is offering people access to their IP's and then calling it in on them, they can't do that, it's against the law.

Yes, they can 'leak' something, but they wont be able to take legal action on the people who obtained the 'leaked' data.


 

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