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Eddie Knight
Caldari Provisions
Posted - 2008.06.19 15:36:00 - [271]
 

Hello jna, I must say this is one of the best threads I've ever read! Well done!

I have a corp name (my ex-corp) for you to look at: "Empirius Enigmus".

jna
Caldari
Infinite Improbability Inc
-Mostly Harmless-
Posted - 2008.06.19 15:53:00 - [272]
 

Edited by: jna on 19/06/2008 15:53:10
Originally by: jna
However, even as cousins, anyone familiar with Latin will recognise much cross-over with the Slovak verb vidieť ("to see") here:

1st Pers Sing: vidím
2nd Pers Sing: vidíš
3rd Pers Sing: vidí
1st Pers Plur: vidíme
2nd Pers Plur: vidíte
3rd Pers Plur: vidia


For your lexical pleasure, I had a request ingame to expand these side-by-side (Slovak and Latin) which are here:

Decline "to see"
Slovak: vidieť
Latin: video


Slovak Latin English
1st Pers Sing: vidím video I see
2nd Pers Sing: vidíš vides You see
3rd Pers Sing: vidí videt He/she/it sees
1st Pers Plur: vidíme videmus We see
2nd Pers Plur: vidíte videtis You (pl) see
3rd Pers Plur: vidia vident They see


Edit: typo goddamit

Waagaa Ktlehr
Amarr
GeoCorp.
-Mostly Harmless-
Posted - 2008.06.19 15:53:00 - [273]
 

Originally by: jna
Edited by: jna on 19/06/2008 09:48:49
Originally by: Waagaa Ktlehr
Edited by: Waagaa Ktlehr on 19/06/2008 09:22:23
Originally by: jna

a) mis-spelling Iliad, and



I converted the "original name" to roman letters, how exactly is that mis-spelling?

The original is spelled:

Iota - Lambda - Iota - Alpha - Sigma. You could say that I added one to many "l" in my name.


Fair enough if you chose to transliterate into Ilias, I guess, though it flies in the face of convention for the most-commonly understood translation.

I mean, I can transliterate the Arabic for "The king is dead" into the english "Shah ma'at", and it'll be correct as well. But everyone else understands the word "checkmate" much better.



It's odd how the English language Translates Ilias to Iliad and Homeros to Homer. The word Ilias is based on the word Ilion, which means "The old one", it's the Greek name for the city of Troy. (tau rho omicron iota alpha) English has a pretty big history of maiming words from ancient languages and give it their own spin.

I'm not entirely sure who is going against convention here. In the Dutch Gymnasium (form of high school) and University we get taught about Ilias, Homeros, Troie, all terms much closer to the original forms of the words.

Now we could get into a discussion whether the sigma was more pronounced as a "d", "z" or "s", but I don't think we'll ever see the end of that one. It's generally assumed that it's an "s" kind of sound, especially at the end of a word. According to my former teacher it was pronounced something like Iliaas (The a is a long one)

Originally by: jna

Going back to Carpe Universitas though. You obviously have understanding of grammar, so I'm frankly appalled that you think it's "ok" to confuse Nominatives and Accusatives.

Let me illustrate how this isn't a matter of dialect or the evolution of languages - it's fundamentally a matter of meaning.

SENTENCE 1: Comitatus Fratrum Naves Goonorum Vincabunt

See what I did there? Yes, I evolved Latin to create Goonus, -i 2nd declension for "goons"

SENTENCE 2: Comitatum Fratrum Naves Goonorum Vincabunt

There is one letter difference between the 2 sentences. Comitatus becomes Comitatum. ie - just like you say it's a matter of dialect for diem (Accusative) to become dies (Nominative) - I've shifted Comitatum (Accusative) to become Comitatus (Nominative).

Sentence 1 means "Band of Brothers will defeat Goonfleet"
Sentence 2 means "Goonfleet will defeat Band of Brothers"

I'd say that single letter and case change illustrates my point quite nicely Very Happy

Edit: typo


I say that context normally solves a lot of ambiguity. It can be the freedom of an author to play with words. And if everyone knows what it means, it doesn't hurt the message that it's trying to give. And that right there is the primary goal of a language: to transport a message from one party to another.

jna
Caldari
Infinite Improbability Inc
-Mostly Harmless-
Posted - 2008.06.19 16:40:00 - [274]
 

Originally by: Nofonno

Shocked

My hat is off to you, kind sir. Is linguistics something you do professionally?


No, not really, but it's my background. Latin for 12 years Shocked, then I passed up a place at university to read ASNAC (Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic) to read Arabic instead. Etymology and linguistics is a pet subject of mine, and yes, I'm a nerd, it's true.

Replying to Waagaa, in a different order to the postings if I may:

Originally by: jna
you rather spoiled the fairly thin veneer of learned etymology in your argument

^^ I apologise unreservedly for this btw. Uncalled for and plain rude. Blame the conference call (idiots! idiots I tell you!) for my bad temperament here.

And your point about the difference in Homeric dates was entirely correct, and I misread/misunderstood it. Embarassed


Originally by: Waagaa Ktlehr
Now we could get into a discussion whether the sigma was more pronounced as a "d", "z" or "s", but I don't think we'll ever see the end of that one

/agreed with pleasure

contd below

jna
Caldari
Infinite Improbability Inc
-Mostly Harmless-
Posted - 2008.06.19 16:41:00 - [275]
 

Edited by: jna on 19/06/2008 17:54:26
Edited by: jna on 19/06/2008 17:43:13
Originally by: Waagaa Ktlehr

I say that context normally solves a lot of ambiguity. It can be the freedom of an author to play with words. And if everyone knows what it means, it doesn't hurt the message that it's trying to give. And that right there is the primary goal of a language: to transport a message from one party to another.

I agree with this in the context of modern languages with weaker lexicons than Latin.

Latin, however, leaves little-to-no room for explicit or implicit contextual ambiguity simply by the strength of its grammar.

English, for example, is ridiculously weak lexically, where the grammatical load of the sentence is carried by positional cues. A statement such as "The miner gave the pirate the mineral" only makes sense because of the convention that the subject precedes the verb, which precedes the indirect object, which precedes the direct object. Changing the order - "The mineral gave the miner the pirate" - changes the meaning.

In Latin (as in many older natural languages) the inflexions for noun number and case render word order almost entirely obsolete, except in cases of potential ambiguity. Cuniculator mineralem piratae dedit and Mineralem dedit cuniculator piratae both mean "The miner gave the pirate the mineral".

This flexibility is possible because Latin uses inflexion, not position, to denote lexical roles. The lack of a suffix denotes that the miner (cuniculator) is the subject; the -ae ending indicates that the pirate (piratae) is the indirect object; whilst the -em ending indicates that the mineral (minerale) is the direct object.

To say "The mineral gave the miner the pirate", one would write: Minerale piratam cuniculatori dedit, or any word order variation thereof, such as Cuniculatori dedit minerale piratem.

So, as in the "BoB/Goonfleet" example I gave overleaf, the cases, tenses, genders and (to a far lesser extent, and only in ambiguities) positions of the words make all the difference, and can carry - as in my example - an entirely opposite meaning, simply by the change of a single letter.

If you say it's all about conveying meaning, then Noms vs Accs really, really matter more than anything, especially in a language that has the inflectional vs positional tools to distinguish them apart.

Originally by: Waagaa Ktlehr
It's odd how the English language Translates Ilias to Iliad and Homeros to Homer.... English has a pretty big history of maiming words from ancient languages and give it their own spin.

I'm not entirely sure who is going against convention here. In the Dutch Gymnasium (form of high school) and University we get taught about Ilias, Homeros, Troie, all terms much closer to the original forms of the words.

Most interesting. Though I perceive myself as relatively multi-lingual, I believe this shows I am guilty of placing an anglo-centric perspective on translation/transliteration. We Brits often have a problem with the whole "English is the world's language, and it's our language first, therefore..." thing... <-- this thought annoys me no end, and it might be a time for some quiet reflection on some fairly wise words from Waagaa.
Edit: bolding latin bits
Edit2: Making it more eve-ready with miners, minerals and pirates :)

Ryushe
Tengo Kagegetsu
Posted - 2008.06.19 18:17:00 - [276]
 

Edited by: Ryushe on 19/06/2008 18:22:54
Sir jna,

A few of my favorites for you.

Rident stolidi verba latina.
Quiquid latine dictum sit, altum viditur.
Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.
Si hic carrus commovet non quaerete.
Cogito sumere potum alterum.
Semper ubi sub ubi.
Vi Veri Vniversum Vivus Vici. (So appropriate to eve I think.)

(I will leave the above as an exercise to the reader, or until Mr. jna deems himself worthy to translate them for you Very Happy)

And my all time favorite, even though I know it's bastard Latin: Veni. Vidi. Velcro!

Edit:
Speaking of corp names and such, one of my favorites in EVE has to Raptus Regaliter, meaning loosely translated, Royally Screwed Very Happy

jna
Caldari
Infinite Improbability Inc
-Mostly Harmless-
Posted - 2008.06.19 19:02:00 - [277]
 

Edited by: jna on 19/06/2008 19:05:45
Originally by: Ryushe
Edited by: Ryushe on 19/06/2008 18:22:54
Sir jna,

A few of my favorites for you.

Rident stolidi verba latina.
Quiquid latine dictum sit, altum viditur.
Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.
Si hic carrus commovet non quaerete.
Cogito sumere potum alterum.
Semper ubi sub ubi.
Vi Veri Vniversum Vivus Vici. (So appropriate to eve I think.)

(I will leave the above as an exercise to the reader, or until Mr. jna deems himself worthy to translate them for you Very Happy)

And my all time favorite, even though I know it's bastard Latin: Veni. Vidi. Velcro!

Edit:
Speaking of corp names and such, one of my favorites in EVE has to Raptus Regaliter, meaning loosely translated, Royally Screwed Very Happy

All good, and many approvals Very Happy

Rident stolidi verba Latina. A classic quote from Ovid: "Only fools laugh at the Latin Language"

Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum sonatur. "Whatever is said in Latin sounds profound." (you misspelt it as 'quiquid' btw)

Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes. "If you know how to read this, you are far too over-educated" (my sister-in-law gave me a T-shirt with this printed on it Cool)

Si hic carrus commovet non quaerete - literally "If this cart is moving a lot, dont ask". Modern version "If this cart is a-rockin, don't come a-knocking"

Cogito sumere potum alterum. "I think I'll have another drink." Better with the "ergo" for 'therefore' to provide contrast with the classic Cogito ergo sum eg Cogito ergo sumere potum alterum.

Semper ubi sub ubi. Deeply silly Latin, but very funny - pretty much meaning "Always wear underwear"; the literal translation being "Always where under where." Very Happy

Vi veri universum vivus vici "By the power of truth, I, while living, have conquered the universe". Aleister Crowley's motto btw.

Veni. Vidi. Velcro. Silly, very silly =D

Edit: Raptus Regaliter <-- love that, and it's good Latin too Cool

Tyr Vaantau
Amarr
Ragnarok Engineering
Clear Skies Darkening
Posted - 2008.06.19 19:28:00 - [278]
 

I did Latin at school for 5 years.

Can't remember a single damn thing about it though.

jna
Caldari
Infinite Improbability Inc
-Mostly Harmless-
Posted - 2008.06.19 20:12:00 - [279]
 

Originally by: Eddie Knight
Hello jna, I must say this is one of the best threads I've ever read! Well done!

I have a corp name (my ex-corp) for you to look at: "Empirius Enigmus".


The prognosis is bad... Nurse! The screens!

Empirius isn't good. You can have Impirius (1st declension nominative adjective, Medieval Latin, uncommon) or Empyrius (1st declension nominative adjective, very late Medieval Latin, very rare), but not really Empirius, which falls between two isoglossical stools.

Impirius and Empyrius both mean "fiery".

Equally, Enigmus isn't good either. Assuming you're going for something related to the English-langauge concept of "enigma, puzzle, riddle etc.", then enigma is Medieval Latin of the 3rd declension. NB. This is unusual, as you'd expect it to be 1st decl like Mensa, but according to my Medieval Latin dictionary, it's enigma, enigmatis, with a few citations as well...

In which case, enigmus isn't part of the declension at all, and thus rates "non-Latin" status.

Were you trying for "Fiery puzzle"? Tell me what your old corp thought it meant in English, and I can go from there :)

Eddie Knight
Caldari Provisions
Posted - 2008.06.19 21:49:00 - [280]
 

Edited by: Eddie Knight on 19/06/2008 21:58:33
Edited by: Eddie Knight on 19/06/2008 21:55:48
Thank you.

Even if it's been a while since I've learned Latin in school, I had my doubts about the name. I will ask about what the CEO wanted it to mean but in the meantime, I can tell you what I thought it should mean: Enigmatic Empire. This is because Empirius Enigmus is closer too "Imperiul Enigmatic" than anything else in Romanian and most of our words originate from Latin.

I'll be back with the CEO's answer once I get it. :)

Edit: now that I think of it, I guess Enigmatic Empire would be something like Imperium Enigmae, Imperium Enigmatis or Imperium Aenigmaticus. Got the last one from here.

Nofonno
Amarr
Posted - 2008.06.20 08:13:00 - [281]
 

Originally by: jna
Edited by: jna on 19/06/2008 19:05:45

* snip *

Vi veri universum vivus vici "By the power of truth, I, while living, have conquered the universe". Aleister Crowley's motto btw.

* snip*



If possible I would like to see this one disassembled, if I can make similar meaning in five words in Slovak, too Laughing

Corpsecrow
Posted - 2008.06.20 08:19:00 - [282]
 

Semper ubi sub ubi

Adam Weishaupt
Minmatar
Impel Industrial
Posted - 2008.06.20 08:31:00 - [283]
 

This is a great thread. Thanks. I was a latin nerd for a brief period in HS but never had the time to commit to it. I also flirted with being a classics major and learned a bit of Ancient Greek. A good experience even if I made the tragic and mundane decision to go for the 'useful' stuff instead.

jna
Caldari
Infinite Improbability Inc
-Mostly Harmless-
Posted - 2008.06.20 10:01:00 - [284]
 

Originally by: Nofonno
Originally by: jna
Edited by: jna on 19/06/2008 19:05:45

* snip *

Vi veri universum vivus vici "By the power of truth, I, while living, have conquered the universe". Aleister Crowley's motto btw.

* snip*



If possible I would like to see this one disassembled, if I can make similar meaning in five words in Slovak, too Laughing


Sure thing!

Vi is the Ablative Singular of the 3rd declension feminine noun vis, vis meaning "strength, force or power". Being Ablative, this gets the sense of "By, with or from", so makes "By the power".

veri is the Genitive Singular of the 2nd declension neuter noun verum, veri meaning "truth, reality or fact". Being Genitive, this gets the sense of "of truth".

Here it must be noted that the sentence does not contain a stated Nominative noun, so it is assumed that the Nominative subject comes from the verb below ("I")

vivus is the Nominitive Singular adjective of vivus, viva, vivum meaning "alive, fresh or living". Being nominative it must be applied to the "I", so "alive" or "whilst living"

vici is the 1st person Perfect Active Indicative of the 3rd declension verb vinco, vincere, vici, victus meaning "conquer, defeat or outlast". Being in the case noted earlier, this gets the sense of "I have conquered".

universum is the Accusative Singular of the 2nd declension Masculine noun Universus, universi meaning "universe". It should be noted, however, that this isn't a very common word for "universe", which is much more usually "universitas". Being Accusative, this becomes the object of the sentence, the thing that has been conquered is "the universe".

I'll leave the Slovak form of it to you!

John Grimm
Amarr
Rendili StarDrive Yards
Posted - 2008.06.20 10:44:00 - [285]
 

Can i, pls, ask you if you can translate this in Latin:

"Steel and Iron guard me well!
Or else i'm dead and doomed to hell!"

Tnks.Very Happy

F'nog
Amarr
Viziam
Posted - 2008.06.20 11:18:00 - [286]
 

A bit of a side track:

Lost: Via Domus

It's a game based on the show. Obviously it means The Way Home, but it can't possibly be grammatically correct, can it?

Thoughts?

Nofonno
Amarr
Posted - 2008.06.20 12:43:00 - [287]
 

Originally by: jna

Sure thing!

Vi is the Ablative Singular of the 3rd declension feminine noun vis, vis meaning "strength, force or power". Being Ablative, this gets the sense of "By, with or from", so makes "By the power".

veri is the Genitive Singular of the 2nd declension neuter noun verum, veri meaning "truth, reality or fact". Being Genitive, this gets the sense of "of truth".

Here it must be noted that the sentence does not contain a stated Nominative noun, so it is assumed that the Nominative subject comes from the verb below ("I")

vivus is the Nominitive Singular adjective of vivus, viva, vivum meaning "alive, fresh or living". Being nominative it must be applied to the "I", so "alive" or "whilst living"

vici is the 1st person Perfect Active Indicative of the 3rd declension verb vinco, vincere, vici, victus meaning "conquer, defeat or outlast". Being in the case noted earlier, this gets the sense of "I have conquered".

universum is the Accusative Singular of the 2nd declension Masculine noun Universus, universi meaning "universe". It should be noted, however, that this isn't a very common word for "universe", which is much more usually "universitas". Being Accusative, this becomes the object of the sentence, the thing that has been conquered is "the universe".

I'll leave the Slovak form of it to you!



Now I'm buggered, since there's no 1 to 1 relation for ablative case in Slovak. Do you think it would be possible to go with instrumental case here (which we do have)?

Ethidium Bromide
Amarr
ZEALOT WARRIORS AGAINST TERRORISTS
Curatores Veritatis Alliance
Posted - 2008.06.20 13:48:00 - [288]
 

i have to admit that after reading up, i enjoy this thread more and more!
although i abhorred latin at school i caught myself with my latin dictionary reading over this thread:)

so to follow the latest fashion i will present some of my favorite latin
Amantes amentes.
Bella gerant alii ! Tu, felix Austria, nube ! Nam quae Mars aliis, dat tibi regna Venus.
Cura fugit multo diluiturque mero.
and a last one for the matariRazz you can use it either way
Iniqua numquam regna perpetuo manent.

Sir Question
Federal Navy Academy
Posted - 2008.06.20 15:47:00 - [289]
 

Originally by: Waagaa Ktlehr
English has a pretty big history of maiming words from ancient languages and give it their own spin.


You don't have to look too far away from England to see this. In the 19th century the Ordinance Survey mapped Ireland. Most of the country (pre-famine) spoke Irish so the surveyors put down names on the map using the roman alphabet as it is used in English. Hence Baile became Bally, etc. It causes no end of confusion to tourists even now as they try to descipher the signposts :)

Needless to say this was quite a political guesture at the time. How many Europeans know the capital of Ireland is Baile atha Cliath (Town at the Ford). I would say most have heard of Dubh Linn (Dark Pool) or as written using the English way of pronouncing the roman alphabet - Dublin.

Best thread on the boards in a long time!

jna
Caldari
Infinite Improbability Inc
-Mostly Harmless-
Posted - 2008.06.20 17:27:00 - [290]
 

Originally by: John Grimm
Can i, pls, ask you if you can translate this in Latin:

"Steel and Iron guard me well!
Or else i'm dead and doomed to hell!"

Tnks.Very Happy


I tried to make it scan, sort-of...

Ferrum Chalybsque bene me custodite,
Aut peribo et ad infernum damnabor.


Originally by: F'nog
A bit of a side track:

Lost: Via Domus

It's a game based on the show. Obviously it means The Way Home, but it can't possibly be grammatically correct, can it?

Thoughts?

Well, I don't think it's right. In Latin, every use of "via" in terms of a "way or route" takes a (feminine to agree with via) adjective, regardless of whether the actual root of the adjective is masc, fem or neut - eg via praetoriaor via militaris.

And where adjectival forms of words they wanted to use with "via" didn't exist, the Romans created them specifically for the purpose.

So, Augustus', Trajan's and Appius' roads were all, respectively, Via Augusta, Via Traiana and Via Appia. So the "Home Way", "Home Route", "Route Home" or "Way Home" would probably be Via Doma. I wouldn't swear by it though...


Originally by: Nofonno
Now I'm buggered, since there's no 1 to 1 relation for ablative case in Slovak. Do you think it would be possible to go with instrumental case here (which we do have)?


Yes, absolutely fine. The Ablative is the Instrumental Case in Latin.

Siigari Kitawa
Gallente
Perditus Peregrinus
Posted - 2008.06.20 17:36:00 - [291]
 

jna how would I name my corp The Aduro Protocol in Latin?

jna
Caldari
Infinite Improbability Inc
-Mostly Harmless-
Posted - 2008.06.20 18:02:00 - [292]
 

Originally by: Siigari Kitawa
jna how would I name my corp The Aduro Protocol in Latin?

Heyya Siigari,

There isn't a direct Latin translation (that I can find) for "protocol", but there are two words that are very close in meaning:

mos, moris, meaning "custom, habit; mood, manner, fashion; character (pl.), behavior, morals"

or, alternatively:

consuetudo, consuetudinis meaning "habit/custom/usage/way; normal/general/customary practice, tradition/convention;"

So "The Aduro Protocol" would be either Mos Aduris or Consuetudo Aduris.

Jane Bennet
Caldari
Alloyed Tritanium Bar And Grill
Posted - 2008.06.20 18:08:00 - [293]
 

Best. Thread. Ever.

I used to have an alt, Decorus Nex, and she used to have a hauler alt, Turpis Vita.

I know, I know, no gold star for me, I was basically just mashing together words from a Latin dictionary.

But now for the REAL question: When can we expect the EVE client Latin localized version?

What's "Your 'Arbalest' Rocket Launcher perfectly hits XXX, wrecking for 40 points of damage." in Latin, anyway?

jna
Caldari
Infinite Improbability Inc
-Mostly Harmless-
Posted - 2008.06.20 18:23:00 - [294]
 

Originally by: Eddie Knight
Edit: now that I think of it, I guess Enigmatic Empire would be something like Imperium Enigmae, Imperium Enigmatis or Imperium Aenigmaticus. Got the last one from here.

Missed this one ^^

Either Imperium Enigmatium - Nom Singular followed by Genitive Plural
or Imperium Enigmaticum - Nom Singular followed by Nominative Neuter Adjective.

On both words, you can spell the first "E" of "enigma" as "Ae" if you prefer.

They have very slightly different meanings/emphasis though. The former means "Empire of Enigmas", the latter means "Enigmatic Empire".

Siigari Kitawa
Gallente
Perditus Peregrinus
Posted - 2008.06.20 18:51:00 - [295]
 

Originally by: jna
Originally by: Siigari Kitawa
jna how would I name my corp The Aduro Protocol in Latin?

Heyya Siigari,

There isn't a direct Latin translation (that I can find) for "protocol", but there are two words that are very close in meaning:

mos, moris, meaning "custom, habit; mood, manner, fashion; character (pl.), behavior, morals"

or, alternatively:

consuetudo, consuetudinis meaning "habit/custom/usage/way; normal/general/customary practice, tradition/convention;"

So "The Aduro Protocol" would be either Mos Aduris or Consuetudo Aduris.

Ah, thanks. I noticed this when I was looking around for a name, I wanted something that simply meant "The Burn Initiative" but I hate how the word Initiative is passed around EVE like a cheap hooker.

So I thought Protocol was cool :D I didn't realize there was no direct translation until looking for probably a good three hours at various websites and going through various translators (all which translated Protocol as Protocol) so I was sad.

But, The Aduro Protocol has a nice ring to it, don't you think? :)

Travis050
Everset Dropbears
Fidelas Constans
Posted - 2008.06.20 19:09:00 - [296]
 

Hi jna,

Just finished 1st year Latin, and have to take second year next year also.

Thanks for pointing out the Latin mistakes, the Latin language is not something that should be butchered apart!Wink

jna
Caldari
Infinite Improbability Inc
-Mostly Harmless-
Posted - 2008.06.20 19:13:00 - [297]
 

Edited by: jna on 20/06/2008 19:19:40
Originally by: Jane Bennet
What's "Your 'Arbalest' Rocket Launcher perfectly hits XXX, wrecking for 40 points of damage." in Latin, anyway?

I was initially very surprised to find a Latin word for "rocket" in the dictionary, but assumed that maybe the Vatican had stuck it in there in recent times. But looking more closely at rucheta, ruchetae, I realised that "Your deliciously peppery 'Arbalest' leaf salad strikes... " wouldn't have quite the same impact. Laughing

So "exploding device" was about the best I could do.

Tuum 'Arbalest' explosivum commentum XXX percutiat, calamitati quadrageni numerorum se confringat.

EDIT: And can I just say that "Alloyed Tritanium Bar And Grill" is perhaps the best corp name I have ever come across Cool

Lady Boraaj
Posted - 2008.06.22 23:01:00 - [298]
 

Originally by: jna
Originally by: Nofonno

Shocked

My hat is off to you, kind sir. Is linguistics something you do professionally?


No, not really, but it's my background. Latin for 12 years Shocked, then I passed up a place at university to read ASNAC (Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic) to read Arabic instead. Etymology and linguistics is a pet subject of mine, and yes, I'm a nerd, it's true.


Jeezus tbh. Yes, linguistic is at the least semi-pro Shocked

Nofonno
Amarr
Posted - 2008.06.23 12:14:00 - [299]
 

Originally by: jna

Sure thing!

Vi is the Ablative Singular of the 3rd declension feminine noun vis, vis meaning "strength, force or power". Being Ablative, this gets the sense of "By, with or from", so makes "By the power".

veri is the Genitive Singular of the 2nd declension neuter noun verum, veri meaning "truth, reality or fact". Being Genitive, this gets the sense of "of truth".

Here it must be noted that the sentence does not contain a stated Nominative noun, so it is assumed that the Nominative subject comes from the verb below ("I")

vivus is the Nominitive Singular adjective of vivus, viva, vivum meaning "alive, fresh or living". Being nominative it must be applied to the "I", so "alive" or "whilst living"

vici is the 1st person Perfect Active Indicative of the 3rd declension verb vinco, vincere, vici, victus meaning "conquer, defeat or outlast". Being in the case noted earlier, this gets the sense of "I have conquered".

universum is the Accusative Singular of the 2nd declension Masculine noun Universus, universi meaning "universe". It should be noted, however, that this isn't a very common word for "universe", which is much more usually "universitas". Being Accusative, this becomes the object of the sentence, the thing that has been conquered is "the universe".

I'll leave the Slovak form of it to you!



First, I couldn't do it in five words only, since the Perfect Active Indicative is unfortunately ambiguous in Slovak (1st person sg. and 3rd person sg. are the same) and I have to use a reflexive pronoun ("som").

For your lexical pleasure Wink

vi    veri   vivus vici      universum
silou pravdy živý, dobyl som vesmír


Drykor
Minmatar
Aperture Harmonics
K162
Posted - 2008.06.23 12:22:00 - [300]
 

Originally by: TheBlueMonkey
Excelent post,

This really makes me want to start a corporation for the distinguished gentleman of eve.
One where we fight with valor, finesse and moxie.

One where the "smack talk" consists of phrases such as "thou art a braggart and a cad".
Oh such a marvelous dream.




There is one already ^^


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