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zwerg
Macabre Votum
Imperial Republic Of the North
Posted - 2007.07.05 17:05:00 - [31]
 

Originally by: R'olyat
Edited by: R''olyat on 05/07/2007 16:00:25
Originally by: James Swindle
I've had my dog since he was a puppy, and I have never kept him in a cage. Why on earth do you need to keep the dog in a cage anyway???


To keep him from taking a dump on the floor when you're not watching, or maybe tearing something up.

Some puppies are VERY mischievous and have to be kept in a cage when the owner is busy until they have been trained not to do such things.


when i got my dog ( 1month puppuy ) i played with him 24/7 for like 3 month, went out with him and taught him how to be nice ( toilet, wuff wuff etc. ) and after this time he got a really nice one without any problems for me.

of course this doesnt work if you get the puppy and get it into a cage asap ( if its only 5 moinutes a day )

Ixianus
Posted - 2007.07.05 17:16:00 - [32]
 

Edited by: Ixianus on 05/07/2007 17:16:17
You shouldnt leave your dog in a cage alone... For extended periods anyway. A couple of hours a day at most "locked" in a kennel. Your dog should like its resting place, like a dog bed. And should return to it on its own to sleep and the like. Finley is correct though.
If youre indeed training the dog to be in the car with you, Id imagine its not going to be "alone" as youre going to be within some feet of it, misleading indeed.
Whenever we need to contain a dog, we just put it in a small pin, which you can buy the supplies for most anywhere. Additionally, Ive driven with "Minnie," the family weiner dog many a time, I just let her sleep on the back seat, or if I dont have anything in the passenger seat, in the front seat.

Caging dogs for long periods, as you implied in your first post, isnt something that should be done, makes the dog unhappy. And as other have said, if you dont want to interact with the dog, and its just going to be a drain on your income, then give it away. Get a dog if you want to play with it and such.

Yeah, Ive seen a fellow take care of his dog by kicking the cage down the stairs, with the dog in it, then hosing out the poo thats been accumulating for who knows how long. Perhaps if you posted originally without sounding like an animal abuser people wouldnt have assumed you were.

Crumplecorn
Gallente
Eve Cluster Explorations
Posted - 2007.07.05 19:03:00 - [33]
 

That's some badly behaved dogs you people have.

Stick it in a cage because it'll tear the place up? You fail at dog ownership.

I mean, wow.

Krulla
Minmatar
Miner Protection Guild
Posted - 2007.07.05 19:20:00 - [34]
 

Edited by: Krulla on 05/07/2007 19:27:41
Originally by: mamolian
Nothing unusual about keeping a dog in a cage?

Where the **** do you people come from..


Um, it's pretty standard just about everywhere.

If you want a dog to become used to sleeping in his cage (Note; Most dog cages are actually quite roomy and also padded, and have a water, sometimes food dispenser, so it's not exactly inhumane treatment), or used to staying in it while traveling, you keep the puppy in there for the first few weeks while he's sleeping (or in the evening, when he should be sleeping). It's very very common and not inhumane at all. Neutral

Also, for travel, putting dogs in cages is both pratcical for you, the owner, and safer for the dog if you get into a car crash.

I have a 9 year old dog (collie/labrador crossbreed), and we kept him in his cage while sleeping and during the evenings for about a month when he was a puppy. Today, the cage is his "home" (much like a human's bedroom, if you will) and he sleeps there almost exclusively, with the door open. We had to move it for two days when we were putting a new floor in, and he started whining. He eventually found it, and tried to drag it back where it was. He looked so damn satisfied and happy when he finally managed to drag it back to where it was, and go to sleep in it. Laughing

Death Kill
Caldari
SolaR KillerS
UN1CUM
Posted - 2007.07.05 20:41:00 - [35]
 

I think the anti cage peope are kids who dont hold jobs.

Miss Anthropy
Perkone
Posted - 2007.07.05 20:47:00 - [36]
 

Edited by: Miss Anthropy on 05/07/2007 20:58:30
Originally by: Death Kill
I think the anti cage peope are kids who dont hold jobs.


I'm 30 and have been in the same job for 4 or 5 years (it's been so long I've forgotten). You're wrong and you now have to eat your own words.

EDIT: You really should have reworded your OP like the others have said. You wouldn't have been judged so harshly at first if you'd done so. You made yourself sound like a lazy gamer who was lumbered with a dog he didn't want.

From my experience with my mum's puppy (now dog), they really don't like being on their own. Cats yes; you can leave them alone for hours and not even know they're in the same house as you. But dogs like to know you're there all the time. I'm not sure they can be trained to stay in a cage for a while without getting distressed. Whenever we've tried to leave my mum's dog in a room on its own it's barked incessantly without ever getting bored or annoyed with its own noise. This is why I would rather have a cat (although cats are a pain to organise for if you're going on holiday).

Krulla
Minmatar
Miner Protection Guild
Posted - 2007.07.05 20:56:00 - [37]
 

Originally by: Miss Anthropy
Originally by: Death Kill
I think the anti cage peope are kids who dont hold jobs.


I'm 30 and have been in the same job for 4 or 5 years (it's been so long I've forgotten). You're wrong and you now have to eat your own words.


You're wrong. It's just because people see "cage" and "animal" in the same sentance and freak out.

Raising a dog is exactly like raising a child. If you spoil it, it will not behave, and be, well, a bad dog. You need to be a bit harsh to them. Not physically harsh, I would never hit any dog, but discipline is needed.

Travis050
Everset Dropbears
Fidelas Constans
Posted - 2007.07.05 21:09:00 - [38]
 

get a cat!

Shalia Ripper
Caldari
The Elevens
Posted - 2007.07.05 21:28:00 - [39]
 

My dog (a 75 pound American Pit Bull Terrier) sleeps and spends the day when I am not at home in his "house", a large dog crate. He almost never spends any time in there when I am home (usually sleeping on the couch or in the back yard barking at everyone that walks by.

I started him early on the crate by having him in one during the day. He used to never sleep in it at night, but once he got big enough to take up too much of the bed, he no longer got to sleep on the bed with me. The crate has NEVER been a "discipline" tool. He has no problem going in there. He also gets attention when he is out of his crate, which is critical so as to not develop abandonment issues, which can cause behavioral problems.

Oh, and he eats every pad I put in there....so now it is unpadded. I get tired of cleaning up the mess.


Micheal Dietrich
Caldari
Caldari Provisions
Posted - 2007.07.05 21:35:00 - [40]
 

Originally by: Krulla
Originally by: Miss Anthropy
Originally by: Death Kill
I think the anti cage peope are kids who dont hold jobs.


I'm 30 and have been in the same job for 4 or 5 years (it's been so long I've forgotten). You're wrong and you now have to eat your own words.


You're wrong. It's just because people see "cage" and "animal" in the same sentance and freak out.

Raising a dog is exactly like raising a child. If you spoil it, it will not behave, and be, well, a bad dog. You need to be a bit harsh to them. Not physically harsh, I would never hit any dog, but discipline is needed.



May want to use another word other than harsh. I spoil my dog all the time and yet he still understands the rules. He doesn't get into the trash, I can leave him unattended for up to 10 hours without him using the floor as a bathroom. He'll return if I call him. In return he gets to lay on the couch and he even gets a spot on the bed. He's allowed near the dinner table as long as he doesn't beg.
It's all a matter of making sure they know who's boss.

SubTig
Posted - 2007.07.05 22:05:00 - [41]
 


This isn't as cruel as it sounds. I have used this method to train my German Shepard. It was used to get her used to being alone for long periods. She was kept in the cage over night.

The first night was awful. I didn't sleep a wink because of the noise. But you can't go down and comfort it because it then learns making that noise gets you to respond.

All in all it should only take a couple of nights. House training is really easy and should only take 1-2 weeks, I was lucky, German shepards are very intelligent dogs and mine has very good breeding making my life easy!!!!

Subtig

Death Kill
Caldari
SolaR KillerS
UN1CUM
Posted - 2007.07.05 22:19:00 - [42]
 

Edited by: Death Kill on 05/07/2007 22:19:01
Originally by: Miss Anthropy

EDIT: You really should have reworded your OP like the others have said. You wouldn't have been judged so harshly at first if you'd done so.


I assumed people here had the mental capacity to piece two and two together. Krulla and GM Zhainius managed to figure it out, unlike the rest of the wuaaaambulance squad.

And, I have a Doberman and they are to receive strict training on account of not being lapdogs.

Crumplecorn
Gallente
Eve Cluster Explorations
Posted - 2007.07.05 22:52:00 - [43]
 

Originally by: Death Kill
Edited by: Death Kill on 05/07/2007 22:19:01
Originally by: Miss Anthropy

EDIT: You really should have reworded your OP like the others have said. You wouldn't have been judged so harshly at first if you'd done so.


I assumed people here had the mental capacity to piece two and two together. Krulla and GM Zhainius managed to figure it out, unlike the rest of the wuaaaambulance squad.

And, I have a Doberman and they are to receive strict training on account of not being lapdogs.
Yes, everyone's first assumption on hearing that someone has locked a puppy in a cage and are trying to drown out the whining should be that it is being done with good reason.

Because stories of animals being mistreated, you never hear them... Rolling Eyes

Patch86
Di-Tron Heavy Industries
Atlas Alliance
Posted - 2007.07.05 23:10:00 - [44]
 

Edited by: Patch86 on 05/07/2007 23:11:08
Originally by: Death Kill
Edited by: Death Kill on 05/07/2007 22:19:01
Originally by: Miss Anthropy

EDIT: You really should have reworded your OP like the others have said. You wouldn't have been judged so harshly at first if you'd done so.


I assumed people here had the mental capacity to piece two and two together. Krulla and GM Zhainius managed to figure it out, unlike the rest of the wuaaaambulance squad.

And, I have a Doberman and they are to receive strict training on account of not being lapdogs.


All your OP says is "How do you leave a dog in a cage alone, mine is making so much noise I can't play my game". Sorry if people interpreted that as...well, how do I leave my dog in a cage alone without it whining.

I owned a doberman (dead now, bless it). It wasn't anymore difficult to train than any other dog I've been involved with. You've just got to keep on top of the negative reinforcement, since they can be a bit...chewy. You know, dog whistle or shaker or spray gun or whatever you want to use.

Don't really know about travel cages, since I've never used one. With a dog the size of a doberman, unless you're planning of flying it places it's easier just to travel with it on a leash.


EDIT: Doberman cross actually, come to mention it. Could never be arsed with the whole pedigree thing. Can't remember what it was crossed with now though...possibly some sort of collie.

Tarquin Tarquinius
Gallente
Escorts of Eve
Posted - 2007.07.05 23:41:00 - [45]
 

My dog never got used to the cage. He would whine until he fell asleep, then he'd whine some more when he woke up.

He still can't stand being alone. Whether I lock him in my room or if I go outside and leave him with the entire house to himself, he still whines and barks.

Derovius Vaden
Posted - 2007.07.06 01:12:00 - [46]
 


If you're going to train it, train it properly; be firm, but not abusive. Reward, but don't gush over it. Always keep in mind what a pack of wild dogs would do. You want them to understand that you're the "alpha" of your "pack", and that the position is not up for grabs. For example:

- When you give them a toy or treat, give them 5 minutes to play/chew on it, then come back and make a slow movement to pick up the item. If the dog snarls or growls at you, take away the item and scold it. If he/she lets you pick it up without any fuss, praise it/give it some rubs and return the toy.

- When you give them a treat, make them sit and wait for atleast a minute before you offer it. Never let your dog get so excited that it accidentally bites you, because it may just smart when they nip your fingers, but they can really hurt childern or other pets if they think aggression is acceptable.

- Tone is everything; when you're mad, sound mad. When you're pleased with them, sound happy. I find that our dogs respond better to me and my father, as our voices are deep and commanding, where it takes my sister or mother several repeats of the same command to get the dogs to do the same.

laotse
Gallente
shangdi
Posted - 2007.07.06 01:21:00 - [47]
 

i have 2Shocked dog,s and i work all day if you teach them you can go 8 hours and dont have to put your dog in to a cage if you work longer then that please dont take a dog because you dont have the time for them imo! i like you to see when you need a pis and have to wait in a cage for to many hours? so make some wise disesoins next time


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