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blankseplocked 1 au = 149 598 000 km, but in EVE ?
 
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Marcsen
Black Sheeps
Posted - 2005.08.11 20:06:00 - [1]
 

Hi,
while doing experiments with scan probes today,
i wondered if EVE used this number as well,
or if its rounded in game?

If anyone knows the exact figure, please let me know :)

Thanks, Marcsen

Edge1
Caldari
Posted - 2005.08.11 20:09:00 - [2]
 

I think it is that figure.

When I set my scanner to 150 million km, I can reach up to 1AU.

Though ive not tested it exactly, it is certainly around that figure.

Jessa
Caldari
Zion Corp
Posted - 2005.08.11 20:19:00 - [3]
 

yeah one eve au is the same as one standard au.

Allen Deckard
Gallente
Roadking Hawg's
Posted - 2005.08.11 20:28:00 - [4]
 

always wondered what the hell an au was.

Trepkos
The Royal Syndicate
Posted - 2005.08.11 20:32:00 - [5]
 

distance between earth and the sun right?

O'knar
Grettistak
Posted - 2005.08.11 20:36:00 - [6]
 

Yes

The Slayer
Caldari
GoonWaffe
Posted - 2005.08.11 20:37:00 - [7]
 

Definition: An Astronomical Unit is approximately the mean distance between the Earth and the Sun

Dionysus Davinci
The Scope
Posted - 2005.08.11 20:51:00 - [8]
 

I believe in MiscData dump. The Excel Spreadsheet gives all the EO units of messaure and what they are, etc. I think Mole is in there as well >:p

Allen Deckard
Gallente
Roadking Hawg's
Posted - 2005.08.11 21:11:00 - [9]
 

Originally by: Dionysus Davinci
I believe in MiscData dump. The Excel Spreadsheet gives all the EO units of messaure and what they are, etc. I think Mole is in there as well >:p


Let me clarify. It's one of those things that I wondered about but didn't wonder enough to actually look it up. Smile

Baldour Ngarr
Black Thorne Corporation
Black Thorne Alliance
Posted - 2005.08.12 00:08:00 - [10]
 

For those of you who'd like to increase your collection of pointless trivia:

Light takes approx. eight minutes to travel the 1AU from the Sun to the Earth. Ergo, the speed of light is 1AU per eight minutes.

I gather certain ships can achieve 13.5AU/sec while in warp. That's equivalent to 810AU a minute, or 6,480 times the speed of light.

Amataras
Minmatar
The Legion of Spoon
Curatores Veritatis Alliance
Posted - 2005.08.12 00:36:00 - [11]
 

Originally by: Baldour Ngarr

I gather certain ships can achieve 13.5AU/sec while in warp. That's equivalent to 810AU a minute, or 6,480 times the speed of light.


And if my calculations are correct (I make no promises here Razz), it would take a ship travelling at 13.5AU/sec five hours to reach our nearest star (alpha centauri) from Earth Cool

Grimpak
Gallente
Midnight Elites
Echelon Rising
Posted - 2005.08.12 00:59:00 - [12]
 

Originally by: Amataras
Originally by: Baldour Ngarr

I gather certain ships can achieve 13.5AU/sec while in warp. That's equivalent to 810AU a minute, or 6,480 times the speed of light.


And if my calculations are correct (I make no promises here Razz), it would take a ship travelling at 13.5AU/sec five hours to reach our nearest star (alpha centauri) from Earth Cool


hiperspace ftw \o/Cool

slapp
Cryo Innovations
Fatal Ascension
Posted - 2005.08.12 01:00:00 - [13]
 

warp bubble bends the space, making the "route" shorter

Nekuva
The SMITE Brotherhood
Posted - 2005.08.12 03:15:00 - [14]
 

Why aren't jumpgates obselete? if ships can travel to other systems in a matter of hours, why go through with the trouble of sending construction teams to build a frikkin massive jumpgate in a far off system, then spend weeks trying and hoping to open a wormhole to the first jumpgate when vessels can just fly straight out there without any extra effort? it doesn't make sense to me

Kaell Meynn
Divergence
Posted - 2005.08.12 03:30:00 - [15]
 

5 hours > 3 seconds. Thus, jumpgates. If you want to spend 5 hours traveling to each system (and thats only for the ones that are really really close to eachother, others being some dozens of hours), while I spend 3 seconds per jump, then feel free. I'll stick to they jumpgates thanks. :)

Plekto
Freedom United Consolidations - Inter Terrestrial
United For 0rder
Posted - 2005.08.12 04:03:00 - [16]
 

But there should still be the option to slog through it the old fashioned way. Also, many stars, especially nearer the center of a galaxy, are sometimes within a LY or less of each other.

Maybe a new module to increase warp speed - that way you could go 20-50AU a second and in theory, get to the next system in an hour or two.

S31Apocalypse
Gallente
Aliastra
Posted - 2005.08.12 04:24:00 - [17]
 

would gravity effect light over vast distances, meaning something in space billions of AU's away, mite not be straight where you are looking.. like a fish in a pond is alway off to the side depending on witch way the light is coming..

gravity being the medium instead of water.. blackholes, stars & such??

just a question for you nerds Cool

Hllaxiu
Shiva
Morsus Mihi
Posted - 2005.08.12 04:28:00 - [18]
 

Originally by: S31Apocalypse
would gravity effect light over vast distances, meaning something in space billions of AU's away, mite not be straight where you are looking.. like a fish in a pond is alway off to the side depending on witch way the light is coming..

gravity being the medium instead of water.. blackholes, stars & such??

just a question for you nerds Cool


IN SHORT, it doesn't work like that and the exception is blackholes.

S31Apocalypse
Gallente
Aliastra
Posted - 2005.08.12 04:34:00 - [19]
 

dont know if you dont ask Wink i did watch a show on blackholes freeky

Dark Shikari
Caldari
Deep Core Mining Inc.
Posted - 2005.08.12 04:38:00 - [20]
 

Edited by: Dark Shikari on 12/08/2005 04:44:18
Originally by: S31Apocalypse
dont know if you dont ask Wink i did watch a show on blackholes freeky

Gravity does affect light over long distances--the only question is by how much. Black holes affect it the most, but often large galaxies can even produce mirror images of galaxies behind them. Look up gravitational lensing.

S31Apocalypse
Gallente
Aliastra
Posted - 2005.08.12 04:43:00 - [21]
 

why did my comment get such a ****head response from you, I frak your girl in another life or something?

what i dont know about blackholes is prob about = to what you dont know about manners..

rude much

Dark Shikari
Caldari
Deep Core Mining Inc.
Posted - 2005.08.12 04:44:00 - [22]
 

Originally by: S31Apocalypse
why did my comment get such a ****head response from you, I frak your girl in another life or something?

what i dont know about blackholes is prob about = to what you dont know about manners..

rude much


I thought you implied by your comment "I know tons about black holes cuz I watched a TV show!"

I don't think I was that rude though, I even answered your question.

Vivus Mors
Posted - 2005.08.12 13:46:00 - [23]
 

Also, it is important to note that “Black holes” aren’t holes at all.

A black hole is a star, or was rather, and instead of going super nova when it reaches super-dense proportions, it collapses in on itself because its own gravity is so intense and focused on a single point that it prevents itself from exploding. What results is a “singularity”, where so much matter is crushed into the volume of little more than a matter of atom widths in any direction, but because there is so much in such a small area the gravitational force is tremendous by having so much in such a small point.

What happens as a result of this is that anything known to man, be it matter or energy, can be effected by its drawing force and either slightly warping light around its curvature for instance, or if it’s within the effect of the event horizon it is literally negated by the larger amount of force.

Think of it in that case like jamming a radio signal, between the emission and the receiver, the singularity exerts so much disruptive force as to either “effect” the signal or completely disrupting it if the signal crosses the area of strong enough effect.

Contrary to common belief, a black hole is no some “void of nothingness from which there is no return”; the singularity acts much like any other star, just much stronger as it’s many times more dense than most so it would act much like an impossibly large star. If one was to stay far enough away, the effects of the singularity would be negligible and fear of being drawn in is minimal.

If something is caught in orbit around such a body (as many astronomers believe there is evidence that singularities are quite possible if not already present in the centers of some galaxies like our own) then if the distance far enough, it can actually maintain a non-eccentric orbit so long as the singularity doesn’t begin exerting more force by getting more dense after drawing in other celestial bodies.

If however a body is coming too close to the singularity and it can not maintain a non-eccentric orbit, one of two possibilities could result much like such a body coming too close to any other star. One, it could/would be drawn in if the body is entirely too close, almost a collision course, with the star/singularity. Two, if the body is traveling at tremendous speed and somewhat “grazing” the interior of the event horizon in its crossed path with the singularity/star, then the object crossing paths may well exceed its Roche limit and be partially or completely torn apart from the force of it’s own inertia trying to force it forward and the gravity pulling against it. The remaining rubble would almost certainly be drawn in, and only the smallest/fastest remnants of the object would likely escape on that orbit, if however they returned in a later orbit the remaining bits would likely succumb to the singularity then.

Shamis Orzoz
Sniggerdly
Pandemic Legion
Posted - 2005.08.12 14:08:00 - [24]
 

Eve definitely uses that number, almost exactly. There was probably some rounding somewhere, but its close enough that nobody will notice.

Marcsen
Black Sheeps
Posted - 2005.08.12 21:18:00 - [25]
 

Edited by: Marcsen on 12/08/2005 21:18:24
Originally by: Shamis Orzoz
Eve definitely uses that number, almost exactly. There was probably some rounding somewhere, but its close enough that nobody will notice.


Thanks, good answer Very Happy

Sveldt
Posted - 2005.08.12 22:27:00 - [26]
 

I much preferred Vivus' answer Cool

Sveldt
Posted - 2005.08.12 22:27:00 - [27]
 

Edited by: Sveldt on 12/08/2005 22:27:37
damned dbl post

Ekscalybur
Caldari
Federal Defence Union
Posted - 2005.08.13 03:26:00 - [28]
 

Originally by: S31Apocalypse
would gravity effect light over vast distances, meaning something in space billions of AU's away, mite not be straight where you are looking.. like a fish in a pond is alway off to the side depending on witch way the light is coming..

gravity being the medium instead of water.. blackholes, stars & such??

just a question for you nerds Cool


Nope, it wouldn't be straight where you are looking, because the light of that start took billions of 8 minute blocks to reach you, by the time you see it, its light years away from the spot it was when it sent the light to you.

Let's not even get into time dilation.

Krapz
Sloppy Seconds
Posted - 2005.08.13 05:09:00 - [29]
 

Originally by: Jessa
yeah one eve au is the same as one standard au.


I'm still hoping for the day that 1 of my Eve isk equaled 1 standard isk.

Calian
Caldari
The Makaze Blade
Posted - 2005.08.13 07:11:00 - [30]
 

Edited by: Calian on 13/08/2005 07:15:05
You really have to ask if the game rounds the AU calculation when it calculates everything out to freaking like 30 decimal places? Haven't you looked at your standing in the recycling window? "We hold you in a standing of 4.234235235235236236235234" and then if you look at the actual data on this website for your character, you'll see it shows your total isk as like 4,556,342.2342 as if you ever need to really know your isk out to the millionth of 1 isk.

Black holes incidently are holes, because singularities are so dense they actualy tear through time and space causing a hole in the fabric of the universe.


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