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Eojek
Amarr
Starlight Molly
Posted - 2011.08.28 04:55:00 - [91]
 

Home:

I'm going to post something here that is a good descriptor, and coinsides on what I would want in a remote space-cabin in the howling wild.

From: http://sheltersa.wordpress.com/

"Hi, I’m Cate, a Project Officer for Shelter SA in Adelaide, South Australia. Shelter SA is an organisation that believes that housing is a basic human right. We promote and campaign for affordable housing, public housing and for those who are homeless.
I’m initiating a project that explores the idea of ‘home’ and what ‘home’ represents to a broad range of individuals. I’m interested in gathering a vast collection of people’s ideas about ‘the meaning of home’. I would like to explore what ‘home’ represents for individuals including as many culturally diverse people as possible from all over the world.

If the idea of ‘home’ represents security and safety for most people, its opposite is homelessness. But, homelessness signifies much more than simply being without physical refuge. How can we really explore the impact of homelessness unless we understand what home represents to us?

I’m asking the question: what is ‘home? What do you think creates the feeling of ‘home’? Is ‘home’ the place you live, or is ‘home’ another place connected to your history, heritage, friends, family or country?

“Our literal home is a “sacred,” mythic place, even for non-religious people. We all believe in a special space beyond our own doorsills that simply cannot be violated. This is my place, where I can close the door on chaos and find some kind of cosmos, peace, assurance of purpose. “This is mine; here I belong.” (unknown source)

The meaning of ‘home’ is not an easy concept to isolate. It seems to encompass a broad sphere of emotional experience, sensory perception, memory and feelings of nostalgia. For many Australian Aboriginal people it relates, very directly to Lands they feel displaced from living in the city, or traditional Lands represent places where they experience safety and wholeness.

While the term ‘home’ is immediately identifiable, and the physical reality of home is a central characteristic of our everyday lives, our perceptions of what home truly means to us, do not get very much attention. Home, seems something most of us take for granted. But, the most elemental embodiment of life is ‘home’.

Home constitutes, for almost all of us, simple rituals that link us with sequences of the day and patterns of time. The rituals that surround, gathering food, cooking for ourselves or our families, washing, eating, sleeping and cleaning connect us to almost all of humanity yet we do very little to celebrate or pay tribute to those rituals that centre around, and link us to the diverse but collective experience, of ‘home’.

Humans, throughout history, have constructed a myriad of methods to evoke ‘home’. The concerns of modern first world societies are not fundamentally that dissimilar to the struggles of very early humankind. We still seek the basics for survival, such as, food, clothing and shelter, perhaps more sophisticated and complicated versions, but the basics nevertheless. But because humans seek and need shelter, the homes we have, and continue to inhabit, create and recreate layer after layer of cultural meaning.

The meaning of home, of a protected refuge, is very often connected with comfort, relationships, family, relatives, friends and the traditional rituals that give meaning to our lives. This is borne out by the trauma people experience after a break-in or the loss of home through a natural disaster or a relationship split up. But home is also related to memory, a wish to honour the past and communicate to others our identities through the spirit of our homes.

To start the project I emailed as many contacts across Australia as I possibly could. Below is the message I sent out and the posts are the messages I received back. If you would like to add anything more please share your thoughts with all of us!!!!!
....

Eojek
Amarr
Starlight Molly
Posted - 2011.08.28 05:04:00 - [92]
 

continued....

What is Home

I am initiating a small project that explores the idea of ‘home’ and what ‘home’ represents to a broad range of individuals. I’m interested in gathering a big collection of people’s ideas about ‘the meaning of home’. I would like to explore what ‘home’ represents for individuals including as many culturally diverse people as possible. I’m asking the question: what is ‘home? What do you think creates the feeling of ‘home’? Is ‘home’ the place you live, or is ‘home’ another place connected to your history, heritage, friends, family or country? Is ‘home’ defined by an internal response to place or by external circumstances?

If the idea of ‘home’ represents security and safety for most people, its opposite is homelessness. But, homelessness signifies much more than simply being without physical or emotional refuge. How can we really explore the impact of homelessness unless we understand what home represents to us?

___________________

For me, it's a refuge which with reasonable levels of care, I can keep from being violated. A place where I can withdraw to in times of danger. I would also like to be able to move said home if it is discovered.

Eojek
Amarr
Starlight Molly
Posted - 2011.08.28 05:09:00 - [93]
 

Ultima Online tried player homes with disastrous results. While it made people stick around, it resulted in blight.

To quote a passage from Wikipedia.

Housing

Ultima Online has always allowed players to purchase houses and build them on flat pieces of land. For the first few months, the primary issues with housing were that losing the key meant losing the house (often to another player who stole it or killed the owner), and if someone managed to get inside the house (either by exploitation of a bug or by simply waiting until someone opened/unlocked the door), they could steal everything inside. These issues were later addressed by making house keys “blessed” (non-stealable, non-droppable upon death) items, and by giving special commands to “lock down” items, so that even those who got in the house could not pick them up. Ownership of a house was also eventually defined separately from mere key possession.

After a few months, when some players and guilds had enough money to buy many houses, there came the problem of using tents and other cheap houses to wall off huge sections of the world as private areas. It was a common solution to the above problems (before they were fixed), if you owned a large house like a tower, to build three smaller houses around the entrance, walling you in, and then using the recall or gate spell to get inside that artificial courtyard. Since some players abused that tactic to create gigantic “courtyards”, the developers eventually opened up all of the major ones by deleting selected houses and by putting the additional restraint on house placement rules requiring that there be empty space around a building before it may be placed.

By the time Trammel was introduced, there was little land for housing. Vast amounts of wilderness were covered, making places intended to be “wild” into cities. When housing was enabled on Trammel, tens of thousands of players simultaneously competed for favored locations for various types of houses, resulting in telestorming, where players were transferred amongst the sub-servers of a given shard, causing random teleportation and lag. For many years, housing space was scarce, due in part to rising numbers of subscribers and only slowly increasing limitations on the number of houses each account could own. Several worlds were created without the ability to have houses built within them to protect their atmosphere from becoming another city. Almost all house transactions during this time were of currently-owned houses being sold, or people waiting outside houses that are about to “decay” (disappear from lack of use). In recent years, additional housing areas have been made available for all players. Many subsequent MMORPGs used instancing for housing or simply did not provide it at all.

El 1974
Posted - 2011.08.28 21:00:00 - [94]
 

People won't feel at home in 0.0, because they will not feel safe. Once they do feel safe in 0.0 that means warfare has stagnated. Empire space is the place for people to build a home. Let people rent spots in empire space (sink) and build and upgrade their own stations (another sink). Don't keep trying to make people lose ships when they rather build their own piece of Eve. Let the players and their corporations shape empire space rather than those stupid NPC corporations.

Korvin
Gallente
Shadow Kingdom
Best Alliance
Posted - 2011.08.29 18:09:00 - [95]
 

Edited by: Korvin on 29/08/2011 18:30:34
Originally by: Cygnet Lythanea
Originally by: Korvin
There are no "Homes" in EVE, there are "Bases" where you can store a set of ships, ammo, loot ets, and move your clone near.

These Bases are formed near places of interests of a particular player or corporation.

The requirements are:
- Ability to store your ships, mods, loot, fit and repair them, have a clone there, and be sure they are relatively safe.
- Ability to get to your places of interest as fast as possible. There are 2 main groups of them - ISK income and PVP targets.
- Easy way to move your assets away or restock your supplies. (Logistics)

It's a noobish mistake to consider only 1 system as your "Home". And I think it's a bad idea to make 1 system self sufficient.
I can call 3-4 regions I feel like home. But not a single system. Even if there is only one system suitable as a base for me.



Yes, and these bases should be as far away from having fun as possible, and involve several spreadsheets. Sorry, Korvin, the newbish mistake is to configure every thing around those things and not around having a good time. If that's how you roll, I bet you burn out corp members on a pretty regular basis.

I set up POS based on if I find the location's aesthetic pleasing or not. I suppose that would qualify as 'of interest' but probably not in the way you think of it. See, I realize that isk can be made pretty much anywhere in eve, and the places that look 'easy' or 'convenient' are actually no such things, as people are usually more then willing to fight for what they think is an easy ride, even if their actual income would be the same there as someplace else.

I can't say that any of them ever fit all three of your requirements and I would suggest that quite a few older players that are still in game would contest your idea that there are no 'homes' in eve. Over the years I've found a few systems I enjoy setting up shop in and operating in for a while before shifting to a new site to keep things fresh.

Never said that. If fun is one of your goals, fun places are places of your interests in the area, and your base should be near them.

p.s.
"fun" is very broad and relative term btw, each can determine the same thing as fun or not.

Erik Finnegan
Gallente
Polytechnique Gallenteenne
Posted - 2011.08.31 20:08:00 - [96]
 

Edited by: Erik Finnegan on 31/08/2011 20:10:06
Home in EVE is not player housing as in other MMOs. I want to disagree with everyone who suggested that home be any sort of structure or system sovereignty or closed off part of (dead)space. That is not home as I can see it being implemented in Eve's terms.

Instead, elaborating on what I wrote in 58, home is an area more than structure. It is infrastructure which resonates in an emotion, a feeling I have of being home, more than a safety belt by game design. It is created by means that the sovereign alliance can opt to use and by me rewarding them by opting to stay there or calling it home.

Home should make me feel safe. But it should not by any means be an absolutely safe place like the instanced home neighbourhoods in other MMOs. Good gracious. I want to come back there because it lends itself to being my hub. A home in EVE, I can see as being transient, too. If it deteriorates, I will move on. Like with my corp in high-sec, where we called home the system we chose because it was favourable to our needs. It worked as home because we chose to call it such. We put the name into e-mail signatures and all.

A home is an area where I can see the evil approach from far. I need to be informed by radio, by bill boards (initiated by the sovereignty holder) what is going on at the borders.

Home must be an instrument that the sovereign power can choose to play so that a feeling of home resonates within me. I think that home might work best if it appeals to the RP-inclined as well as to the min-maxer who needs to have some sort of profit from it. If the home provider plays the instrument well - resulting in a high "population" - he should be rewarded with infrastructure points or whatever will be chosen in the territory control ideas section for the future sovereignty mechanics.

Erik Finnegan
Gallente
Polytechnique Gallenteenne
Posted - 2011.08.31 20:13:00 - [97]
 

May I add that home in EVE seems to be a place where I mine ( "I mine therefor I am" ?! ) as obviously null-sec mining resulted in the most number of feedback posts. That is kind of ironic.

Black Romero
Posted - 2011.09.01 01:58:00 - [98]
 

Originally by: Erik Finnegan
May I add that home in EVE seems to be a place where I mine ( "I mine therefor I am" ?! ) as obviously null-sec mining resulted in the most number of feedback posts. That is kind of ironic.


Just as I was getting to this post (the last so far in the thread) - I thought to myself. I disagree with a lot of these station ideas to an extent. When I think of home I think of my home state. I think how green and fertile it is there. I find that miners in a way as Erik F. pointed out are echoing that.

Which leads me to conclude that "Home" is a place that treated you good. I got really attached to my time spent in an area of 0.0 and a Wormhole I spent a year plus in. I had set down roots. The space treated me good and allowed me to grow. That is what home is to me. Security...yes...to an extent...like Mazlow's hierarchy - but more so I think it is about the land providing.

My .02

Ineka
Gallente
Center for Advanced Studies
Posted - 2011.09.06 14:54:00 - [99]
 

Move to null sec? -maybe some day.

Feel home? -wtf feel home when everything you have can be lost 5min after you log because a large fleet of supers just annihilated everything in the said system/sov?

Feel home when you have to wip your mates ass cause you have to pay billion/s for rent or you're out if you're lucky enough, if not just totally annihilated by the renters that can't keep that space safe for your activities but have enough power to throw you on the other side of the map like it or not?

Until there's some way to work together without having all those drawbacks I'll never go there.
You want to improve null income? -make sort the miners/industrials don't have to pay billions of rent, suddenly null sec will become a very nice place to be and make fortune.



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