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Kijo Rikki
Caldari
Point of No Return
Waterboard
Posted - 2011.08.11 00:59:00 - [1]
 

Edited by: Kijo Rikki on 11/08/2011 01:02:23
Decided to start a new thread from this quote in the London is burning thread.

Originally by: Barakkus
On a side note, I'm reconsidering owning a Blackberry at the moment:
http://www.cnn.com/2011/TECH/web/08/09/london.rioting/index.html?hpt=te_r1

If they're willing to just disclose any and all text messages that "may be related" and I just happen to be somewhere something like this happens, I don't think I'd appreciate police showing up on my doorstep because I text a friend of mine about a video game and say, "zomg i gotz all teh phat lewtz!"


I sincerely hope most of you have read this book. It was required reading when I went to school, dunno about nowadays. Having read it, it should give you at least mild alarm because we seem to have walked right into it without even noticing it, hell, most of us EMBRACED it. Really, its alarming the amount of people who have their lives on broadcast on Facebook or Twitter. Most of us are running around with cell phones and gps devices that can and will keep track of your every move. There are traffic cams over most highways (admittedly, these are low res and insignificant, but are capable of tracking an ID'd vehicle) and red light cams...there are cameras everywhere. We have sophisticated face recognition software that works with remarkable accuracy. We let shoppers bonus cards keep track of our purchasing habits. I could go on, but, tldr derp.

What does it all mean? Nothing, for now. Our government(s) haven't quite turned into the Big Brother state portrayed in the novel, and its possible they never will. Or have they? Are we being watched right now? If not by our governments, then perhaps by the very corporations that control the technology. Does this sensational post worry you, or do you feel comfortable with the technology. Are you happy to trade your privacy for the privilege to stay connected to the world?

If our governments ever did go rogue...do you think we as a people can defeat it with such powerful tools at its disposal, or do you fear the slightest hint of rebellion would result in your sudden and unexplained disappearance?

EDIT! Almost forgot! Also....would you be willing to sever the cord, throw away all cell phones, gps devices, give up the internet, everything...if it became apparent they were tools used by an oppressive government to spy on you and keep you in check.

Ayieka
Caldari
Posted - 2011.08.11 01:15:00 - [2]
 

or just use a brain cell or 2 and understand that anything you do online can be brought back to bite you in the ass. if you're doing/saying **** that could get you in trouble, don't have an e-paper trail.

elementary, watson.

Barakkus
Posted - 2011.08.11 01:20:00 - [3]
 

Originally by: Ayieka
or just use a brain cell or 2 and understand that anything you do online can be brought back to bite you in the ass. if you're doing/saying **** that could get you in trouble, don't have an e-paper trail.

elementary, watson.


That's not really the point, the point is someone could take what you are saying and doing completely out of context and land you in a world of ****. It happens a LOT, just look at all the illegal renditions over the last 10 years perpetrated by my own government. Plenty of muslims have been snatched up, locked away in god knows where, tortured and not seen or heard from for years, then when they are finally satisfied that they are really no-bodies dump them off in the middle of nowhere and go about their business of picking up the next poor *******.

It happens, it's not some fictitious thing, it really does happen, and often.

Kijo Rikki
Caldari
Point of No Return
Waterboard
Posted - 2011.08.11 01:23:00 - [4]
 

Edited by: Kijo Rikki on 11/08/2011 01:24:31
Ayieka, I believe you are missing the point. For one, just being suspected of something, you don't necessarily have to leave an e-paper trail. Any trail that identifies where you are and when you were there is enough to be tracked, regardless of whether you're plotting to rebel or simply posting that little mikey took his first baby steps today. Secondly, the broader implications of my post was directed at a scenario where one might be forced to abandon technology altogether to even afford themselves partial privacy.

Also, Barakkus brings up a point I had not thought of.

Ayieka
Caldari
Posted - 2011.08.11 01:30:00 - [5]
 

looking back, i didnt read the article all the way though.

usually the reason why i sound dumb in every thread.

Kijo Rikki
Caldari
Point of No Return
Waterboard
Posted - 2011.08.11 01:33:00 - [6]
 

It's cool. Give it some thought and come back. I'm hoping this will be a rather engaging topic, I certainly posed enough questions. Though I'm sure its not the first time this subject been brought up.

Barakkus
Posted - 2011.08.11 01:33:00 - [7]
 

Unfortunately it's a trade-off, more technology or more freedom at this point. The more connected we are as a people through technology the less free we become.

I am not particularly pleased with those particular developments because I know RIM will do what suits them, not what is in their customer's best interests. The same goes for Google, Microsoft, Apple, Verizon, etc.

You know what's sad? They try their damnedest to avoid books like 1984 and Animal Farm, etc in the public education system in the US.

The other issue is, what you think is completely harmless, may just get you attention you don't want, and don't deserve. There was a guy that posted some crazy **** while not exactly in control of his faculties on facebook one night, within 5 minutes the police showed up on his doorstep and made his life hell for months, just because he put a quote from Fight Club up on his wall.

Vogue
Short Bus Pole Dancers
Posted - 2011.08.11 01:39:00 - [8]
 

Please visit your user settings to re-enable images.

Rollin' Rollin' Rollin'

Keep movin', movin', movin',
Though they're disapprovin',
Keep them doggies movin' Rawhide!
Don't try to understand 'em,
Just rope and throw and grab 'em,
Soon we'll be living high and wide.
Boy my heart's calculatin'
My true love will be waitin', be waiting at the end of my ride.

Move 'em on, head 'em up,
Head 'em up, move 'em out,
Move 'em on, head 'em out Rawhide!
Set 'em out, ride 'em in
Ride 'em in, let 'em out,
Cut 'em out, ride 'em in Rawhide.

Full Lyrics

Rollin', rollin', rollin'
Rollin', rollin', rollin'
Rollin', rollin', rollin'
Rollin', rollin', rollin'
Rawhide!

Rollin', rollin', rollin'
Though the streams are swollen
Keep them dogies rollin'
Rawhide!
Rain and wind and weather
Hell-bent for leather
Wishin' my gal was by my side.
All the things I'm missin',
Good vittles, love, and kissin',
Are waiting at the end of my ride

CHORUS
Move 'em on, head 'em up
Head 'em up, move 'em on
Move 'em on, head 'em up
Rawhide
Count 'em out, ride 'em in,
Ride 'em in, count 'em out,
Count 'em out, ride 'em in
Rawhide!

Keep movin', movin', movin'
Though they're disapprovin'
Keep them dogies movin'
Rawhide!
Don't try to understand 'em
Just rope, throw, and brand 'em
Soon we'll be living high and wide.
My hearts calculatin'
My true love will be waitin',
Be waitin' at the end of my ride.

Rawhide!
Rawhide!

Pr1ncess Alia
Posted - 2011.08.11 01:42:00 - [9]
 


1984

Intended to be a warning for the populace.


Used as a guidebook by the governments.

Aus Mote
Gallente
Project Sinkhole Command
Posted - 2011.08.11 04:25:00 - [10]
 

Originally by: Barakkus

You know what's sad? They try their damnedest to avoid books like 1984 and Animal Farm, etc in the public education system in the US.



If it's any consolation 1984 is required summer reading at my high school, for seniors. ...granted, I haven't read it yet, but I will in the next week or two.

Selinate
Amarr
Posted - 2011.08.11 04:28:00 - [11]
 

Terrible ****ing book.

Rashmika Sky
Amarr
R. Sky Escorts
Posted - 2011.08.11 04:36:00 - [12]
 

Originally by: Barakkus

You know what's sad? They try their damnedest to avoid books like 1984 and Animal Farm, etc in the public education system in the US.


Odd, 1984 was one of the books read in my English class back in grade school. I enjoyed it then, though it was depressing, but probably should read it again now; likely I would get more out of it today than I did then.

Funny enough (actually, it's sad), the class in general didn't care to read it, or anything else that I could tell. While I think it is good that 1984 was part of the class curriculum, as it's a story people should know, I doubt more than a few people in that class gained from it. In the end, people will learn what they want to learn; schools are irrelevant to that since they focus on the masses that don't care to learn rather than the minority that do.

That being the case, I can't blame schools for not forcing students to read particular books, such as 1984 with its bleak outlook, as I'd consider it a victory just to get most of the students to read anything at all. Even the children's stories I read back in elementary school would probably be an improvement.

I also read Animal Farm in school, though that was a book my father lent me, not part of the school's reading. Another book I should read again, I think.

stoicfaux
Gallente
Posted - 2011.08.11 06:25:00 - [13]
 

Edited by: stoicfaux on 11/08/2011 06:27:14

Yes, but... 1984 assumes that someone has their hand on the rudder and is actively directing the ship to a particular destination.

IMO, all we're seeing (in the US) today is people either trying to accumulate wealth or politicians trying to get re-elected. And since it's a lot easier to solicit a million dollars from one lobbyist with one particular interest than to solicit a 100 dollars from 10,000 people with 10,000 different interests, I think it's just a case of politicians taking special interest money as the easy way of getting re-elected.

OTOH, I did buy the wimpy generic Kroger brand tin foil, so lately I've been thinking that Some Illuminati has a $1 bet that Obama won't be a two term president and is deliberately trying to tank the economy to make the President look bad for the election. You would think that folks would notice that the debt ceiling isn't the problem, the stagnant economy is. Instead of focusing on jump starting the economy, everyone has been instead focused on the artificial debt ceiling limit. It's really odd how easily distracted folks get. And all for a $1 bet.

OTOH, we do have neo-cons trying to kill off the EPA despite things such as Love Canal, the Super Fund cleanup program, smog, acid rain, the hole in the ozone layer, entire towns having to be abandoned due to toxic chemicals in the soil/water, etc.. It's one thing to debate how to balance commercial and environmental issues, it's quite another to simply scream about killing off the EPA and trusting capitalism not to poison the land (again.)

And now corporations have free speech protection and are allowed to contribute unlimited monies to political PACs.

And how science is being portrayed as an evil attack on religion.

And how neo-cons hate unions. It's one thing to point out that any organization (such as unions) with wealth and political power gets corrupted, it's quite another to portray Unions as a Great Blight on society, while ignoring why unions were created in the first place. Or do folks not like having child labor laws, safe working conditions, vacation, a five day work week, etc..

I would beat up on the liberals, but they never really have a coherent plan other than let's help people by giving them someone else's money. Seriously, it's one thing to teach someone to fish, it's quite another to give them a fish, especially when I already had plans for that fish.

Anyway, moral of the story is: don't buy cheap generic tinfoil. As for the future, IMO, it's a tossup as to whether the US collapses under the weight of a under-educated, under-skilled, under-motivated underclass, or we wind up with everyone as a wage slave for a corporate nation-sate living in a city like that in Blade Runner.


AlleyKat
Gallente
The Unwanted.
Posted - 2011.08.11 10:56:00 - [14]
 

Originally by: Kijo Rikki
Almost forgot! Also....would you be willing to sever the cord, throw away all cell phones, gps devices, give up the internet, everything...if it became apparent they were tools used by an oppressive government to spy on you and keep you in check.


Yes. So long as I could still use a computer.


Pr1ncess Alia
Posted - 2011.08.11 10:57:00 - [15]
 

Originally by: Kijo Rikki

EDIT! Almost forgot! Also....would you be willing to sever the cord, throw away all cell phones, gps devices, give up the internet, everything...if it became apparent they were tools used by an oppressive government to spy on you and keep you in check.



Why wouldn't I just sever the cord of the oppressive government instead?

Louis deGuerre
Gallente
Malevolence.
Posted - 2011.08.11 11:19:00 - [16]
 

Originally by: Pr1ncess Alia
1984

Intended to be a warning for the populace.

Used as a guidebook by the governments.


Quoting this.

Now let's all watch Brazil !

Barakkus
Posted - 2011.08.11 11:30:00 - [17]
 

Originally by: Rashmika Sky
Originally by: Barakkus

You know what's sad? They try their damnedest to avoid books like 1984 and Animal Farm, etc in the public education system in the US.


Odd, 1984 was one of the books read in my English class back in grade school. I enjoyed it then, though it was depressing, but probably should read it again now; likely I would get more out of it today than I did then.

Funny enough (actually, it's sad), the class in general didn't care to read it, or anything else that I could tell. While I think it is good that 1984 was part of the class curriculum, as it's a story people should know, I doubt more than a few people in that class gained from it. In the end, people will learn what they want to learn; schools are irrelevant to that since they focus on the masses that don't care to learn rather than the minority that do.

That being the case, I can't blame schools for not forcing students to read particular books, such as 1984 with its bleak outlook, as I'd consider it a victory just to get most of the students to read anything at all. Even the children's stories I read back in elementary school would probably be an improvement.

I also read Animal Farm in school, though that was a book my father lent me, not part of the school's reading. Another book I should read again, I think.


When was this?
I remember quite distinctly all the controversy over trying (and sometimes succeeding) to ban lots of books from public schools like those mentioned and a number of others like Lord of the Flies, Satanic Verses, etc. I don't remember if we actually had Satanic Verses removed from our library, I'm pretty sure it was, but I went to school in a predominately Jewish and Musilim area of Chicago's suburbs.

Kijo Rikki
Caldari
Point of No Return
Waterboard
Posted - 2011.08.11 12:50:00 - [18]
 

IT was still required reading in 1997, the last time I graced a school campus.

Stoicfaux, my brand of tin-foil is slightly superior. With it properly seated on my cranium I can actually buy in to the thought that both parties are like a two-headed demon, secretly working toward a common goal.

The thought would actually make a good book, the story of how a nation was duped by a well orchestrated plan by both parties that caused the people to elect a mutual candidate, and the world goes on thinking we are free people with free elections and we have a choice but really, we're ruled by a single entity.

Cpt Placeholder
Posted - 2011.08.11 13:33:00 - [19]
 

Originally by: Barakkus
Unfortunately it's a trade-off, more technology or more freedom at this point. The more connected we are as a people through technology the less free we become.

It isn't, unless you're broadcasting.
The problem is the public acceptance of surveillance.
The problem is always the public.

Tai Meijer
Caldari
Malkutha
Posted - 2011.08.11 14:01:00 - [20]
 

Originally by: Cpt Placeholder
Originally by: Barakkus
Unfortunately it's a trade-off, more technology or more freedom at this point. The more connected we are as a people through technology the less free we become.

It isn't, unless you're broadcasting.
The problem is the public acceptance of surveillance.
The problem is always the public.


And it's just gotten worse.

"Police have been given the right to unmask thugs bringing choas to Britain's streets and measures could be taken to clamp down on social media, David Cameron announced today.

The Prime Minister, in an emergency statement to the Commons on the violence, suggested sites such as Twitter could be closed down during periods of disorder to avoid co-ordinated unrest.
"

Arrrrgh!

Bane Necran
Minmatar
Posted - 2011.08.11 14:53:00 - [21]
 

Brave New World turned out to be closer to the truth.

Using what we enjoy to control and monitor us, instead of the stark world of 1984. Keeping everyone comfortably drugged and entertained is just as effective as locking them up.

Barakkus
Posted - 2011.08.11 14:59:00 - [22]
 

Originally by: Tai Meijer
Originally by: Cpt Placeholder
Originally by: Barakkus
Unfortunately it's a trade-off, more technology or more freedom at this point. The more connected we are as a people through technology the less free we become.

It isn't, unless you're broadcasting.
The problem is the public acceptance of surveillance.
The problem is always the public.


And it's just gotten worse.

"Police have been given the right to unmask thugs bringing choas to Britain's streets and measures could be taken to clamp down on social media, David Cameron announced today.

The Prime Minister, in an emergency statement to the Commons on the violence, suggested sites such as Twitter could be closed down during periods of disorder to avoid co-ordinated unrest.
"

Arrrrgh!


That's just sad, yet they do everything and anything to keep that stuff up and available when it happens in a country that isn't very friendly with the Western powerblocks...

...the hypocrisy is just unbelievable...

stoicfaux
Gallente
Posted - 2011.08.11 15:20:00 - [23]
 

Some issues with the 1984 comparison:

In 1984, the media was completely controlled by the government. There was one and only one TV station and a TV in every room. I think the internet with its huge random collection of opinions, counter-opinions, pundits, bloggers, activists, rabble rousers, and so on, inhibits a 1984 scenario.

Data mining. Even if the internet could be subverted, monitoring that much communication is difficult even for the Chinese with their Great Firewall. OTOH, IBM's Watson app could make data mining a lot more interesting.

In the US, we (still) have a highly educated volunteer army. I think we would see a coup before a 1984 scenario happen.

1984 had a permanent war going on, and 1984 was written in 1949, fresh after WWII. Today, wars are too expensive and much too destructive to be permanent. A single nuclear ballistic missile submarine can unleash more firepower than was used in all of WWII. As Einstein put it, WWIV would be fought with sticks and stones, a technology/social scenario that doesn't encourage a cabal to implement a 1984 society.

We would have to see some kind of limited war or global event that knocked *everyone* down to 1945-ish technology for a perma-war situation to occur. WWII tech is probably the minimum needed to wage a world war efficiently, and we've all seen what a one-sided tech advantage can mean in Desert Storm. The odds of everyone simultaneously getting knocked back to 1945 era tech is pretty low.


The military has a saying about generals having a tendency to "fight the last war" meaning, they're not preparing for the next war. Ex: Post WWI generals building the Maginot line instead of preparing and training for blitzkrieg. I think 1984 falls in the category of "warning about the last dystopia" instead of warning us about a future dystopia.



Kijo Rikki
Caldari
Point of No Return
Waterboard
Posted - 2011.08.11 15:56:00 - [24]
 

Originally by: stoicfaux
Some issues with the 1984 comparison:

In 1984, the media was completely controlled by the government. There was one and only one TV station and a TV in every room. I think the internet with its huge random collection of opinions, counter-opinions, pundits, bloggers, activists, rabble rousers, and so on, inhibits a 1984 scenario.



True. However I think its still possible with enough anonymous cells to inject false and misleading information which can still achieve the basic objective of a state controlled media - to keep most people in the dark about what is really going on.

Admittedly, in the age where news travels around the world as it happens its hard to obscure the truth but I think everyone here can agree that media outlets can and do make certain stories "disappear" or write misleading articles that obscure the truth about what really happened.

Quote:

Data mining. Even if the internet could be subverted, monitoring that much communication is difficult even for the Chinese with their Great Firewall. OTOH, IBM's Watson app could make data mining a lot more interesting.



Got nothin' but tinfoil conspiracies for this. I've heard rumors we have a telephone monitoring system somewhere in the midwest that monitors every single landline call and listens for keywords. Whether that's true is beyond me.

Personally, I don't think we're far off from the technology to pull it off. Maybe when they get quantum computing down.

Quote:

In the US, we (still) have a highly educated volunteer army. I think we would see a coup before a 1984 scenario happen.



While I'm inclined to agree with you, I have my doubts. Having served in the Army for 3 years, I often ask myself if I was in that position how would I react? It sounds obvious but it depends on several factors, one of which is the information we're given, since the military can lock a place down in a hurry. Knowing what we know, we'll have to make decisions of what we think is right and wrong, and consider our actions and the consequences. Because if any part of the chain of command sides with the government, then our actions can be viewed as treason punishable by death. I think it really depends on each and every military leader and who's side they chose to be on.

Quote:

1984 had a permanent war going on, and 1984 was written in 1949, fresh after WWII. Today, wars are too expensive and much too destructive to be permanent. A single nuclear ballistic missile submarine can unleash more firepower than was used in all of WWII. As Einstein put it, WWIV would be fought with sticks and stones, a technology/social scenario that doesn't encourage a cabal to implement a 1984 society.

We would have to see some kind of limited war or global event that knocked *everyone* down to 1945-ish technology for a perma-war situation to occur. WWII tech is probably the minimum needed to wage a world war efficiently, and we've all seen what a one-sided tech advantage can mean in Desert Storm. The odds of everyone simultaneously getting knocked back to 1945 era tech is pretty low.



Personally I see the ongoing conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan as our permanent war. I don't remember much about the book, but I remember it was a war the people only really heard of, being fought elsewhere with occasional missile strikes launched at our shores to keep the people frightened. Missiles which were launched by the state itself. The context may have changed but it still serves the same purpose. Hell, terrorism actually trumps the intent behind having a permanent war.

Quote:

The military has a saying about generals having a tendency to "fight the last war" meaning, they're not preparing for the next war. Ex: Post WWI generals building the Maginot line instead of preparing and training for blitzkrieg. I think 1984 falls in the category of "warning about the last dystopia" instead of warning us about a future dystopia.



07

Kijo Rikki
Caldari
Point of No Return
Waterboard
Posted - 2011.08.11 16:00:00 - [25]
 

Apparently cannot edit that post, seems to have reached its maximum character capacity.

Just wanted to add about our military:

They are an educated and voluntary force. Speaking specifically about the brass, so to speak, I would not put it past those in power to wish to take the opportunity to aqcuire more.

Jago Kain
Amarr
Ramm's RDI
Tactical Narcotics Team
Posted - 2011.08.11 16:18:00 - [26]
 

Originally by: stoicfaux
Some issues with the 1984 comparison...

...1984 had a permanent war going on, and 1984 was written in 1949, fresh after WWII. Today, wars are too expensive and much too destructive to be permanent...




Erm..... does this mean anything to you?

OK it's a wiki link, but I'm sure that most of the information is verifiable elsewhere, so can we not have the usual tittering from the back 3C.

Upon perusal of this list of not permanent war (focusing on everything after 1945) it does indeed appear that the USA took a break from poking it's nose in around the globe in 1977. Please note that as the article says "...instances where the U.S. gave aid alone, with no military personnel involvement, are excluded, as are CIA-based operations."

However, as this was right in the middle of the "Cold War" and the bogeyman at the time was the USSR which was going to nuke us all in our beds for not being commies and for having decent cars and colour TVs and Wranglers (thanks guys; it made growing up in the 70s and 80s real fun), I don't think we can really say that there has been any time off since WW2. When the spectre of communism and a full blown nuclear war with the reds receded, other conflicts of ideology stepped in to occupy the bogeyman slot.

Winning wars isn't neccessary, all that is neccessary is that there is war to frighten folk with so they will willingly surrender their freedoms... such as they are.

Orwell wasn't a prophet... just a guy who had a good handle on the means that governments (and their owners) use to instill fear into the general populace and use that fear to further their own ends and 1984 is as relevant today as the day it was first published.



Rashmika Sky
Amarr
R. Sky Escorts
Posted - 2011.08.11 20:41:00 - [27]
 

Originally by: Barakkus
Originally by: Rashmika Sky
Originally by: Barakkus

You know what's sad? They try their damnedest to avoid books like 1984 and Animal Farm, etc in the public education system in the US.


Odd, 1984 was one of the books read in my English class back in grade school. I enjoyed it then, though it was depressing, but probably should read it again now; likely I would get more out of it today than I did then.

Funny enough (actually, it's sad), the class in general didn't care to read it, or anything else that I could tell. While I think it is good that 1984 was part of the class curriculum, as it's a story people should know, I doubt more than a few people in that class gained from it. In the end, people will learn what they want to learn; schools are irrelevant to that since they focus on the masses that don't care to learn rather than the minority that do.

That being the case, I can't blame schools for not forcing students to read particular books, such as 1984 with its bleak outlook, as I'd consider it a victory just to get most of the students to read anything at all. Even the children's stories I read back in elementary school would probably be an improvement.

I also read Animal Farm in school, though that was a book my father lent me, not part of the school's reading. Another book I should read again, I think.


When was this?
I remember quite distinctly all the controversy over trying (and sometimes succeeding) to ban lots of books from public schools like those mentioned and a number of others like Lord of the Flies, Satanic Verses, etc. I don't remember if we actually had Satanic Verses removed from our library, I'm pretty sure it was, but I went to school in a predominately Jewish and Musilim area of Chicago's suburbs.

If I recall correctly, it was in 9th or 10th grade, so for me that was late 90s. Maybe that's not recent enough? I suppose I am getting old... Sad
We also read Lord of the Flies, for that matter, since you mentioned it.
It's sad to think that in the so-called Information Age, books would be banned.

Barakkus
Posted - 2011.08.11 20:43:00 - [28]
 

As a side note, did you know Juniper routing equipment uses an IP addressing scheme for it's fabric ware that happens to be the same IP block the US DoD uses? /tinfoil_hat, but that would make it relatively easy to mirror all data going through their routers directly to the US government without anyone noticing unless they started poking around at the configuration for the actual ports on the router, and you have to look pretty damn deep into the router configuration to find that out. :P

Brujo Loco
Amarr
Brujeria Teologica
Posted - 2011.08.11 21:07:00 - [29]
 

So loathing to post here, I hate CCP, but then, I feel the need to post this classic VS strip.

This is NOT 1984 people, you are sorely sidetracked, this is simply a Brave New World ...

and HERE's WHY

Burn CCP, BURN!

Kijo Rikki
Caldari
Point of No Return
Waterboard
Posted - 2011.08.11 21:38:00 - [30]
 

I've never read Brave New World, so thanks for the comic strip, it puts everything nicely together.

There was a poster below that probably described it best. We are experiencing elements of both worlds.


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