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Claire Voyant
Posted - 2011.08.06 13:13:00 - [31]
 

Edited by: Claire Voyant on 06/08/2011 13:23:26
Originally by: Block Ukx
Originally by: INDEEDWATSON Watsonindeed
Well according to that link, you can bid on AUR. Though I don't know how to set up bids or set up orders. Is it possible the owner of the shares buys the AUR?

You need to open an account. Once you login it will be fairly obvious how to place buy/sell orders.

It is fairly obvious that you don't have a clue Block. Trading aurum in your virtual marketplace is not the same as selling the 1000 aurum we all have stuck in our wallets (at least those of us who didn't buy boots or other nonsense.)

Claire Voyant
Posted - 2011.08.06 13:15:00 - [32]
 

Edited by: Claire Voyant on 06/08/2011 13:33:16
Originally by: RAW23
I suggest having a look at this Latin Word Study Tool for all your Latin (and Greek) needs:

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/morph?l=chartis&la=la&prior=e

Type in aura on the right hand side (with Latin selected) and then when it comes up click 'Lewis and Short', which is the standard Latin dictionary. You'll then get the definition of the word with examples, etc.

Guess what. Already done it. When you click on the dictionary link, there is no "aura" and no examples.

Edit: Sorry for being so abrupt Raw, I'm guessing you might actually know something. I had already found that tool and could not find anything on it to contradict me, but latin dictionaries are full of abbreviations that mean nothing to me. There is a search tool but it just returns instances of the word without distinguishing the meaning, so a search for "aura" as air returns the same results as a search for "aura" as gold. You actually have to read the selection in latin to figure out which is which, and that is more than I am willing to do for an internet argument. But no latin dictionary I have found gives an example of "aura" used in classical latin to mean gold.

RAW23
Posted - 2011.08.06 13:31:00 - [33]
 

Edited by: RAW23 on 06/08/2011 13:32:41
Originally by: Claire Voyant
Originally by: RAW23
I suggest having a look at this Latin Word Study Tool for all your Latin (and Greek) needs:

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/morph?l=chartis&la=la&prior=e

Type in aura on the right hand side (with Latin selected) and then when it comes up click 'Lewis and Short', which is the standard Latin dictionary. You'll then get the definition of the word with examples, etc.

Guess what. Already done it. When you click on the dictionary link, there is no "aura" and no examples.


Ok. Now the real pro step is to check the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae/BTL and to go through the 380/498 recorded uses of aura to make sure that none of them are the plural of aurum. Then you will have a pretty definitive position (barring the unearthing of new texts ofc).

RAW23
Posted - 2011.08.06 13:59:00 - [34]
 

Originally by: Claire Voyant

Edit: Sorry for being so abrupt Raw, I'm guessing you might actually know something. I had already found that tool and could not find anything on it to contradict me, but latin dictionaries are full of abbreviations that mean nothing to me. There is a search tool but it just returns instances of the word without distinguishing the meaning, so a search for "aura" as air returns the same results as a search for "aura" as gold. You actually have to read the selection in latin to figure out which is which, and that is more than I am willing to do for an internet argument. But no latin dictionary I have found gives an example of "aura" used in classical latin to mean gold.


No problem. I can't speak to the word under discussion as my Latin is terrible, although I'll ask the wife when she gets home, but I did run up against a similar issue a few years ago when I followed a general consensus that assumed that the word 'nothing' does not appear in the plural in Greek outside of some weird metaphysical fragments of the Stoics (who seem to think that you can have 'not-somethings' or 'nothings' that are not real things but can be thought about). The apparent uniqueness of the Stoic term led to some conclusions about its meaning but I later found out that the plural does also appear, rarely, in a few other places although the meaning seems to be purely adding emphasis to the singular rather than identifying an actual plural. So, I think you're very probably right about aura but on the basis of that experience I would be concerned about an absolute statment.

Elise DarkStar
Posted - 2011.08.06 14:13:00 - [35]
 

You people are nerds.

Lyris Nairn
Caldari
GoonWaffe
Goonswarm Federation
Posted - 2011.08.06 16:56:00 - [36]
 

Originally by: Elise DarkStar
You people are nerds.

Water is wet.

RAW23
Posted - 2011.08.06 17:29:00 - [37]
 

I've just asked my wife (a sometime teacher of Latin at the university level) and, whilst she couldn't give me a precise reference, she seems to be pretty sure that aura is used as the plural of aurum when aurum is understood as meaning 'gold coin' rather than 'gold'.

Lyris Nairn
Caldari
GoonWaffe
Goonswarm Federation
Posted - 2011.08.06 17:41:00 - [38]
 

Originally by: RAW23
I've just asked my wife (a sometime teacher of Latin at the university level) and, whilst she couldn't give me a precise reference, she seems to be pretty sure that aura is used as the plural of aurum when aurum is understood as meaning 'gold coin' rather than 'gold'.


Well obviously it would not make sense to pluralize it in terms of the word "gold" when it is meant to refer to something non-quantitative like, say, the physical element Gold; but, when referring to a quantity, which both AUR and "gold coin" does, it is appropriate to use "aura". That is my understanding, anyway.


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