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blankseplocked caldari motorbikers. i need suggestions.
 
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ATARI BABY
Ministry of War
Posted - 2011.05.19 01:18:00 - [1]
 


hi all.

if im kinda beginner of motorbike stuff, what would you suggest me. (i mean i want to buy a bike, im beginner and im fan of caldari designs.)

so please suggest me a caldari design bike for beginners. (also u can suggest caldarish designs for advanced bikers.)

thanx in advance.



Culmen
Caldari
Culmenation
Posted - 2011.05.19 01:29:00 - [2]
 

As a person who's worked as medic, let me give you one piece of advice.
DON'T RIDE A MOTORCYCLE!

You ever see the gorey result of a car crash?
Now imagine that on body of a human minus the protection of steel frames and airbags.

The crumple zone is your spine.

I've seen motorcyclist die because they got hit by a taxi pulling out onto a road.

If you really must, please where a helmet, it'll turn skull fractures and spinal injuries, into just spinal injuries.




defiler
Mad Hermit
Wayward Alliance
Posted - 2011.05.19 01:51:00 - [3]
 

Originally by: Culmen
If you really must, please where a helmet, it'll turn skull fractures and spinal injuries, into just spinal injuries.
Yep, and also one of those, whatchacallit?, back plates?, under your gear.

My brother was in a pretty nasty crash once when a car made a left turn and failed to spot him on an open road, in good weather and broad daylight. Broke an ankle and both forearms (interesting how much stuff they can bolt to your bones these days), but if it weren't for the veritable suit of armour he was wearing he'd either be dead or a vegetable now.

Momentum and gravity can be a *****.

ATARI BABY
Ministry of War
Posted - 2011.05.19 01:52:00 - [4]
 

Originally by: Culmen
As a person who's worked as medic, let me give you one piece of advice.
DON'T RIDE A MOTORCYCLE!

You ever see the gorey result of a car crash?
Now imagine that on body of a human minus the protection of steel frames and airbags.

The crumple zone is your spine.

I've seen motorcyclist die because they got hit by a taxi pulling out onto a road.

If you really must, please where a helmet, it'll turn skull fractures and spinal injuries, into just spinal injuries.






thank you very much.

actually im really not sure about it and need to hear advice like yours.
but i still need to hear design suggestions even i could not bought one of them.

and be sure if i buy it, ill drive it with full protection coz i aware about the risk. :)



ATARI BABY
Ministry of War
Posted - 2011.05.19 01:55:00 - [5]
 

Edited by: ATARI BABY on 19/05/2011 01:59:43
Originally by: defiler
Originally by: Culmen
If you really must, please where a helmet, it'll turn skull fractures and spinal injuries, into just spinal injuries.
Yep, and also one of those, whatchacallit?, back plates?, under your gear.

My brother was in a pretty nasty crash once when a car made a left turn and failed to spot him on an open road, in good weather and broad daylight. Broke an ankle and both forearms (interesting how much stuff they can bolt to your bones these days), but if it weren't for the veritable suit of armour he was wearing he'd either be dead or a vegetable now.

Momentum and gravity can be a *****.


sorry for your brother.
and those double 'dont buy' replies are means allot.

Alara IonStorm
Caldari
Posted - 2011.05.19 02:03:00 - [6]
 

Edited by: Alara IonStorm on 19/05/2011 02:03:57
What put me off bikes was my dad.

Told me about a friend of his who stoped behind a car, another car pulled up behind him and left a good ammount of space between him and the car.

Some guy goin about 40kph decided he has gonna take the "empty" spot between the 2 cars. Guy went flying and broke his neck, didn't do anything wrong, didn't see it comming. Just died.

Thing about a motorcycle is half the time it is not your mistake that kills you.

Sorry, I could not find an asymmetrical, missile armed, grey motorcycle with antennas comming out in every direction.

defiler
Mad Hermit
Wayward Alliance
Posted - 2011.05.19 02:05:00 - [7]
 

Edited by: defiler on 19/05/2011 02:06:34
Don't mean to discourage you, just to consider the possible consequences and protect yourself accordingly if you really must get a bike.

Allegedly, one of the first things my brother said in the hospital was "I wonder what kind of bike I should buy for the insurance money...", so he wasn't too shaken up by it... Also, apart from a few interesting scars and a slight loss of mobility in his foot he's made a complete recovery. That's one lucky and stir crazy bastard. Cool

Alec Freeman
Minmatar
The Dark Space Initiative
Revival Of The Talocan Empire
Posted - 2011.05.19 04:34:00 - [8]
 

Jeeze. Ok too many doctors play eve. So here is a mechanic's point of view Rolling Eyes. There are many things you must answer about though.

What kind of bike do you want (motocross, street bike, classic, moped etc)
What size of engine you want (I know you said beginer but laws are different in in differenct countries so... 50cc? 125cc? 250cc?)
What do you mean by "Caldari Style"?

As for recomendations for first bikes i would have to say a 125 or 250cc would be best for you when first learning controls (50cc i wouldnt recomend as it is scary when buses try to overtake you Evil or Very Mad )

There are many cheapish motorcycles out there second hand (i recomend 2nd hand for your first unless you have disposable income) for around 1000-3000.

If you would like a nice little rice burner i would have to recomend a Kawaski Ninja 250 or a Honda CBR250, A Yamaha V-star 250 or Suzuki TU250 if you have more classic tastes. I would NOT recomend buying a dirtbike/motocross bike as your first. The large wheels and chunky tires take a bit of getting used to during normal road use though if you do want to go for a dirt bike later on i strongly recomend the Kawaski KLR. They are very good bikes which are easy to maintain, and they will probably drive you to the end of the earth and back :). As for a moped style of bike it really depends what kind of roads you have in your area. If you live in the states in a city where the roads are reletivly well kept and you need something maneuverable to zip around in then a moped is good. If however you live in the countryside with **** roads i strongly recomend you give a moped a pass. They are hell to ride on uneven surfaces due to small wheels.

Jago Kain
Amarr
Ramm's RDI
Tactical Narcotics Team
Posted - 2011.05.19 12:33:00 - [9]
 

Okey doke, as a long term biker who still happens to be breathing and in possession of all my limbs time for me to weigh in.

First off, motorbikes are more dangerous than cars. Sad but true. No crumple zones, two credit card sized patches of rubber keeping you on the road and no matter what you do to stand out (xenon headlight on full beam, dayglo derek jacket, "not-the-police-honest" stripes all over the fairing etc.) some folk still will not see you until you are parked in the side of their Renault Scenic.

If you can live with that (SMIDSY permitting) and you still want to get your motor running and head out on the highway then the first thing to do is look at some proper lessons.

Don't know which country you're from or how old you are, and this may have a bearing on course of action. As I live in the UK I'll state what I think best for here and you can take that into account if the licensing system or other factors are vastly different where you are.

I'd advise having a look on the interwebs for a local bikers' forum (loads of them about; I use several meself) and getting some advice on training from the members on there; they will know what's available in the area and be able to point you in the right direction.

As for bikes, get a bike, not a moped. As a previous poster stated, the small wheels on mopeds are nowhere near as safe as the bigger ones on a proper bike. When you are largely kept stable by the gyroscopic effect of your wheels turning, more is better.

Also, if you get a small bike (say a 125cc) to learn on, it'll have a clutch, proper bike format brakes rather than push-bike type ones, gears and it'll make the transition to a big bike (if you decide to go there) much much easier. It's just more of the same, but bigger, faster, heavier... you can adapt your skills rather than have to learn new ones.

Whatever you buy, get one second hand at first. You can save a lot of money by doing this privately, rather than go through a dealer, but make sure that if you don't know what you're looking for (dealer or private) when inspecting a prospective purchase, you take someone with you who does... potentially lethal faults on a bike can be seemingly unobvious and if you don't know what to look for you could end up buying a death trap. Local bikers' forums are a big help here too; we've all been there at some point and a lot of bikers are only too happy to help out a prospective newbie if you ask nicely.

They will also know which local dealers (should you decide to buy from one of them) are to be avoided; some dealerships are absolute muppets and I've seen guys buy bikes from dealers that wouldn't pass an MOT on the day they picked them up.

If you are not sure, walk away; there's always another one to look at.

You will drop your first bike at some point... everyone does. Better to sc**** something that you can fix cheap than end up with a repair bill in the hundreds (or worse) because you bought a learner bike new. You will also find that if you get the right bike second hand to learn on, you won't lose that much money when you flog it to get something better once you've finished with it. New bikes, particularly small ones in the learner class, bomb in value in the first few years; let someone else take the depreciation hit for you.

There is also the insurance issue. Older bikes, and basic "learner" models (not snot fast Aprillia 125s) cost less to insure and bike insurance is horribly expensive these days for newbs, so minimise your expense until you got a couple of years no claims.

I cannot overstress the importance of proper training. The easiest and safest way to learn is to take instruction from someone who's been doing it for years and knows what they are about. You can just get your CBT and ride a small bike or moped in the UK, but it's a daft idea to do so if you don't know what you're doing.

Most importantly, assume that everyone else on the road is there to kill you and you won't be far wrong.

Jago Kain
Amarr
Ramm's RDI
Tactical Narcotics Team
Posted - 2011.05.19 12:56:00 - [10]
 

(cont from previous post)

As to Caldari style bikes, I'd say the Kawasaki ZR1400 and the Honda Super Blackbird (appropriate) both have a Caldari look to them; brutal looking, available in black and grey (the Honda is available in a really stunning anthracite type colour) but sadly lacking in antennae and missile bays. But not a realistic proposition for a learner... comes under the heading of "one day".

I know that isn't answering your question, but the truth is it doesn't matter what you get to learn on... you're going to bend it and move onto something better soon anyway so it makes little difference.

Make yourself know on your local forums, get something cheap and functional to start, do some training and get to know a bit more about biking and then you'll be in a better position to answer your own questions.

One word of warning about biker forums; just because someone is a biker, it doesn't mean they automatically know what they are talking about. Pretty much like OOPE, it'll be obvious who the pricks are and who's opinion is worth considering after a while.

Also, most forums have a rideout section where local bikers will post up planned trips and meetings. There will always be some guys who won't want a newb with a 125 or whatever slowing them down (some folk have no patience), but you will find ride-outs that are newb friendly and riding out with a pack of like minded individuals on bikes of whatever size is great fun... and usually a lot safer.

I love rideouts myself and find that rolling about with more experienced bikers improves my riding... and I passed my test over 20 years ago. Always something new to learn.

Eek.. nearly forgot. Safety gear. Most important this. Never ever ride without a helmet (full face always - open face won't save you jaw in a sc****) even if the law allows, and a good sturdy pair of gloves and boots. You also need something sturdy in the way of trousers and a jacket. Leathers are optional as a lot of the new fabric stuff is nearly as good in a wipeout and is easier to get waterpoof, but they just don't smell the same. Yes it's a pain when it's really hot, but if you come off and you aren't tanked you'll regret it.

Good luck if you decide to get out there, and remember one more of us is one less of them.



Spookyjay
Caldari
Animosity.
Posted - 2011.05.19 13:02:00 - [11]
 

Edited by: Spookyjay on 19/05/2011 13:12:42
As a biker I have to wade in on this. It is dangerous but so are many things.
All the benefits of a car can be equally as dangerous. We all know people who die in transport accidents it happens. A car can just as easy encase a person in a metal tomb. So don't let any one tell you it is TO dangerous.

Now having said that there are a few points:

All ways go full face helmet.
All ways Wear full gear. If It is hot then buy a bike with panniers so you can take your gear off. Cus at 60 you will not be to hot in gear its only when you stop.
Ride like you Drive a car. Do Not filter traffic doing the speed limit or a fair pace.
If possible only filter stationary traffic.
Wear something high ViS even if its just a wrap and always ride with your lights ON.
"Life Savers" Always always do your "life saver" glance over your shoulder. They are called it for a reason.
"LOUD PIPES SAVE LIVES" Have as little baffle as possible/ get the loudest legal exhausts possible. Not only are they street cred cool but they make people very aware of you.


As for bike choice, Well go look around. find something you like:
here are some tips though that i found helped me:

Do not buy a big custom cruiser/Harley if you aint gonna clean it every week. Or intend to do a lot of wet miles.
If it gets hot where you live. Get a bike with storage for your gear.
Do not buy something from China (Buy jap, Euro or American). China has terrible quality to their welding. Their metal is sub par and the electronics do not like rain.
Sports bikes are like a little devil on your shoulder. You will end up going faster than you should.
Sports tourers are a little less fast but endlessly more comfy.
Wind protection is a must for highways. Naked bikes are fine for around town.

If I was starting out I would take a serious look at the Suzuki Gladius.
Or kawazaki ER6 line. The ER6 line comes fully faired or naked. Both can take luggage options. Both can out pace a boy racer in a hot honda hatch to the speed limit. Both are more comfy than a sports bike. Both will last longer than a sports bike as the engine is far less tuned up. Both hold value very well. The gladius was pre-dated by the Suzuki gs500. the GS500-F that cmae in in the early 000s is considered to have a very bullet proof engine and great value for your buck. What more it has a extensive modification following and can have several upgrades performed by a novice with a manual and web access.



Iasius
Short Bus Pole Dancers
Posted - 2011.05.19 13:03:00 - [12]
 

Edited by: Iasius on 19/05/2011 13:04:58
My dad brought a 600CC Triumph bike yesterday of ebay. It looks so cool with its retro modern looks. A rocket on 2 wheels. But myself i will avoid riding on a fast motorbike as I just don't have the concentration levels or sufficient road craft to ride one without crashing it within a year.

Jno Aubrey
Galactic Patrol
Posted - 2011.05.19 13:12:00 - [13]
 

To get back on topic, finding a Caldari design motorcycle is an interesting idea. You want something that isn't too fast, is either ugly or fairly bland in appearance, and has missile launchers.Razz

OK J/K about the launchers, but you may want to consider the BMW line - something like a F800ST seems to fit the Caldari style sheet for me. And if you live in the USA, be sure to add some ECM in the form of a Radar detector (unless you live in Virginia where they are illegal).

AeroPunk
Minmatar
Posted - 2011.05.19 13:21:00 - [14]
 

Shifting with your foot is weird be ready for that. What really sucks is the rear break is your right foot(what you would use for the gas in a car). I am assuming most bikes all have the same controls of course. I am by no means an expert, but what I do know is leather is a requirement. It's not just so you can pretend to be a bad-ass. If you wear jeans and a tshirt on a bike you need to get you head examined. Of course you will probably end up at the hospital anyway so its not out of your way. Also wear shoes without shoe laces or tuck them in(boots are best). Oh and if you have a belt sander crank that up to full power and put your hand on it(don't use a fine grit, use something that looks like it could do some damage) that might give you an idea of what pavements like. If you fall I am sure the belt sander experience will prevent you from sticking you hand out. Laughing Oh and go for 500cc+. No sense in trying to be safe on a motorcycle anyway right? Just go easy on the throttle and clutch(needs to be smooth or you will pop a wheelie and crash).

Other things.
a 600cc bike usually will get around 50mpg.
fun commute.
quicker commute. Although deadlier(life is to short not to have a little fun though right?)
trying new things is good.
if I see a Drake cruising around my town ill let you know.
buy used.


ATARI BABY
Ministry of War
Posted - 2011.05.19 18:29:00 - [15]
 

Edited by: ATARI BABY on 19/05/2011 21:26:40
Edited by: ATARI BABY on 19/05/2011 19:25:09

thank you all for replies and suggestions. those helped alot.

im 33 years old guy and living in istanbul. (weird trafic and acclivitys here)

i dont like curvy designs. i dont like look of vespa stuff. also harley is not my style. prefere hard edge lines on design. thats what i meant with caldari style. futuristic look ftw. Honda Super Blackbird looks nice but like you said its heavy for beginer.

price range should be arround 5000.

most of people suggesting low cc like 125 or 250 max for beginning. if i dont need too much cc so i can spend my money for good looking maybe? not sure how does performance/price/look things working actually.


Torothin
Phathcom Enterprises
Posted - 2011.05.19 20:19:00 - [16]
 

Please visit your user settings to re-enable images.

Kawasaki Ninja 650r is what I learned on and still own. it's a great starter bike and very forgiving. Plus it looks and sounds great!

ATARI BABY
Ministry of War
Posted - 2011.05.19 21:05:00 - [17]
 

Edited by: ATARI BABY on 19/05/2011 21:10:09


so what do you guys think about panniers on racelike bikes?


Gratuitous
Aura of Darkness
Posted - 2011.05.20 10:06:00 - [18]
 

My 1st bike was a Yamaha R6. The best way to avoid accidents is to ride as fast as the bike will go. That way you will be ahead of the place where you would have crashed. This also allows you to get to know your local officials really well. Also, chicks dig fast bikes.

Gothikia
Regeneration
Posted - 2011.05.20 11:51:00 - [19]
 

Everything that Jaco Kain said +1. My brother and I are both Bikers, he had a horrific crash here in Glasgow in 2007 when someone ran a red light and went into him at 35mph. He ended up with a broken leg in three places and a broken hip - not to mention multiple scars and scuffs even with leathers on.

After that I gave up riding, but still have my bike. To echo what Jaco Kain said, full, proper training is the best thing to do by an experienced rider. Preferably someone with 15+ years experience teaching. And yes, you must always view other vehicles on the road as people who are trying to kill you. Another thing, don't be stupid and ride in the rain, stank covers are stupid amounts of slippery and there is always some patch of oil/diesel on the road somewhere. I slid on diesel once and both me and my bike went into a grassy ditch and that was only me going 20mph. Not fun.

The best thing to do, is to learn as much as you can, go on ride days with folks from forums, and make sure that you have so much hi-vis on that its nigh-on-impossible to miss the sight of you - but most car drivers never look in their mirrors, so always play it safe. Always.

Jago Kain
Amarr
Ramm's RDI
Tactical Narcotics Team
Posted - 2011.05.25 14:02:00 - [20]
 

Edited by: Jago Kain on 25/05/2011 14:31:03
Originally by: ATARI BABY
Edited by: ATARI BABY on 19/05/2011 21:10:09


so what do you guys think about panniers on racelike bikes?




I love 'em. Go for hard luggage if you're bothering though; never yet came across a set of fabric panniers that were actually waterproof and would survive touring.

My bike is more a sports-tourer than an out and out race bike (Suzuki GSX1100F) and I have a Givi rack fitted and it makes touring and small shopping trips a lot easier. With hard luggage the back of your bike also makes a much more stable platorm to bungee all the junk to that you need to take with you touring (tent, sleeping bag, etc.) that won't fit inside the panniers themselves. They're also popular with pillions as they have something a bit more substantial than the normal grab rails to hold on to.

There are a couple of small problem with panniers - they can create a lot of drag at decent speed and can unbalance the bike at low speeds as well... not over much, but enough so's you notice. The solution is simple; I allow for the extra drag/weight/twitchiness when they're on and I take the buggers off if I want to go out for a fast day and throw the waterproofs (I live in the UK remember) in a small bag and strap that to the seat.

Some folk don't like panniers because it makes filtering between traffic more difficult, but I have to say I rarely have a problem with this. You just have to be aware that you're a little wider with them on and make sure you don't go for any stupidly small gaps.

I'm aware that some folk might consider panniers on a superbike uncool, but stuff 'em... it's my bike and I'm long past giving a toss what anyone else thinks. I'm probably going to go for the Super Blackbird for my next bike and the first thing I'll be doing is banging a full rack on.

Decision is yours chap, but they are bloody useful and the brackets can be de-mounted in 10 mins or so if you really don't want them on all the time 'cos the local squids think you're uncool.

With your budget being as high as it is, I'd still get something small and cheap to learn on, invest in some decent safety gear and save the rest for when you've got some experience and a full license and you're looking for something bigger and better. Don't blow it all on something flash that'll lose you lots of isk when you sell.

I've been having a look at Turkish motorcycle sales sites and you should be able to get a decent 125 for less than 1000 that you'll only lose money on slightly when you sell it to fund your next purchase. Remember, depreciation is not your friend and you don't want to spend too much on a flash new learner bike when you'll almost certainly be upgrading in short order.

By the time you've got through your test and decided (as you almost certainly will) that you want something bigger and faster, you'll have had enough time to replace what you've sepnt from your 5000 and this'll get you something really nice in the 600cc class or even a decent 1000cc+ if you look around carefully.

On reflection, I also wouldn't bother with panniers for the small bike... it's not like you'll be touring Europe on a 125 is it?

I got my current bike for 1500 on e-bay with 18k miles on the clock and the insurance is dirt cheap because it's old(ish) and not considered high risk any more... never mind that it does 0-60mph in a smidge over 3 seconds, tops out at over 150mph and makes more power and torque than this year's 1200 Bandit. Supercar performance for less than the cost of a set of alloys for a Porsche. Very Happy

Again, go visit some local biker's forums; you'll get a wealth of more locally relevant advice and some of it may even be useful.



Kara Sharalien
Gallente
Federal Navy Academy
Posted - 2011.05.25 14:16:00 - [21]
 

Edited by: Kara Sharalien on 25/05/2011 14:19:50
Also as someone who went though the new rider experience recently, and who knows about the dangerous side of motorbikes from a medical point of view:

For the love of god don't get either of the two bikes suggested here as your first bike, they will kill your arse dead.

Start on a 250cc bike MAXIMUM. 600cc is far too much power for someone with no riding experience to sit on, and 800cc is a deathtrap for a new rider. If you are still alive and well after 12 months of riding, then move up to a bike that size.

also remember this: motorbike riding is perfectly safe, provided you do two things:

1. Wear all the gear, all the time. Not just a helmet, but a proper jacket, preferably with a spine support, reenforced pants (check out draggin jeans), proper boots and gloves. A crash WILL get you where you are weakest. One of my riding friends plays eve. Someone backed out over him a week or so ago, wouldn't ya know, he wasn't wearing his boots a the time because he was leaving the office. Had all his other safety gear on, but no boots means yep, crushed foot.

2. Don't ride like an arse. Those people that end up quadriplegics after horrific accidents? Lots of them end up that way because they were riding at double the speed limit.

Yes, sometimes you come off your bike at a legal speed, and there happens to be a bus coming the other way. Thats bad luck, and its a risk you take with this form of transport. But your safety gear can and will protect you under many circumstances. But only if you are doing the speeds its designed for. Road safety gear is designed for road speeds, not track speeds.

If you ride at a safe speed, don't do stupid **** like ride down the middle of the lane at traffic lights, and wear your safety gear come rain or shine, you will be as safe as anyone can expect to be on the road.

Also read this, its hilariously informative.

Tagera
Posted - 2011.05.25 15:12:00 - [22]
 

I've been thinking of getting a bike for years. Unfortunately I live in the us and it's hazardous for riders. Even with share the road signs and warnings about being aware for people on motorcycles most drivers are still idiotic and lame brained. Of course thats due to the fact alot of morons don't follow traffic laws. It's illegal in pretty much every state to talk or text on a cellphone unless it's a hands free setup. Yeah....lots of people really follow that one. Most riders are also fairly responsible. You get the occasional nimrod. Had one guy on a crotch rocket come screaming between me and another car on a packed street. Wearing no helmet...he had about 3 inches to spare on a side...almost took off my driver side mirror.

Barakkus
Posted - 2011.05.25 16:19:00 - [23]
 

You could always get one of these Cool

Wu Spacey
Posted - 2011.05.25 18:38:00 - [24]
 

Originally by: Barakkus
You could always get one of these Cool


I like that woman on it.

Opertone
Caldari
Deep Core Mining Inc.
Posted - 2011.05.25 20:30:00 - [25]
 

No matter what others say...

A motorcycle with a side cart is relatively safe.

Sport bikes and Scooters are the most dangerous. Bikes driven in city traffic are dangerous. Over the last 2 years 3 friends of mine had 5 accidents involving 1000 cc Honda Fire, 90 cc Honda Leed, 600 cc HONDA CBR.

Get yourself an ENDURO bike (130 kg) or even a CROSS country bike (70 KG). Lightweight, maneuverable, not supposed to go at very high speed.

I have a DIRT bike myself (45 KG) - easy to handle, hard to hurt yourself. Speed up to 60km/h. DIRT Riding on field/muddy track is more fun than doing 200 km/h on asphalt. Safer too.

To make it look caldari - order a paint job. Or have your helmet painted. With defense plates you will look 'caldarish'.

Kara Sharalien
Gallente
Federal Navy Academy
Posted - 2011.05.26 01:21:00 - [26]
 

Originally by: Opertone
No matter what others say...

A motorcycle with a side cart is relatively safe.

Sport bikes and Scooters are the most dangerous. Bikes driven in city traffic are dangerous. Over the last 2 years 3 friends of mine had 5 accidents involving 1000 cc Honda Fire, 90 cc Honda Leed, 600 cc HONDA CBR.

Get yourself an ENDURO bike (130 kg) or even a CROSS country bike (70 KG). Lightweight, maneuverable, not supposed to go at very high speed.

I have a DIRT bike myself (45 KG) - easy to handle, hard to hurt yourself. Speed up to 60km/h. DIRT Riding on field/muddy track is more fun than doing 200 km/h on asphalt. Safer too.

To make it look caldari - order a paint job. Or have your helmet painted. With defense plates you will look 'caldarish'.


A dirt bike painted dark dark blue with red striped would be obviously caldari to anyone who has flown a caldari t2.

joydivisionn
Posted - 2011.05.31 17:03:00 - [27]
 

There is only 1 answer possible on your question....

Moto Guzzi centauro.

Google and admit im right :-)

(And yes, they realy ride verry fine)





 

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