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Zoggin
Posted - 2011.03.22 20:39:00 - [1]
 

ok here is the thing, I wish to buy a telescope for looking at stars. and the planets within our solar system, however I have no idea where to start, I have no clue as to what the specifications are...

Number of times I have seen stars or perhaps they are planest twinkle in the sky, I have always wanted to take a closer look!

my budget is Ģ200 max, I do live close to a town centre, so light pollution could be a problem, however I can always drive somewhere!!

Main use will be when we do our usual trips to scotland!

Thanks for reading

Zog

ivar R'dhak
Minmatar
Posted - 2011.03.22 21:22:00 - [2]
 

Well for that little money you should start with buying good binoculars first, and a tripod for them.

Binoculars will be much better to start familiarizing yourself with "the heavens" and if "the bug" doesnīt bite you, youīll still have a kickass voyeur equipment. Wink

But all kidding aside, do yourself a favour and research the topic a bit more.
Thereīs lots of standard beginner literature around and then there are the unorthodox types.

I myself find the mainstream supremely boring, they all pretend that everything is already known and amateurs can only do so much.
I believe the opposite to be true, good luck on your search.

Izztyrr Maemtor
Posted - 2011.03.22 22:39:00 - [3]
 

Binoculars are a good start. Borrow a pair and check out the moon as it goes through its phases. I you want to go further. Try building your own telescope. I did years back. Its fun and you'll learn a lot.

Zoggin
Posted - 2011.03.23 00:58:00 - [4]
 

Edited by: Zoggin on 23/03/2011 00:58:23
See thing is, I am fairly familar with the heavens, thanks to the internet, I just want to look at it at more detail, for myself, rather than just some lights in the sky!

Dream case? Find a nice star I can give a name to, I know there are package you can buy where you can name a star after a love one, but I think it would be more fun to find my own!!

What particularly interests me is Nebulas, particularly newer formed ones, those just look amazing, but can you honestly get pictures of those as an amatuer without a loan or a personal observatory?

dream type would be one I could connect to the laptop, and use the lap top to input co-ords or something like that! I know 200 is a low price, but its not a fixed budget!
Edit: however making one is not an option, because I know I would just mess it up!!

Brizae
Amarr
Posted - 2011.03.23 02:23:00 - [5]
 

Edited by: Brizae on 23/03/2011 02:53:14
Discover a star? No, it doesn't quite work like that. Those places that claim to name stars for you are like the companies that rel-estate on the Moon. They both give you a pretty piece of paper that means nothing. You could discover a comet or Earth orbit crossing asteroid. But that takes thousands of dollars in equipment and hundreds and hundreds of hours. Photographing the sky then looking for a small dim smudge that's moving.

Well made computer controlled telescopes cost more the you have to spend and are not for beginners. Meade is a good brand and Celestron is a very good brand. Have a look at their starter scopes. But before you buy anything.

Read this.

Edit: Find an amateur astronomy club near where you live. Look for sites on the web. Read, read, read beginners guides.

Zoggin
Posted - 2011.03.23 02:56:00 - [6]
 

ok perhaps I worded that wrong.

I do not want to discover a NEW star, just find one I like and can be romantic and name it after the girlfriend. and track it etc I couldnt care less if it already has a name really!


Sidus Isaacs
Gallente
Posted - 2011.03.23 08:56:00 - [7]
 

Originally by: Zoggin
ok here is the thing, I wish to buy a telescope for looking at stars. and the planets within our solar system, however I have no idea where to start, I have no clue as to what the specifications are...

Number of times I have seen stars or perhaps they are planest twinkle in the sky, I have always wanted to take a closer look!

my budget is Ģ200 max, I do live close to a town centre, so light pollution could be a problem, however I can always drive somewhere!!

Main use will be when we do our usual trips to scotland!

Thanks for reading

Zog


Check out thunderf00t's guide to new teelscopes on youtube.

Nomen Luni
Posted - 2011.03.23 09:49:00 - [8]
 

I've always wanted a decent telescope , after watching 'wonders of the universe' on tv recently I want one even more now...

Shocked

baltec1
Posted - 2011.03.23 10:54:00 - [9]
 

how to take photos. You should watch all of the stargazing live shows as the are very good for learning the basics from Brian Cox and other exprts. The BBC also has the sky at night, a monthly show that reports on all things space and what to look out. The BEEB also has many tools such as star charts, video and audio guides and forums for getting started

X201207
Caldari
Posted - 2011.03.23 15:01:00 - [10]
 

Edited by: X201207 on 23/03/2011 15:02:06
I'm also buying my first telescope soon with a budget of around 350USD.

Here's the general gist of what I've read about and have decided on thus far --

I'd like either a Orion or Celestron Dobsonian \ Newtonian reflector scope that is capable of making out deep field objects like the Orion nebulae as well as conduct observations of Jupiter and its moons, as well as of course the stock appeal -- the Rings of Saturn. I chiefly blame EVE for this endeavor but a love of space I think preceded even EVE.

I'm looking at a backyard setup and I'd like to get a 2x Barlow Lens so I can observe planets in greater detail. It's either the Orion XT6 or XT4.5 for aperture. I'm trending towards the XT6.
Is this a good choice for a beginner? I don't want one of those go-to automated systems.

Florio
Miniature Giant Space Hamsters
Posted - 2011.03.23 18:36:00 - [11]
 

Originally by: ivar R'dhak
Well for that little money you should start with buying good binoculars first, and a tripod for them.

This I'm afraid. You're just not going to get a good enough telescope for that money. Also, when you're starting off, it's better to start off spending less money (ie. get binoculars) to see whether you have the right stuff/lifestyle to actually get out there frequently enough. I recommend 10*50. Bear in mind that even with a powerful telescope, you won't be able to see all the colours up there anywhere, so be prepared for jupiter to be a tiny colourless monochrome ball. Still amazing once you know your way around the sky and can quickly look at stuff. Andromeda galaxy is ace and easy to find: across the constellation by 3 stars then up 2 then up and a bit to the right ;)

ivar R'dhak
Minmatar
Posted - 2011.03.24 02:39:00 - [12]
 

Edited by: ivar R''dhak on 24/03/2011 02:43:02
Originally by: Florio
Also, when you're starting off, it's better to start off spending less money (ie. get binoculars) to see whether you have the right stuff/lifestyle to actually get out there frequently enough.
To put it bluntly OP, if you canīt get out to the country then forget about it.

Light pollution.

You mentioned vacationing in the Scottish countryside, thatīs a good start. As this hobby is practically impossible to do anywhere near our normal cities.

Take a peek at this light pollution map of Europe. Notice the dark spot in the Balkans? Yeah. Do yourself a favor and book a cheap vacation to the Croat Adriatic ASAP.
Your life will change when you see the true heavens.

http://stellarium.org/

dr cisco
Posted - 2011.03.24 03:10:00 - [13]
 

Originally by: ivar R'dhak
Edited by: ivar R''dhak on 24/03/2011 02:43:02
Originally by: Florio
Also, when you're starting off, it's better to start off spending less money (ie. get binoculars) to see whether you have the right stuff/lifestyle to actually get out there frequently enough.
To put it bluntly OP, if you canīt get out to the country then forget about it.

Light pollution.

You mentioned vacationing in the Scottish countryside, thatīs a good start. As this hobby is practically impossible to do anywhere near our normal cities.

Take a peek at this light pollution map of Europe. Notice the dark spot in the Balkans? Yeah. Do yourself a favor and book a cheap vacation to the Croat Adriatic ASAP.
Your life will change when you see the true heavens.

http://stellarium.org/

what I consider a great accomplishment (our planet artificially lit up like a star) also keeps me from gazing up a the stars which I would love to look at. Houston, Texas, no blue for about 100 miles and no black for about 500 miles (not counting out to sea). just the moon and some planets for me.

Bane Necran
Minmatar
Posted - 2011.03.24 04:31:00 - [14]
 

Just download worldwide telescope.

Ademaro Imre
Caldari
Posted - 2011.03.24 07:19:00 - [15]
 

You do not need an expensive telescope for solar system viewing. What you need is a refractor. Get the most expensive one you can buy that is at least 2.8 inches or so aperature. DO NOT get a newtonian reflector or a schmidt-cassagrain type. Reflectors and SC's are designed to be "light buckets" and the secondary mirror in the middle of the scope will degrade fine viewing when compared to a refractor.

With a refractor, you will have better views of planets, discern better detail and color. With good optics, you will have more fun discovering double stars (star systems that are actually double stars, or two stars lined up to appear to be doubles). You will also have better observations of variable stars (stars whose intensity of light varied over time).

reflectors are used primarily for deep space; galaxies and nebulas and distant star clusters.


X201207
Caldari
Posted - 2011.03.24 18:37:00 - [16]
 

Edited by: X201207 on 24/03/2011 18:37:40
Originally by: Ademaro Imre
You do not need an expensive telescope for solar system viewing. What you need is a refractor. Get the most expensive one you can buy that is at least 2.8 inches or so aperature. DO NOT get a newtonian reflector or a schmidt-cassagrain type. Reflectors and SC's are designed to be "light buckets" and the secondary mirror in the middle of the scope will degrade fine viewing when compared to a refractor.

With a refractor, you will have better views of planets, discern better detail and color. With good optics, you will have more fun discovering double stars (star systems that are actually double stars, or two stars lined up to appear to be doubles). You will also have better observations of variable stars (stars whose intensity of light varied over time).

reflectors are used primarily for deep space; galaxies and nebulas and distant star clusters.




So it is my understanding then that getting a Orion XT4.5 or 6 wouldn't be optimal for viewing the Orion nebulae? Would that type of Dobsonian refractor be nice or do you have an alternative brand and model for my goal -- viewing planets and nebulae with acceptable clarity.

Nex Xen
Gallente
Center for Advanced Studies
Posted - 2011.03.28 05:23:00 - [17]
 

Originally by: Ademaro Imre
You do not need an expensive telescope for solar system viewing. What you need is a refractor. Get the most expensive one you can buy that is at least 2.8 inches or so aperature. DO NOT get a newtonian reflector or a schmidt-cassagrain type. Reflectors and SC's are designed to be "light buckets" and the secondary mirror in the middle of the scope will degrade fine viewing when compared to a refractor.

With a refractor, you will have better views of planets, discern better detail and color. With good optics, you will have more fun discovering double stars (star systems that are actually double stars, or two stars lined up to appear to be doubles). You will also have better observations of variable stars (stars whose intensity of light varied over time).

reflectors are used primarily for deep space; galaxies and nebulas and distant star clusters.





this is all pretty false and a very old way of thinking.

reflectors these days are at least as good as refractors, if collimated properly.

it's all about aperture, and if you think a 3 inch refractor is going to outperform a 12 inch reflector, you're crazy.



To the OP:

the suggestion of a good pair of binoculars is a good one; i would follow that route until you know whether you are hooked on stargazing.

then i'd suggest looking into joining a local astronomy club. they'll get you lined up very quickly.

Baneken
Gallente
The New Knighthood
Apocalypse Now.
Posted - 2011.03.28 07:36:00 - [18]
 

Or better join up to your local observatory's astronomy club at least here in Finland they lease up "telescope time" for you and other general public to pay the rents and stuff plus you get a guide to show you things. Very Happy

also screw the Balkans, Lapland is nice this time of year if you like "skiing down the hill". Razz


 

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