open All Channels
seplocked EVE Information Portal
blankseplocked New Chronicle: Rust Creeps
 
This thread is older than 90 days and has been locked due to inactivity.


 
Pages: 1 [2]

Author Topic

echo4titan
Gallente
Aliastra
Posted - 2010.10.05 10:14:00 - [31]
 

Great story. I like reading these stories, it gives more depth to EVE.

Adumel Wyrd
Gallente
Posted - 2010.10.05 10:30:00 - [32]
 

Originally by: CCP Fallout
Sometimes only a uniquely talented individual can do the needed repairs


Very, very nice!

Thank you

Miss Connolly
Public Relations Corp
Posted - 2010.10.05 11:56:00 - [33]
 

Edited by: Miss Connolly on 05/10/2010 12:14:13
Edited by: Miss Connolly on 05/10/2010 12:12:26
Interesting story. Well written as always.

However, I do find it a little bit to "esoteric" for my liking. In a world dominated by technology I can't imagine any modern person (least of all an engineer who knows how things work on a physical/scientific level) seriously believing that inanimate objects can convey any information that is not physically measurable. Thus I would put down this "skill" to simple mental problems (hearing voices isn't so uncommon for people with mental illnesses).

The human body is equipped with certain sensors - some to process visual stimuli, others for tactile, again others for auditory stimuli and so on and so forth. However, it's still only possible to detect physically existing signals. And it's simply not conceivable that a piece of metal (or other equipment) could somehow "save" information in it that could then be processed by a human sensory system and translated into something such as voices of the previous owners etc. And if it were possible for our (the human bodys) very limited sensors to detect this kind of thing then someone would have invented a tool long ago that would be able to detect this information in a far more efficient way (without all the "hocus pocus" of touching the ships hull etc).

The human body is a simple biological machine and does not possess any characteristics that an equally well-designed technological machine could not also master.

I simply don't believe in magic and other things that don't have a basis in the physical world. They are all just hallucinations, over-active imaginations or simply wishful thinking of people that can not accept that we live in a physical world without magic and "wonder" (though our physical world is full of wonder - just that this wonder has a basis in the physical not not mystical world).

Therefore I interpret this story as the story of a person with a mental illness that causes them to hear voices where there are none (and with much luck or sub-concious processes manages to repair ship parts that others can't repair).

Still found it a fun read even if it did go way to much in the direction of magic/esoterics for my taste. Wink


Edit:
Quote:
People have always said that I was insane for being able to "listen" to a computer and know on an instinctual level what was wrong and how to repair it. Thanks for letting me know that I'm not the only one out there like this.


With all due respect to you and your views, this is exactly what I mean. I'd be the first one to call you crazy - and a quack if you tried to use this magical knowledge to try and fix my computer.

I'd also argument that you would not be able to reliably reproduce this skill in a laboratory setting.

Of course I'd be very interested if you can prove me wrong on that! Very Happy

For me it's quite simple: certain components in a computer can break down and some of these broken components might conceivably produce some sort of signal that you could receive and process (and thus find out what the problem is). An example would be head-crash - you hear that unhealthy sound when you fire up the computer, no argument there. However, for many (or even most) other components this is not the case. If you're standing 1 meter away from my computer then there is simply no physical information available that you can process (without technological or perhaps biogenetic help) that can tell you that some certain component has broken down.

Not unless you can document how this process works (in terms of physics/science).

Gnulpie
Minmatar
Miner Tech
Posted - 2010.10.05 12:21:00 - [34]
 

Phew

What a dark story!


A pretty nice masterpiece, well done.

SteelGunman
Posted - 2010.10.05 15:14:00 - [35]
 

and so as i return to my night shift tonight, i'll be finding myself talking to the very same rusty old machines touched with a thousand used parts by as many different people.

still, it beats listening to the dorks i work with

Femerov
Minmatar
The Black Bha'lir
Saints Amongst Sinners
Posted - 2010.10.05 16:21:00 - [36]
 

a very cool and interesting story :)

GregoriusAtlas
Posted - 2010.10.05 18:18:00 - [37]
 

Originally by: Miss Connolly
Edited by: Miss Connolly on 05/10/2010 12:14:13
Edited by: Miss Connolly on 05/10/2010 12:12:26
Interesting story. Well written as always.

However, I do find it a little bit to "esoteric" for my liking. In a world dominated by technology I can't imagine any modern person (least of all an engineer who knows how things work on a physical/scientific level) seriously believing that inanimate objects can convey any information that is not physically measurable. Thus I would put down this "skill" to simple mental problems (hearing voices isn't so uncommon for people with mental illnesses).

The human body is equipped with certain sensors - some to process visual stimuli, others for tactile, again others for auditory stimuli and so on and so forth. However, it's still only possible to detect physically existing signals. And it's simply not conceivable that a piece of metal (or other equipment) could somehow "save" information in it that could then be processed by a human sensory system and translated into something such as voices of the previous owners etc. And if it were possible for our (the human bodys) very limited sensors to detect this kind of thing then someone would have invented a tool long ago that would be able to detect this information in a far more efficient way (without all the "hocus pocus" of touching the ships hull etc).

The human body is a simple biological machine and does not possess any characteristics that an equally well-designed technological machine could not also master.

I simply don't believe in magic and other things that don't have a basis in the physical world. They are all just hallucinations, over-active imaginations or simply wishful thinking of people that can not accept that we live in a physical world without magic and "wonder" (though our physical world is full of wonder - just that this wonder has a basis in the physical not not mystical world).

Therefore I interpret this story as the story of a person with a mental illness that causes them to hear voices where there are none (and with much luck or sub-concious processes manages to repair ship parts that others can't repair).

Still found it a fun read even if it did go way to much in the direction of magic/esoterics for my taste. Wink
.


Miss Cannolly , don't worry you will have ample proof of the supernatural when you end up in hell . Feel free to consider yourself a biological machine and lie to yourself about the existence of the soul and the world beyond . In the end it will catch up with you .

Andre Coeurl
Gallente
TOHA Heavy Industries
TOHA Conglomerate
Posted - 2010.10.05 19:21:00 - [38]
 

Honestly, a great short story.
This is real literature, and helps me to feel "inside" New Eden as much as an improvement in the graphic engine or a new feature in game would do.
I'm looking forward for more stories like this, and even if some think it was a bit esotheric I think that high technology doesn't imply we know all about the misterious forces of the universe... a travel by airplane, or a cure with laser, would look like magic to a person who lived 200 years ago, yet they're real now.
And the creepy atmosphere further adds to the effect, since thinking about what moves in the bowels of our powerful is something we as capsuleers should do...
Let's just hope no rust will creep inside our pods anyway... Laughing
But, thinking about it, what could float into our amniotic fluid if the pod would malfunction... or if someone managed to sabotage it after all?
Maybe an idea for another cronicle, Abraxas? Wink

Kudos to you in the meanwhile! o7

Lucian Atreides
Caldari
NEXUS.LLC
Posted - 2010.10.05 21:12:00 - [39]
 

One of your Best!

Arnulf Ogunkoya
Minmatar
The Causality
Electus Matari
Posted - 2010.10.06 00:11:00 - [40]
 

Originally by: Jagga Spikes
Originally by: Arnulf Ogunkoya
...

As to psychic skills in game?

Psi isn't an unusual element of science fiction settings so it wouldn't bother me at all.


problem is: all players would get it asap, and then it wouldn't be special at all

nice story tho.


I agree. Which is why any psychics should be NPC baseline humans with no cyber to speak of.

Emperor Cheney
Celebrity Sex Tape
Posted - 2010.10.06 01:27:00 - [41]
 

There's no in-story proof the guy is psychic and it's not just a bunch of sea-tales. Er, space-tales. That's how I read it. This is a textbook unreliable narrator.

Great story as always, I really look forward to the chronicles, and especially the ones that flavor the non-capsuleer society.


Hevia Bane
Gallente
Midgaard's fraender
The Well of Uror
Posted - 2010.10.06 06:55:00 - [42]
 

Razz Very nice story. Hope more will come like this one. Your a good story teller

Ghorrn Kranthil
Posted - 2010.10.06 11:01:00 - [43]
 

Very nice read, both a bit emotionally moving and though... creepy :-D atmospheric, personal. Nice idea to include also the lifespan and decay of people, ships, colonies,... the forthcoming of age and... everything's fate. mysterious, but interesting.
Thanks for this one! *thumbsup*

Paknac Queltel
Baden's Army
Posted - 2010.10.06 12:10:00 - [44]
 

Tall tales for space sailors! This chron is awesome.

Originally by: Miss Connolly
Stuff
You know that sense of unease that you get when you're working on something and it's not quite right, but you can't put your finger on it? Yeah, that's the thing talking to you. Or, more accurately, your subconcious properly interpreting whatever you're missing. It's quite often dead wrong, too, but that's what we have confirmation bias for. The unreliable narrator in this story turned it into magic.

Ifly Uwalk
Caldari
Concentrated Evil
Posted - 2010.10.06 13:32:00 - [45]
 

Quote:
"Instead I signed on to a colony in safe space..."


Safe space is a spoon. Surely even the pedestrians know that.


Nikita Alterana
Kumiho's Smile
Posted - 2010.10.07 13:52:00 - [46]
 

that was just plain awesome
Rust creeps and the ship creaks and we're going into empty space...

Thorian Crystal
Amarr
Posted - 2010.10.07 16:45:00 - [47]
 

I have not much shipped cargo anywhere. Just the usual, fight mobs, find ancient artifacts, eat, ...

CCP Abraxas

Posted - 2010.10.08 11:39:00 - [48]
 

Originally by: Tobin Shalim
Originally by: Esrevid Nekkeg
I knew a man like Eren once. He could feel what was wrong with machines, talked to them, listened to them and repair them too. Always making them work again. A machine wizard he was. Never good around people though.

This story brought back good memories and tears to my eyes. I thank you for that Abraxas.



People have always said that I was insane for being able to "listen" to a computer and know on an instinctual level what was wrong and how to repair it. Thanks for letting me know that I'm not the only one out there like this.

Abraxas, as you can guess, this one hit a little close to home for me. Ty for that.
FWIW, he was based on someone I knew, a person I saw do amazing things with brokedown tech. The same person was the focus, as it were, of the first chapter of The Burning Life.

Gavinton
Posted - 2010.10.14 19:11:00 - [49]
 

Miss Connolly, The human body is much more than a simple biological machine. We know from scientific study that only 10% of our brain is used. (much less for some people i'm afraid...) If you believe in any of the typical religions, then we were created for a purpose and our creator designed us the way we are for a reason, including 90% of unused capacity/capabilities in our little brains.

If you instead believe in pure evolution, our brains evolved the way they did to serve a purpose, the more flexible and efficient designs being selected over the more cumbersome. (at least till we (d)evolved to the point of developing social programs to support those that would be selected for removal from the gene pool.)

In either event, we have a lot of untapped power of some sort sitting in that 90% by design just waiting for the right flip of a switch to enable those subsystems.

If our brains were as simple as you suggest, why is it that true AI has not been developed? (other than the terminator/matrix/hal9000/wargames side effects of the enslavement /annihilation of our technologically inferior species.) Pure logic can be hard coded, simple analysis and learned behaviors can be programmed. But simple emotions and "Human" interaction can't be programmed in because of the soul. They could be simulated, but not created.

Additionally.... This was fiction.. (FIK - Shun)- n. : something invented by the imagination or feigned; specifically : an invented story

Razipo
Posted - 2010.10.14 20:11:00 - [50]
 

Quote:
I couldn't help it. "So Minmatar ships..."

"...can go right to hell," Eren replied with a grin.
\

lololololololol

Shepard Book
Posted - 2010.10.15 21:21:00 - [51]
 

I like. It reminds me of Kaylee.

ViolenTUK
Gallente
Demolition Men
Posted - 2010.10.16 11:08:00 - [52]
 

Rust creeps between CCP Developer Ears.

Shandulf
Posted - 2010.10.16 19:25:00 - [53]
 

Great story, helped pass the time during a long freight run

Arnold Predator
Special Situations
Posted - 2010.10.17 07:32:00 - [54]
 

Very good story. As a mechanic I can tell you that there are people out there like that. There loaners and don't get along with people but when there is a problem with a car that you have spent days trying to find and they come over and with in minutes know what the problem is (with out you telling them), where it is, and how to fix it its kind of scary. The person Im reminded of will put his hand on part of the car and just sit there for a minute then get to work.

Its creepy some times.

Pyroksilin
Posted - 2010.10.17 14:50:00 - [55]
 

Вы временно лишены прав отправки сообщений. Дата и время возобновления ваших прав 24.10.2010, 18:42.


I have a story how one man cruthed allianses.

CHRIBA ? who is dis man ?

Ratatriel
Posted - 2011.01.03 04:12:00 - [56]
 

Edited by: Ratatriel on 03/01/2011 04:12:42
Has no one replied to the ending? It's a stretch, and a risk (as the writer, I mean) to say something like "I hear something beyond.." and end the story that way. However, (and this may be a glass or two of pinot noir talking) I don't think it can work any other way. It's a nice work, and encapsulates the old-tech-making-way-for-new-tech in a very sad way. Great Stuff.


Pages: 1 [2]

This thread is older than 90 days and has been locked due to inactivity.


 


The new forums are live

Please adjust your bookmarks to https://forums.eveonline.com

These forums are archived and read-only