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blankseplocked [Tips] New Players
 
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Hulked
Posted - 2010.05.03 12:11:00 - [1]
 

Edited by: Hulked on 03/05/2010 12:18:25
I need some feedback, let me know what you guys think.
[Tips] New Players
1. Ask Questions!

2. Tutorials, the new players best friend. Go through the starting tutorials, ALL of them!

3. Security Rating, check it or be killed. Keep yourself safe by avoiding low security systems. Empire systems are defined by the security rating 1.0 through 0.5. Low security systems are defined by the security rating 0.4 to 0.1. Lastly, Null Sec is defined by the security rating 0.0, this rating means that anything can happen here, you can get away with killing other players. You will only be the safest in Empire systems.

4. Clones, they can screw you over. Keep your clone up to date! Make sure your clone has more skill points than your character actually has. If you die with an outdated clone, you will lose skill points, and all the time you spent on training those skills.

5. Ships, learn to fly them. You want to fly things efficiently and effectively, keep yourself level headed. Just because you can fly a bigger better ship does NOT mean you can fly it WELL.

6. Insurance, it becomes important. Insurance of a ship will last 12 weeks and there are 6 different types to choose from. It will range from the lowest, Basic, and the highest, Platinum. The best course of action is to buy the Platinum insurance because it will give you the biggest payout if you happen to lose your ship.

7. Local chat, it becomes important. When visiting low security systems you would want to know who all is there, right? Local chat will show everyone in the current system. When new people enter the system, they will join that systems local chat, thus letting you know they are in the system. When people leave, they will leave that local chat, letting you know they are gone.

8. Missioning, try it with friends and corporation members. Missions will go quicker with more people. You will all share profit and standings for completing the missions. So long as the person who turns in the mission chooses the option to share it.

9. The Market, the perfect place to get screwed. Read prices in the market very carefully, it is easy to mistake numbers in this game. You might be paying much more than you bargained for. Even when buying items that seem to be for newer players, ALWAYS CHECK.

10. The Market, it can be a great place to shop, if you know how to use it right. Always click on "View Details" when looking to purchase an item. This will show a more advanced layout of the current item. It will show such details as how many jumps away it is from your current location, the quantity, the price, and the location of the item. Try buying items that are near you, such as ones that are in your current station, system, or only a few jumps away.

11. The Assets Tab, a great way to stay in shape! This tab will show you where all your assets are, and what station they are in. Try keeping your assets close together, only a few jumps apart or even in the same system. Having all your assets in the same area makes it easier for you to access all your ships, items, etc. It will save you jumping from one edge of the universe to the other.

12. Learning Skills, you will want them. Learning skills are very important because they speed up your overall training time for all skills. Say something might take 14 days to complete, well with good learning skills, you could possibly cut that time in half.

13. Focus, a great virtue to have. Try focusing your skills in a few areas, instead of spreading your skill points thin. It would be more beneficial to have more level 4 to 5 skills than a enormous amount of level 1 to 3 skills.

14. Patience, another great virtue to have. This game takes a lot of patience and understanding. The whole benefit of being able to train while offline is sideballed by the fact the training times are longer. So you might not be getting instant gratification, but just think about what your character will be like in a few months down the road.

Malcanis
Caldari
Vanishing Point.
The Initiative.
Posted - 2010.05.03 12:22:00 - [2]
 

My version:

(1) If you played other MMOs a lot before EVE, try and forget everything you learned in them as much as possible, particularly any expectations you have about other players being limited in how they can interact with you, and even more particularly any ideas about character advancement being the aim of the game rather than just another tool to advance your goals like wealth, assets, game knowledge and friends.

(2) If any warnings pop up, read them.

(3) While you will often be told "trust no-one", that's not quite true. What you should do is treat trusting anyone as if it were gambling. What are the odds? What are the stakes? What can I afford to lose? What's in it for him? Scams and ganks are perfectly legal in EVE, even in hi-sec.

(4) When older players give you advice about fitting ships, for the love of god, at least try following their suggestions.

(5) Don't listen to the morons who will advise you to train nothing but Learning skills to start with. Yes, doing that is more "efficient" when it comes to accumulating SP, but you're paying to play the game. A good rule of thumb is to spend no more than 50% of your training time on Learnings until you have basics at 4, advanced at 3. Then just leave them alone for a month or two.

(6) Don't listen to the people who tell you that you shouldn't leave hi-sec "until you're ready" and then tell you you will need x million SP or y ship class or z amount of ISK. You're "ready" to leave hi-sec when you want to leave hi-sec. I know people who left to live in 0.0 on their second day. I went to 0.0 after about 2 months, and I've frequently wished I went earlier. I would however recommend completing all the tutorials before leaving hi-sec.

(7) Don't listen to the idiot moron griefers who spread the pernicious lie that you need 10/20/40M SP and a Battleship/HAC/Dreadnaught "to be competitive" at PvP. Player skill beats character skill in PVP. The best way for a new player to "compete" at PvP is to get out there and do it. Want to learn to PvP? Join Red vs Blue. They will accept anyone no matter what. They aren't a training corp; they exist purely to provide fun PvP on demand in Hi-sec. You can leave or rejoin at any time. If you get a taste for blood, you can get some great training with Agony Unleashed, who will teach you PVP procedures more formally and thoroughly.

(8) You don't have to grind missions to make ISK. Missioning is the EVE equivalent of being on welfare - a boring, low-level income for people who can't find a real job. There's a huge and complex economy out there, with a lot of opportunities for a thoughtful, alert player with a fast, cheap ship.

(9) Do ALL the tutorials.

(10) Everything I've told you is a cheap dirty lie designed to make you lose your ship to me and quit EVE, because I'm a nasty amoral griefer who doesn't want filthy noobs like you cluttering up my nice, l33t game.

Joe Starbreaker
M. Corp
Posted - 2010.05.03 16:36:00 - [3]
 

Commas, don't overuse them.

Ren Nekk
Dead Eye Dogs
Posted - 2010.05.03 16:57:00 - [4]
 

1. If you just started playing 2 days ago and are enjoying EVE because it is "complex," please do not post this on the forums because it forces Ren Nekk to restrain himself from posting things like "WHY ARE YOU STUPID?!?"

2. Don't be like some people I know, constantly wondering things like "Should I train covops, or transport ships?" Who cares - you'll train both eventually!

3. As soon as possible, post on General Discussion about ninja salvaging.

Dian'h Might
Minmatar
Cash and Cargo Liberators Incorporated
Posted - 2010.05.03 17:20:00 - [5]
 

Originally by: Malcanis
stuff


This tbh. Although I'd tack on something to the first one about ships are just tools, not levels or character classes, and you want to use the right tool for the right job etc. etc.

Tallaran Kouros
Cryptonym Sleepers
Posted - 2010.05.03 21:09:00 - [6]
 

Originally by: Hulked
Security Rating, check it or be killed. Keep yourself safe by avoiding low security systems.


Wrong.

There is no safe, just safer and less safe.

You can be killed anywhere, at any time.

You must understand that CONCORD provides consequences, not protection.

sinamrali
Posted - 2010.05.03 22:34:00 - [7]
 

Originally by: Tallaran Kouros
Originally by: Hulked
Security Rating, check it or be killed. Keep yourself safe by avoiding low security systems.


Wrong.

There is no safe, just safer and less safe.

You can be killed anywhere, at any time.

You must understand that CONCORD provides consequences, not protection.


Wrong.

You are 100% safe while docked.

No, wait. You can still be scammed in-station.

100% safety level occurs when you log off and remained logged off as no one can see you. No one can kill/scam you then. Do this if you are afraid.

Ren Nekk
Dead Eye Dogs
Posted - 2010.05.03 23:17:00 - [8]
 

Pity the EVE player who wakes up during the night, terrified in cold sweat, screaming, "Did I log off? Did I forget to log off? ... HAVE THEY KILLED ME?"

Geez Louise.

Xyla Kador
Posted - 2010.05.04 01:13:00 - [9]
 

Originally by: sinamrali
Originally by: Tallaran Kouros
Originally by: Hulked
Security Rating, check it or be killed. Keep yourself safe by avoiding low security systems.


Wrong.

There is no safe, just safer and less safe.

You can be killed anywhere, at any time.

You must understand that CONCORD provides consequences, not protection.


Wrong.

You are 100% safe while docked.

No, wait. You can still be scammed in-station.

100% safety level occurs when you log off and remained logged off as no one can see you. No one can kill/scam you then. Do this if you are afraid.


u get removed as CEO via a vote, get war deced, get all ur orders 1-uped or just bought out of the market altogether, or maybe a POS gets put into reinforced or blown up, corpies spread rumors to get everyone to quit the corp and hate you

all of those can happen while offline.....u can still get hurt financially or politically/socially Rolling Eyes

CrumpleCorn needs to make a sig that says "when u click this:" *create character* "u agree to non-consensual PVP"

mr rastafarian
Posted - 2010.05.04 05:21:00 - [10]
 

Edited by: mr rastafarian on 04/05/2010 05:22:25
i dont consider making 10 - 50 mil an hour on level 4 missions welfare, a maurader pilot can make quite a lot of isk per hour and a decently trained battleship pilot isnt too far behind. yes missioning is not the only reliable form of income in the game, but please try and keep opinionated comparisons out of a new player help thread.
give new palyers the facts and sugestions and make sure to make a clear distinction between the 2, that way they can best make an informed decission

Toshiro GreyHawk
Posted - 2010.05.04 06:38:00 - [11]
 

Ah well, a nice attempt at a basic level advice thread ... that somewhere jumped the tracks.


Just one comment on insurance. You really don't want to insure everything. When I started - I did. I insured my shuttles ... I would have insured my noob ships if they'd have let me. That's just stupid. But, however stupid I can be, I do eventually learn and after realizing that I was paying the full cost of the ship in insurance payments every nine months - and it still hadn't gotten blown up yet I began to realize that for some ships used for some purposes - it made sense to insure them - but for others it didn't.

If you are setting out to PVP - then by all means - insure that ship - as you WILL lose it.

If you a new player and you have no idea what you are doing and you have some ship you just paid most of your ISK to get - then yeah - you might want to insure that one too.

But ... once you've got some idea of what you are doing - most of your ships do not need to be insured.

I've got a fairly large collection of ships now ... and ... I'd go broke insuring all of them.

But remember - don't fly what you can't afford to lose. So if you're flying some ship - think about what will happen if you do lose it. Can you just buy another one? Can you make one? Have a plan for what you'll do.

Missions are fairly simple. You really shouldn't be losing to many ships to missions so - if you know what you are doing you can probably forgo insuring your mission ship.

Haulers ... if you don't carry a lot of stuff ... you probably won't get ganked. If you do ... well then the real loss isn't the ship anyway - it's the cargo and if you got that kind of a cargo ... you should probably be able to just buy another hauler.

Of course for your T2 ships - essentially what happens if you insure them - is you get the pay out for the T1 version of that ship. So ... whether or not it's worth it to you to insure something when you're only going to get a fraction of it's value ... is problematical.

Anyway - it's a risk vs. reward thing. As you play you'll get a better feel for when the risks are worth taking and when they're not.



As to Low Sec ... there is a reason to go down there - and that reason is for the challenge of being there. If you go down there for that reason - then that's fine. If you think you're going to make more money down there than if you stay in high sec ... you're probably wrong. I have mined and run missions in low sec without losing any ships - so it can be done ... but ... it is a royal pain in the ass if all you want to do is make some money. I'm glad I went down there for the experience. Reading the forums on Low Sec survival is educational - and teaches you some things which are, on occasion, valuable in high sec as well. Going down there and putting what you learned to practice is much more valuable than just reading it on the forums. But it takes so much out of your time to do all those things - that ... you would have made a lot more money if you'd just stayed in Hi Sec.

So - it depends on what you want do do.

Adventure - and learning how to survive in a hostile environment - go on down to low sec and be prepared to spend a lot of time running away from people (that or getting blown up).

Making money - stay in high sec.

If you want to learn to PVP ... you want to be with someone who knows what they are doing and will tell you what you are doing wrong. Red vs. Blue is great for just having at it. Agony Unleashed has some great classes that include class roams looking for a fight. EVE University has PVP and other classes as well as the benefits of being in a corporation for a while. You can just go down to Low Sec by yourself and warp around trying not to get blown up - but remember - if YOU shoot first - you are going to take a security hit with Concord. The same rules apply as in Hi Sec - you won't get blown up by Concord for breaking them - but you will take the security hit.







 

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