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Daphne Mezereum
Caldari
Posted - 2010.03.23 23:01:00 - [61]
 

Edited by: Daphne Mezereum on 23/03/2010 23:02:58
Originally by: Odium Devotus

Also, i dont live far fromhumboldt bay. Whats the chances and who would i contact to possibly get an on site tour of the facility?


Well, I don't know if a decomissioned stie has a tour, as that is, essentially, a construction site. Well, a deconstruction one, anways. I would call the NRC, or the local city hall for whatever borough the Humboldt Bay NPP site is located in. If you manage to get a tour, take lots of pictures, and upload them so I can see:)

Also, try to find a working NPP to take a tour in, those can be quite fun. Diablo Canyon, maybe?

Bellum: nah, I don't think that is would be efficient do design a laser-ignition fusion bomb. I'd much rather have some cascading stellarator. To ignite fusion with lasers, you have to focus very, very, very good. Not ideal for something you strap onto the end of a missile.

Originally by: Lance Fighter
Since im interested, what the hell is heavy water?

Ive heard it used, and know the chemical makeup and such, but wtf does it mean? Why is it important?


Hydrogen has two stable and one unstable isotope. The two stable ones are H, your standard hydrogen (one proton), deuterium (one proton, one neutron), while tricitum (one proton, two neutrons) is unstable. Deuterium and tritium are both found in the water, either as HDO, D2O, or HTO (T2O does not exsist as tritium is very scarce).

Now, why do we need water. Well, its our heat conductor, obviously, but also our moderator. After a fission happens, the neutrons emitted in said fission have fat too high energy to be captured by U-235 to induce another fission, so their energy has to be reduced, they have to be slowed down. This is done by making them collide with something their size and mass: protons, aka hydrogen, which is found, not surprisingly, in water. After a couple of collision,s the neutron is slow enough (we call them thermalized neutrons, as their energy is in the thermal movement range), they get captured and induce fission.

Why do we need heavy water, then, if regular hydrogen works well?

Deuterium exists, meaning that the lonely proton in H would sometimes like the company of a neutron, to form D. This, however, will eliminate a neutron that could have been used in fission. So water also absorbs, eliminates part of the neutron flux.

In non-candu, enriched fuel reactors, this is no big deal, as you have got plenty of neutrons. But in CANDU reactors, that use natural uranium, you have a much lower neutron flux, and you need to minimize the amount of neutrons captured in the water. So you use water that has already captured neutrons, aka D2O (heavy water).

What about tritium, then?

Luckily, the likelihood of a D atom capturing another neutron is very small compared to the likelihood of an H atom capturing a neutron, so the amount of neutrons removed by the D+n=T reaction is almost zero.


Semi-joke edit: If anyone wants to donate me isk for my troubles (hell, typing all this takes time:P), feel free to do so:). If this goes against EULA and forum rules, please, ignore this part, and don't lock the thread, dear mod.

Doctor Rothschilde
Posted - 2010.03.24 10:05:00 - [62]
 

First off, nice posting. I work in nuclear decommissioning so it's good to see a constructive, informative thread like this.

Originally by: Daphne Mezereum
It states that a very low level of radiation (5-20 mSv) stimulates the cell repair mechanism, and is thus benefitial to the organism.


I really hope you meant microSv (or even nSv) here though because I can tell you straight out that 5-20 mSv isn't good for you Wink Indeed if you got that much in a year in pretty much any western country the company that you worked for would get absolutely destroyed by the regulators and most companies (at least here in the UK) have a yearly limit of 1 or 2 mSv, depending on the site and it would be a serious incident if you got that much in one go rather than from a lot of smaller doses spread out throughout the year.

Keep up the good work though, I've not read up on Gen IV reactors since I did my Masters back in '04 so it's interesting to see how things are going. I've been too focussed on the decommissioning side of things these last few years, perils of the job I guess!

Skippermonkey
Tactical Knightmare
Posted - 2010.03.24 14:16:00 - [63]
 

Originally by: Doctor Rothschilde
First off, nice posting. I work in nuclear decommissioning so it's good to see a constructive, informative thread like this.

Originally by: Daphne Mezereum
It states that a very low level of radiation (5-20 mSv) stimulates the cell repair mechanism, and is thus benefitial to the organism.


I really hope you meant microSv (or even nSv) here though because I can tell you straight out that 5-20 mSv isn't good for you Wink Indeed if you got that much in a year in pretty much any western country the company that you worked for would get absolutely destroyed by the regulators and most companies (at least here in the UK) have a yearly limit of 1 or 2 mSv, depending on the site and it would be a serious incident if you got that much in one go rather than from a lot of smaller doses spread out throughout the year.

Keep up the good work though, I've not read up on Gen IV reactors since I did my Masters back in '04 so it's interesting to see how things are going. I've been too focussed on the decommissioning side of things these last few years, perils of the job I guess!


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramsar,_Mazandaran#Radioactivity

Daphne Mezereum
Caldari
Posted - 2010.03.24 15:40:00 - [64]
 

Edited by: Daphne Mezereum on 24/03/2010 15:43:02
Edit: Bah, wrong thread

Fenderson
Posted - 2010.03.24 19:39:00 - [65]
 

this thread is win. i have said for a long time that people who care about the environment need to get their head out of their collective ass and realize that nuclear power is an important part of green energy.

how far off do you think we are from achieving the symbiotic fuel cycle that you describe above?

Daphne Mezereum
Caldari
Posted - 2010.04.06 21:31:00 - [66]
 

Edited by: Daphne Mezereum on 06/04/2010 21:39:34
Edited by: Daphne Mezereum on 06/04/2010 21:38:59
Originally by: Fenderson
how far off do you think we are from achieving the symbiotic fuel cycle that you describe above?


From a scientific point of view: zero years. Some of the kinks of having variable-zone molten salt reactors might need to be worked out, but otherwise, there is no scientific barrier stopping us.

From an engineering point of view: well, gen4 reactors aren't going to be mass-operational for the next 15-20 years. Of course, you could always try this symbiotic cycle with G3 reactors and "normal" fast breeders/transmuters.

For a political point of view: well, for this to work, you need at least continent-wide cooperation. Give the IAEA a bit more legislative power, and they might push this through.

So, basically, this depends mainly on two factors: the economics of this thing, and the political will (strongly tied to economics). You see, NPPs cost a hell of a lot more to build than coal plants, so you need a lot of hard cash to finance the high initial costs. After that, they cost next to nothing.

Bottom line: as soon a politicians pull their collective asses and heads apart, this could become viable. After all, with such a system, you do not have to worry about rising energy consumption.

Originally by: Doctor Rothschilde
First off, nice posting. I work in nuclear decommissioning so it's good to see a constructive, informative thread like this.

Originally by: Daphne Mezereum
It states that a very low level of radiation (5-20 mSv) stimulates the cell repair mechanism, and is thus benefitial to the organism.


I really hope you meant microSv (or even nSv) here though because I can tell you straight out that 5-20 mSv isn't good for you Wink Indeed if you got that much in a year in pretty much any western country the company that you worked for would get absolutely destroyed by the regulators and most companies (at least here in the UK) have a yearly limit of 1 or 2 mSv, depending on the site and it would be a serious incident if you got that much in one go rather than from a lot of smaller doses spread out throughout the year.




Erm, correct me if I am wrong, but (at least here in Hungary), the annual dose limit is 1mSv for the public, and 20mSV for workers who work (and are thus paid hefty for) with radioactive material. Its actually 100mSv/5 years, provided no years exceeds 50mSv. And this is in accordance with the ICRP 60 (for all those non-nukers, this is the International Comission on Radiological Protection, and 60 is the currently active, though, under revision, publication detalinig the dose limits of people).

Ahh, found it: Compariosn of ICRP dose limits


All this said, though, I do know that this whole area is a can of worms. I thus strongly advise anyone who is not qualified (if you have to ask yourself if you are, you are not) to deal with radioactive material to stay the **** away from unnecessary excess radiation.

Daphne Mezereum
Caldari
Posted - 2010.04.11 19:07:00 - [67]
 

Shameless self-bump


You may also ask me about nuclear medicine topics, like X-rays, CT,PET scans, and NMRI.


Serafiel
Minmatar
Zaklad Utylizacji Odpadow
Primary.
Posted - 2010.04.11 22:08:00 - [68]
 

As this thread is so nice, here is a nice linky for you all: Nuclear Weapon Archive - very very nice all-around nuclear encyclopedia, from physics to medical effects to nuclear-related politics and treaties.

Also, for anyone interested on what can happen to your health if you get into possesion of a nuclear material while not being nuclear qualified worker... Goania incident

Daphne Mezereum
Caldari
Posted - 2010.04.21 16:50:00 - [69]
 

Originally by: Daphne Mezereum
Shameless self-bump


You may also ask me about nuclear medicine topics, like X-rays, CT,PET scans, and NMRI.




Now taking megapost requests. There are a lot of things people dont know, or know wrongly, about nuclear medicine.

Come on, people, you _must_ have questions about this stuff.

Daphne Mezereum
Caldari
Posted - 2010.05.01 08:02:00 - [70]
 

Bump.

Caldari Citizen20090217
Posted - 2010.05.01 14:33:00 - [71]
 

OK I got one...

Is Polywell a viable option for sustainable fusion and if not what is? And has anyone actually managed to make a fusion generator that continually produces more energy than was put in yet?

Trader20
Posted - 2010.05.01 14:57:00 - [72]
 

Edited by: Trader20 on 01/05/2010 14:58:32

So stars work by nuclear fusion (says wiki), is are modern day technology more efficient then how stars produce energy? Also wats the highest producing way of creating energy?

So Sensational
Ministry of War
Posted - 2010.05.01 19:41:00 - [73]
 

Edited by: So Sensational on 01/05/2010 19:41:07
everytime i used nuclear m on my hurricane i make indanger for nature, how much danger i make per rounds?


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